01-20-2022  7:28 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Blumenauer Boosts Efforts to Put Three Black History Landmarks on National List

Congressman makes case for Mt. Olivet Baptist Church, Dean’s Beauty Salon and Barber Shop, and the Golden West Hotel’s importance to city history and heritage.

PHOTOS: The Skanner Foundation 2022 Scholarship Recipients

Scholarships were awarded to an impressive group of 28 students at The Skanner Foundation 36th Annaul Martin Luther King, Jr. Breakfast

Lawsuit Says New Majority Latino District in WA a 'Facade'

A Latino civil rights organization and others filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday that says new political maps in Washington state approved by a bipartisan redistricting panel intentionally dilute Hispanic voters' influence.

Washington Students' Test Scores Drop Significantly

Reports show that between 2019 and 2021, the overall percentage of students who met state standards on the math portion of the exam fell by 20 percentage points.

NEWS BRIEFS

PassinArt Introduces ‘Play Reading Mondays’

The Spanish Jade and The Learning Curve, both directed by William Earl Ray premiere in February ...

Revamped TriMet Website Makes Planning Trips Easier With Map-Based Tools

Riders can now track real-time locations of buses and trains on their smartphone ...

PHOTOS: Founder of The American History Traveling Museum: The Unspoken Truths Honored

Delbert Richardson's Alpha Phi Alpha, Alpha XI Chapter fraternity brothers presented him a plaque that reads “Your commitment to...

St. Andrew Parish Announces 2022 Martin Luther King, Jr. Awards

Tony Jones was honored with the 2022 Parish Service Award, and the award for Community Service went to Terrance Moses ...

Culture + Trauma: An Artist Comes Home

An installation at the Alberta Arts Salon curated by Bobby Fouther is a visioning of the uncensored Black life. ...

Portland city workers take initial step toward strike

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — More than 1,100 municipal trade workers may strike as Portland leaders and a coalition of public employee unions remain at an impasse on a new contract agreement. Members of the District Council of Trade Unions (DCTU) voted to authorize a strike after...

Oregon residents decry proposed 'permanent' mask mandate

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Hundreds of Oregon residents claimed government overreach on Thursday, as officials at the state’s health authority consider indefinitely extending the current indoor mask requirement due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Oregon Health Authority held a public...

UNLV promotes interim AD Harper to full-time job

LAS VEGAS (AP) — UNLV has promoted interim athletic director Erick Harper to serve in the job full time. Harper's hiring, announced on Monday, was effective Jan. 1. He had served as interim athletic director since Desiree Reed-Francois left UNLV for Missouri in August. ...

Army stuns Missouri in Armed Forces Bowl on last-second FG

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — Cole Talley kicked a 41-yard field goal as time expired and Army rallied to beat Missouri 24-22 in the Armed Forces Bowl on Wednesday night. After the Tigers took a 22-21 lead on a touchdown with 1:11 to play, third-string quarterback Jabari Laws led Army...

OPINION

OP-ED: A House Divided Against Itself Cannot Stand

January 6th, Voting Rights and the Tyranny Threatening America ...

Support Nikole Hannah-Jones and The 1619 Project

This important and ambitious project pulled back the curtain of euphemistic rhetoric composing American historiography that points only to the good in our history and sweeps under the rug the evil deeds perpetrated against people of color ...

In 2021, Organized Labor is Again Flexing its Muscles

We have seen dramatic change in the makeup of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) under President Biden. ...

Study Reveals Racial Pay Gap for Social Media Influencers

The racial pay gap has long presented issues for African Americans in Corporate America and other industries. It’s now filtered to social media. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Jury in federal trial in Floyd killing appears mostly white

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — A jury of 18 people who appeared mostly white was picked Thursday for the federal trial of three Minneapolis police officers charged in George Floyd’s killing, a case that the judge told potential jurors has “absolutely nothing” to do with race. The...

The 18 jurors picked for federal trial over Floyd's killing

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Eighteen people were picked to hear the federal case against three former Minneapolis officers who are charged with violating George Floyd's civil rights during the May 2020 arrest that led to the Black man's death. Twelve jurors will deliberate and six are alternates. Most...

