09-18-2020  7:37 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
Don't Call the Police for domestic disturbances
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Black and Jewish Community Join to Revive Historic Partnership

United in Spirit Oregon brings together members of the NAACP, Jewish Federation of Oregon, others to serve as peacemakers 

Feds Explored Possibly Charging Portland Officials in Unrest

Federal officials were told that Portland police officers were explicitly told not to respond to the federal courthouse

Latest: Report: Downed Power Lines Sparked 13 Oregon Fires

As wildfires continue to burn in Oregon and the west, here are today's updates.

Fires Raise Fight Over Climate Change Before Trump's Visit

The Democratic governors say the fires are a consequence of climate change, while the Trump administration has blamed poor forest management

NEWS BRIEFS

Free Masks and Gloves Now Available for Small Businesses

Businesses with fewer than 50 employees that are headquartered in Oregon with principal operations in Oregon are eligible. ...

Forest Service Explains 'Containment'

US Forest Service, Riverside Fire provides a special update to explain how they achieve wildfire containment. ...

Oregon Receives Approval of Federal Disaster Declaration for Wildfires

Decision will enable federal aid to begin flowing, as unprecedented wildfires ravage state and force evacuation of thousands ...

National Black Farmers' Association President Calls for Boycott of John Deere

Year after year, John Deere has declined NBFA's invitation to display its equipment at the 116,000-member organization's annual...

City of Vancouver Welcomes New Fire Chief

Brennan Blue is replacing Vancouver Fire Chief Joe Molina, who is retiring after 28 years. ...

Man sentenced to repay millions in marijuana lab explosion

MEDFORD, Ore. (AP) — A man has been sentenced to nearly three years in prison and ordered to repay millions of dollars for his role in a marijuana lab explosion that caused a wildfire in which a firefighter got hurt. The Mail Tribune reports 24-year-old Michael Cashmareck was sentenced in...

US judge blocks Postal Service changes that slowed mail

SEATTLE (AP) — A U.S. judge on Thursday blocked controversial Postal Service changes that have slowed mail nationwide, calling them “a politically motivated attack on the efficiency of the Postal Service” before the November election.Judge Stanley Bastian in Yakima, Washington,...

AP Top 25 Reality Check: When streaks end, but not really

For the first time since the end of the 2011 season, Ohio State is not ranked in the AP Top 25.The Buckeyes' streak of 132 straight poll appearances is the second-longest active streak in the country, behind Alabama's 198.Of course, in this strange season of COVID-19, Ohio State's streak was...

Potential impact transfers this season aren't limited to QBs

While most of the offseason chatter surrounding college football transfers inevitably focuses on quarterbacks, plenty of notable players at other positions also switched teams and could make major impacts for their new schools this fall.Miami may offer the clearest example of this.Quarterback...

OPINION

One Huge Lie Crystallized

The Democrats have cast the President as a failed leader, but Trump’s supporters painted him as a success and the last line of defense against radical socialism. ...

“Losers”???!!!

I am hoping that millions of us will teach Trump what it means to be a loser on November 3rd. ...

Letter to the Editor: Regarding 'Initially Supportive Some Community Leaders Criticize Move to Decriminalize Drugs'

I was surprised to see your article with the headline indicating Community Leaders' criticism of Oregon Measure 110. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Drug shows promise in 1st largely minority COVID-19 study

A drug company said Friday that a medicine it sells to tamp down inflammation has helped prevent the need for breathing machines in hospitalized COVID-19 patients in the first large study that primarily enrolled Hispanics and Blacks.Switzerland-based Roche reported the results for tocilizumab, sold...

Biden makes push for voters on National Black Voter Day

DETROIT (AP) — Joe Biden’s campaign unveiled a series of nationwide digital events Friday targeting Black voters in swing states — a strategic move by the Democratic presidential nominee to further energize the key demographic as the race heads into its final weeks.The virtual...

EU unveils plan to combat racism, increase diversity

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Commission presented a series of measures Friday aimed at tackling structural racism and discrimination, acknowledging a blatant lack of diversity among the European Union's institutions.The bloc's executive arm set out its action plan for the next five years,...

