07-29-2021  10:32 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Cannabis Chemical Delta-8 Gains Fans, Scrutiny

A chemical cousin of pot’s main intoxicating ingredient has rocketed to popularity over the last year. The cannabis industry and state governments are scrambling to reckon with it amid debate over whether it’s legal.

Report: SPD Stops Black People, Native Americans More

A newly-released report shows Seattle police officers continue to stop and use force against Black people far more often than white people.

As Vaccine Rates in Black Community Stall, County and Faith Leaders Team Up

Fewer than half of the state’s BIPOC adults have been vaccinated, reports show.

One Photographer Is on a Quest to Spotlight the Culture of Black Cowboys

This photographer is on a quest to spotlight the culture of Black cowboys.

NEWS BRIEFS

OSF Presents Free Virtual Reading of Emilia

The event streams live on Wednesday, July 28 at 5:30 p.m. ...

Summer Bike Events to be Held at El Centro Milagro

This summer the streets around Milagro will host a cycle of fun activities. ...

SPLC Urges Department of Education to Prevent Racial Disparities and Discrimination in School Discipline

Research shows that Black students receive more severe disciplinary outcomes for the same behaviors as white students ...

Contractor Selected for Two-Year Morrison Bridge Painting Project

This will be the first time the Morrison Bridge river spans have been painted since the bridge opened 63 years ago in 1958. ...

Carless Zone: Hawthorne Between SE 30th and Cesar Chavez

Celebrate 38 years with neighbors and friends! ...

Judge allows Nevada tribes to join fight over lithium mine

RENO, Nev. (AP) — A judge has cleared the way for two tribes to join an ongoing legal battle over plans to build a Nevada mine at the largest known U.S. deposit of lithium and seek a temporary ban on digging for an archaeological survey they say would desecrate sacred tribal lands near the Oregon...

COVID-19 surge straining Eastern Oregon hospitals

PENDLETON, Ore. (AP) — More than half the patients hospitalized as of Tuesday at CHI St. Anthony Hospital in Pendleton, Oregon, have tested positive for COVID-19, officials said. The hospitalizations come as Umatilla County reports about 8% of the state’s total cases over...

Drinkwitz, Pittman back for Southeastern Conference encores

HOOVER, Ala. (AP) — Missouri and Arkansas both had some encouraging signs, if not great records, in their first seasons under new coaches. Now, the Tigers’ Eliah Drinkwitz and Razorbacks’ Sam Pittman are among four second-year Southeastern Conference coaches trying to...

OPINION

Services Available for Victims and Survivors of Community Violence in Multnomah County

The number of incidents of community violence — domestic violence, sexual violence, trafficking, person-to-person violence and gun violence — is devastating ...

Black America Needs a ‘New Normal’: Equitable Credit Access to Build Wealth

The rippling effects of a massive economic downturn has caused the nation to lose 9.5 million jobs - more losses than even those of the Great Recession ...

The President Needs to Pull Out All Stops

Majority Whip Clyburn, Democratic leader in the U.S. House of Representatives, made the observation that the filibuster currently being used in the U.S. Senate to block the Voting Rights Bill as well as the George Floyd Bill, is a matter of tradition and not...

NAACP Vancouver Letter to the Community: Police Accountability

NAACP Vancouver reacts to the descision in the case of Jonah Donald, a Black man shot and killed by a Clark County deputy ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Ex-police chief who rescued baby pleads guilty to assault

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — A former suburban Kansas City police chief who helped rescue a baby from an icy pond and later assaulted the man accused of trying to kill the infant has pleaded guilty in the case. Greg Hallgrimson, 51, pleaded guilty in federal court Wednesday, the...

Violent arrest in Colorado reignites anger over policing

AURORA, Colo. (AP) — A video showing a police officer pistol-whipping and choking a Black man during an arrest in a Denver suburb has reignited anger over policing in the community, with activists decrying what they say is just the latest example of the mistreatment of people of color. ...

Violent arrest in Colorado reignites anger over policing

AURORA, Colo. (AP) — A video showing a police officer pistol-whipping and choking a Black man during an arrest in a Denver suburb has reignited anger over policing in the community, with activists on Wednesday decrying what they say is just the latest example of the mistreatment of people of...