'Sanford and Son' at 50, 'double-edged' Black sitcom pioneer

LOS ANGELES (AP) — When Demond Wilson heard that Redd Foxx was going to star in a TV sitcom, the actor brushed it off as a joke. Foxx was a killer stand-up comic, with a trademark raunchiness that Wilson figured to be a nonstarter for the timid broadcast networks that were...

ENTERTAINMENT

Review: 'Yinka, Where is Your Huzband' funny and big-hearted

NEW YORK (AP) — “Yinka, Where Is Your Huzband” by Lizzie Damilola Blackburn (Pamela Dorman Books) Yinka Oladeji is a 30-year-old, Oxford educated, British Nigerian woman with a good job, living in London who happens to be single. Her accomplishments should carry weight within...

Spears case drives California bid to limit conservatorships

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Disability rights activists and advocates for Britney Spears backed a California proposal Wednesday to provide more protections for those under court-ordered conservatorships, while promoting less-restrictive alternatives. Their move came as the volatile...

Review: ‘Delta Man’ spotlights Allison-Spehar partnership

“Delta Man,” Bobby Allison and Gerry Spehar (Independent) The new album by longtime songwriting collaborators Bobby Allison and Gerry Spehar includes an exuberant self-assessment on “Bubba Billy Boom Boom & Me,” a tune as entertaining as its title. “We was...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Georgia DA asks for special grand jury in election probe

ATLANTA (AP) — The Georgia prosecutor looking into possible attempts to interfere in the 2020 general election...

At 113, NAACP evolves for relevance on racial justice agenda

As the NAACP turns 113, look for its voice to grow louder on issues like climate change, the student debt crisis...

EXPLAINER: Why fear of 5G halting flights has faded

The rollout of new 5G wireless service in the U.S. failed to have the much-dreaded result of crippling air travel,...

EXPLAINER: How sweeping EU rules would curb tech companies

LONDON (AP) — Online companies would have to ramp up efforts to keep harmful content off their platforms and...

Serbia scraps planned Rio Tinto lithium mine after protests

BELGRADE, Serbia (AP) — Trying to defuse large protests by environmentalists, Serbia’s populist government...

Cuban protesters await sentencing, facing long prison terms

HAVANA (AP) — Cuban courts have wrapped up the hearing phase of six mass trials for people accused of...

Thomas J. Sheeran the Associated Press

CHARDON, Ohio (AP) -- The deadline to file charges in a fatal high school shooting loomed as students still reeling from the slaying of three teenagers marched by the hundreds to their reopened school Thursday.

The students, many with their parents and wearing the school colors of red and black, started the day gathered around a courthouse square gazebo, quietly singing the alma mater.

Students hugged the parents and one another they left the gazebo, which was decorated with a growing memorial of red roses and carnations, stuffed animals, burned-down candles and handwritten messages of support.

Six hand-drawn angels graced a plastic-covered piece of cardboard with the wish "May God Bless everybody in Chardon." Two bunches of black and white balloons tied to the gazebo railing included red heart-shaped balloons bearing the names of two victims, and a heart cut from red felt read "ONE HEARTBEAT" and urged people to pray for the town.

"I'm just scared for everybody and I don't know how everybody is going to act going back into school," said Theodore Rosch, 16, a freshman, as his father, Will Rosch, wrapped his left arm around his son's shoulders.

A judge said prosecutors had until Thursday to file charges against the shooting suspect, T.J. Lane, a thin, quiet 17-year-old accused of opening fire on a group of students sitting at a cafeteria table at 1,100-student Chardon High School on Monday. Three students died, and two were seriously wounded.

A prosecutor has said Lane, who is in custody, will probably be charged with three counts of aggravated murder and other offenses. Prosecutors are expected to ask that he be tried as an adult.

Lane had been in trouble before, accused of choking and punching his uncle in an assault case from 2009, according to court records released this week by the Geauga County Sheriff's Office and Judge Timothy Grendell.

Lane's uncle had come by the house where Lane was living with his grandparents on Dec. 9, 2009, after Lane said he didn't want to go to a volunteer job required for school, according to the sheriff's office report.

The uncle planned to remove Lane's brother, a drug addict, in hopes of preventing further problems, but the brother didn't want to go and punched the uncle after he tried to grab his coat, the report said.