ENTERTAINMENT

Keith Urban finds musical connections across genre lines

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — This year was poised to be a busy one for Keith Urban, with a full year of touring as well as a Las Vegas residency. He wasn’t sure when he’d have time to finish his next album “Speed of Now Part 1” when the coronavirus pandemic halted live...

'The Batman' resumes UK production after positive COVID case

The U.K. production of “The Batman” is starting up again after being shut down earlier this month when an individual tested positive for COVID-19. A spokesperson for Warner Bros. said Thursday that filming had resumed after a hiatus for quarantine precautions. The studio has not...

Woody Allen's 'A Rainy Day in New York' to get U.S. release

NEW YORK (AP) — After being shelved for two years, Woody Allen's “A Rainy Day in New York" will finally land in U.S. theaters next month.MPI Media Group and Signature Entertainment announced Thursday that the companies will release “A Rainy Day in New York” in North...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Pope seeks to 'liberate' Virgin Mary from the Mafia

ROME (AP) — Pope Francis is giving his blessing to a new Vatican think tank that is seeking to prevent the...

Van Morrison targets virus restrictions in 3 new songs

LONDON (AP) — Van Morrison has never been one to hold back over the years. Why start now?The 75-year-old...

Firefighter dies battling wildfire sparked by gender reveal

SAN BERNARDINO, Calif. (AP) — A firefighter died battling a wildfire in California that officials said was...

Jewish pilgrims retreat from Ukrainian border

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Thousands of Hasidic Jews, stuck at the Ukrainian border for days due to coronavirus...

Pope seeks to 'liberate' Virgin Mary from the Mafia

ROME (AP) — Pope Francis is giving his blessing to a new Vatican think tank that is seeking to prevent the...

End of the runway? Fashion world mulls post-COVID future

LONDON (AP) — It’s the September fashion week season, and in any other year London would be abuzz...

Don't Call the Police for domestic disturbances
McMenamins
Thomas J. Sheeran the Associated Press

CHARDON, Ohio (AP) -- The deadline to file charges in a fatal high school shooting loomed as students still reeling from the slaying of three teenagers marched by the hundreds to their reopened school Thursday.

The students, many with their parents and wearing the school colors of red and black, started the day gathered around a courthouse square gazebo, quietly singing the alma mater.

Students hugged the parents and one another they left the gazebo, which was decorated with a growing memorial of red roses and carnations, stuffed animals, burned-down candles and handwritten messages of support.

Six hand-drawn angels graced a plastic-covered piece of cardboard with the wish "May God Bless everybody in Chardon." Two bunches of black and white balloons tied to the gazebo railing included red heart-shaped balloons bearing the names of two victims, and a heart cut from red felt read "ONE HEARTBEAT" and urged people to pray for the town.

"I'm just scared for everybody and I don't know how everybody is going to act going back into school," said Theodore Rosch, 16, a freshman, as his father, Will Rosch, wrapped his left arm around his son's shoulders.

A judge said prosecutors had until Thursday to file charges against the shooting suspect, T.J. Lane, a thin, quiet 17-year-old accused of opening fire on a group of students sitting at a cafeteria table at 1,100-student Chardon High School on Monday. Three students died, and two were seriously wounded.

A prosecutor has said Lane, who is in custody, will probably be charged with three counts of aggravated murder and other offenses. Prosecutors are expected to ask that he be tried as an adult.

Lane had been in trouble before, accused of choking and punching his uncle in an assault case from 2009, according to court records released this week by the Geauga County Sheriff's Office and Judge Timothy Grendell.

Lane's uncle had come by the house where Lane was living with his grandparents on Dec. 9, 2009, after Lane said he didn't want to go to a volunteer job required for school, according to the sheriff's office report.

The uncle planned to remove Lane's brother, a drug addict, in hopes of preventing further problems, but the brother didn't want to go and punched the uncle after he tried to grab his coat, the report said.

Lane jumped on his uncle and tried to put him in a "choke hold" while his brother grabbed their uncle's legs, the report said. "TJ stated that he was helping his brother out because he assumed John was hurting Adam," the report said.