ENTERTAINMENT

Review: In 'Stillwater,' a red state hero roams chic France

Early on in “Stillwater,” a gruff oil rig worker from Oklahoma is asked what he's doing in the French port city of Marseille. “Visiting my daughter,” he replies. That's only sort of right, it turns out. He left some stuff out. But truth itself gets more than a little...

Review: In 'The Suicide Squad,' an anti-Captain America romp

One little article separates James Gunn’s “The Suicide Squad” from David Ayer’s “Suicide Squad.” But, oh, what a difference a word makes. Just five years after the trainwreck that prompted Warner Bros. to retool its DC Comics universe, James Gunn’s nearly wholesale...

Danticat, Groff among contributors to book 'Small Odysseys'

NEW YORK (AP) — Michael Cunningham, Edwidge Danticat and Carmen Maria Machado are among the prize-winning authors contributing stories to a collection co-sponsored by Manhattan's Symphony Space performing arts center and its nationally aired “Selected Shorts” program. ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Infrastructure deal: Senate suddenly acts to take up bill

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate has voted to begin work on a nearly jumi trillion national infrastructure plan,...

Olympics Latest: US women's volleyball reaches quarterfinals

TOKYO (AP) — The Latest on the Tokyo Olympics, which are taking place under heavy restrictions after a year’s...

Robinhood makes Wall Street debut, stumbles at start

NEW YORK (AP) — Robinhood made its own leap into the stock market Thursday, the one it helped reshape by...

Spanish judge tosses out suit against Polisario Front leader

MADRID (AP) — A Spanish judge on Thursday threw out a lawsuit against the leader of a movement seeking...

Wildfires in southern Turkey leave 3 dead, 58 hospitalized

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkish authorities on Thursday began investigating the cause of a string of forest fires...

AstraZeneca to seek US approval of COVID vaccine in 2nd half

LONDON (AP) — AstraZeneca said Thursday that it intends to seek U.S. approval for its COVID-19 vaccine later...

By The Skanner News

WASHINGTON (AP) -- A government watchdog says U.S. taxpayers are still owed $132.9 billion that companies haven't repaid from the financial bailout, and some of that will never be recovered.

The bailout launched at the height of the financial crisis in September 2008 will continue to exist for years, says a report issued Thursday by Christy Romero, the acting special inspector general for the $700 billion bailout. Some bailout programs, such as the effort to help homeowners avoid foreclosure by reducing mortgage payments, will last as late as 2017, costing the government an additional $51 billion or so.

The gyrating stock market has slowed the Treasury Department's efforts to sell off its stakes in 458 bailed-out companies, the report says. They include insurer American International Group Inc., General Motors Co. and Ally Financial Inc.

If Treasury plans to sell its stock in the three companies at or above the price where taxpayers would break even on their investment - $28.73 a share for AIG, $53.98 for GM - it may take a long time for the market to rebound to that level, the report says. AIG's shares closed Wednesday at $25.31, while GM ended at $24.92. Ally isn't publicly traded.

It will also be challenging for the government to get out of the 458 companies as the market remains volatile and banks struggle keep afloat in the tough economy, it says.

Congress authorized $700 billion for the bailout of financial companies and automakers, and $413.4 billion was paid out. So far the government has recovered about $318 billion. The bailout is called the Troubled Asset Relief Program, or TARP.

"TARP is not over," Romero said in a statement. She said her office will maintain its commitment to protect taxpayers for the duration of the program.

Treasury spokesman Matt Anderson said the department "has made substantial progress winding down TARP and has already recovered more than 77 percent of the funds disbursed for the program, through repayments and other income."

"We'll continue to balance the important goals of exiting our investments as soon as practicable and maximizing value for taxpayers," Anderson said.

The government has unwound its investments in four of the companies that received the most aid: Bank of America Corp., Citigroup Inc., Chrysler Group LLC and Chrysler Financial, the automaker's old lending arm.

On Wednesday, Treasury announced that it had sold the final batch of securities under its $368 million Small Business Administration loan program under TARP.

In Romero's quarterly report to Congress, she said her office has uncovered and prevented fraud related to TARP. Investigations by her office resulted in criminal charges against 10 people and three convictions in the quarter ended Dec. 31, the report notes. Altogether, the investigations have resulted in criminal charges against 61 people, including 45 senior company executives, according to the report. Thirty-one of the 61 individuals have been convicted. Civil charges have been filed against 38 people.

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