Lane jumped on his uncle and tried to put him in a "choke hold" while his brother grabbed their uncle's legs, the report said. "TJ stated that he was helping his brother out because he assumed John was hurting Adam," the report said.

Lane entered the juvenile court equivalent of a guilty plea to a reduced misdemeanor charge of disorderly conduct and was given a suspended sentence of up to 30 days in jail.

Grendell wouldn't say if there are other files on Lane that might be covered by a law allowing certain records to be withheld.

Longtime neighbors and friends on Wednesday expressed disbelief at how Lane could be the suspect, describing a boy from a broken family who had struggled in school but appeared to improve once he began staying with his grandparents and attending an alternative school with several dozen students.



"He went from flunking out, from what I understand, to almost a straight-A student with honors, and he was going to graduate a year early," said Russ Miller, who has known Lane for more than a decade and lives near Jack Nolan, Lane's grandfather. Nolan has familial custody of the teenager.

Miller, a Vietnam veteran, said he had talked to Lane about joining the military, but the boy hadn't made plans.

"He was a typical 17-year-old," Miller said. "He didn't really know what he wanted to do in his life." He said Lane didn't smoke, drink or do drugs and is "kind of a health nut."

Another neighbor said Lane played outside often with his sister, building snow hills and skateboarding.

Steve Sawczak, a pastor who has worked with troubled children and lives next to the Nolans, said he never saw hints of trouble from Lane. He said the grandparents gave Lane a healthy place to live and have been left shocked and devastated.

Lane's father, Thomas Lane, had served time in prison on charges of disrupting public service and felonious assault, according to state prison records. Neighbors said he visited his son often, sometimes taking him and his sister camping or to the school to catch the bus.

Prosecutor David Joyce has described the younger Lane as "someone who's not well" and said the teen didn't know the victims but chose them randomly. Killed were Demetrius Hewlin, 16, Russell King Jr., 17, and Daniel Parmertor, 16.

Hewlin's parents told ABC News they have forgiven Lane for shooting their son, noting that Demetrius was often late for school, but not late enough on Monday.

Demetrius' mother Phyllis Ferguson said Wednesday she doesn't know what her son's last moments were like, but she can't worry about that.

"You have to accept things and move on," she said.

When asked what she would say to the suspected shooter, Ferguson said, "I would tell him I forgive him because, a lot of times, they don't know what they're doing. That's all I'd say." Hewlin's parents said they are donating his organs. Their son would have turned 17 next week.

An 18-year-old girl who was hurt in the shootings was released from the hospital Tuesday and was home with relatives, who declined to comment. The second injured teen remained in serious condition Wednesday at a suburban Cleveland hospital.

President Barack Obama on Wednesday offered condolences to Chardon High School principal Andy Fetchik, telling him in a phone call he was heartbroken by the news and asking how the principal and school community were holding up, The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer reported.

A law enforcement official familiar with the investigation said the .22-caliber gun used in the shooting was bought legally in August 2010 from a gun shop in Mentor, Ohio. The official, who spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity because of the ongoing investigation, said Lane told authorities he stole a gun from his uncle.

But a former county sheriff who has long lived near Lane's other grandparents indicated that the shooting appears to have involved a gun that disappeared from a family barn.

A pistol fitting the description of the one used in the shootings was noticed missing after the shooting, said Carl Henderson, 74, a neighbor of grandparents Thomas and Michelle Lane. He said he has spoken to the grandfather and that the man believes the gun is the same.

Both sides in the legal case are under a gag order imposed by the judge at the prosecutor's request. Grendell earlier barred media outlets from taking photos of the suspect's face but reversed the decision Wednesday and said Lane, who appeared at his hearing wearing a bullet proof vest, may be photographed at a pending a hearing next Tuesday. Social media sites have been full of angry and hate-filled remarks directed at Lane.

The AP transmitted photos and video of Lane that were taken before Tuesday's order. The AP and at least one other media outlet, The Plain Dealer of Cleveland, challenged the judge's order Wednesday.

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Associated Press writer Ann Sanner reported from Willoughby, Ohio; AP video journalist Ted Shaffrey and AP photographer Mark Duncan reported from Chardon; and AP writer Pete Yost in Washington and Andrew Welsh-Huggins in Columbus contributed to this report.

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