Lane entered the juvenile court equivalent of a guilty plea to a reduced misdemeanor charge of disorderly conduct and was given a suspended sentence of up to 30 days in jail.

Grendell wouldn't say if there are other files on Lane that might be covered by a law allowing certain records to be withheld.

Longtime neighbors and friends on Wednesday expressed disbelief at how Lane could be the suspect, describing a boy from a broken family who had struggled in school but appeared to improve once he began staying with his grandparents and attending an alternative school with several dozen students.



"He went from flunking out, from what I understand, to almost a straight-A student with honors, and he was going to graduate a year early," said Russ Miller, who has known Lane for more than a decade and lives near Jack Nolan, Lane's grandfather. Nolan has familial custody of the teenager.

Miller, a Vietnam veteran, said he had talked to Lane about joining the military, but the boy hadn't made plans.

"He was a typical 17-year-old," Miller said. "He didn't really know what he wanted to do in his life." He said Lane didn't smoke, drink or do drugs and is "kind of a health nut."

Another neighbor said Lane played outside often with his sister, building snow hills and skateboarding.

Steve Sawczak, a pastor who has worked with troubled children and lives next to the Nolans, said he never saw hints of trouble from Lane. He said the grandparents gave Lane a healthy place to live and have been left shocked and devastated.

Lane's father, Thomas Lane, had served time in prison on charges of disrupting public service and felonious assault, according to state prison records. Neighbors said he visited his son often, sometimes taking him and his sister camping or to the school to catch the bus.

Prosecutor David Joyce has described the younger Lane as "someone who's not well" and said the teen didn't know the victims but chose them randomly. Killed were Demetrius Hewlin, 16, Russell King Jr., 17, and Daniel Parmertor, 16.

Hewlin's parents told ABC News they have forgiven Lane for shooting their son, noting that Demetrius was often late for school, but not late enough on Monday.

Demetrius' mother Phyllis Ferguson said Wednesday she doesn't know what her son's last moments were like, but she can't worry about that.

"You have to accept things and move on," she said.

When asked what she would say to the suspected shooter, Ferguson said, "I would tell him I forgive him because, a lot of times, they don't know what they're doing. That's all I'd say." Hewlin's parents said they are donating his organs. Their son would have turned 17 next week.

An 18-year-old girl who was hurt in the shootings was released from the hospital Tuesday and was home with relatives, who declined to comment. The second injured teen remained in serious condition Wednesday at a suburban Cleveland hospital.

President Barack Obama on Wednesday offered condolences to Chardon High School principal Andy Fetchik, telling him in a phone call he was heartbroken by the news and asking how the principal and school community were holding up, The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer reported.

A law enforcement official familiar with the investigation said the .22-caliber gun used in the shooting was bought legally in August 2010 from a gun shop in Mentor, Ohio. The official, who spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity because of the ongoing investigation, said Lane told authorities he stole a gun from his uncle.

But a former county sheriff who has long lived near Lane's other grandparents indicated that the shooting appears to have involved a gun that disappeared from a family barn.

A pistol fitting the description of the one used in the shootings was noticed missing after the shooting, said Carl Henderson, 74, a neighbor of grandparents Thomas and Michelle Lane. He said he has spoken to the grandfather and that the man believes the gun is the same.

Both sides in the legal case are under a gag order imposed by the judge at the prosecutor's request. Grendell earlier barred media outlets from taking photos of the suspect's face but reversed the decision Wednesday and said Lane, who appeared at his hearing wearing a bullet proof vest, may be photographed at a pending a hearing next Tuesday. Social media sites have been full of angry and hate-filled remarks directed at Lane.

The AP transmitted photos and video of Lane that were taken before Tuesday's order. The AP and at least one other media outlet, The Plain Dealer of Cleveland, challenged the judge's order Wednesday.

---

Associated Press writer Ann Sanner reported from Willoughby, Ohio; AP video journalist Ted Shaffrey and AP photographer Mark Duncan reported from Chardon; and AP writer Pete Yost in Washington and Andrew Welsh-Huggins in Columbus contributed to this report.

© 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Multnomah County Breastfeeding
Oregon Wildfires hub
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

Kevin Saddler