05-29-2020  10:21 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Agencies Investigate COVID-19 Outbreaks at Two Townsend Farms Sites

OHA today named the business responsible for COVID-19 outbreaks at multiple locations

Oregon's Top Courts Begin Reversing Nonunanimous Convictions

These are the first of hundreds — and perhaps thousands — of cases that are being scrutinized

Washington Issues New Guidelines for Religious Services

Gov. Inslee announced Wednesday that churches, mosques and synagogues can resume in-person services, with those in counties in the second stage of the reopening plan. King County, which includes Seattle, is among the 15 counties still in Phase 1.

Multnomah County Weighs Impact to Communities of Color in Decision to Re-Open

Multnomah County will submit its application to enter Phase 1 of reopening on June 5, with the goal to reopen June 12.

NEWS BRIEFS

Oregon Health Authority Investigating COVID-19 Increase at Unnamed Business

Oregon reports 71 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases today, no new deaths ...

Some Columbia River Gorge Trails, Parks Reopen Today

Crowded sites including most waterfall viewing areas, campgrounds, and visitor’s centers will stay closed because of the coronavirus...

Over 60 Percent of U.S. Households Have Responded to 2020 Census

Washington is one of the 6 states with the highest self-response rates and both Seattle and Portland are one of the top 8 cities with...

Federal Court Rules Florida Law That Undermined Voting Rights Restoration Is Unconstitutional

The law required people with past convictions to pay all outstanding legal fees, costs, fines, and restitution before regaining their...

WA virus order expiring, counties get more flexibility

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — Washington Gov. Jay Inslee on Friday announced he would not extend the state’s COVID-19 stay-at-home order beyond Sunday and would allow counties more flexibility to apply to advance through the current four-phase reopening plan using updated benchmarks that some...

Sergeant showed ‘pattern of deceit’ in black man's arrest

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — West Linn Police Sgt. Tony Reeves, who was the lead investigator in the wrongful arrest of a black man in Portland, will never again be called to testify in any county criminal court case and should have his police certification revoked, Clackamas County’s...

Kansas, Missouri renew Border War with 4-game football set

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Kansas and Missouri are resuming their bitter Border War in football after the former Big 12 rivals agreed to a four-game series in which each school will play two home games beginning in September 2025.The fourth-longest rivalry in college football dates to 1891, but...

OPINION

A Letter to George Floyd: (Posthumous)

As Black mothers, so often we say, our Black boys across this nation belong to all of us. ...

Ballot Measure 26-210 is Needed Now

Though this measure was referred to the ballot by Metro, it was written by the HereTogether coalition ...

The Skanner News May Primary 2020 Endorsements

Read The Skanner News' midterm election endorsements for Oregon, Multnomah County, Portland, and ballot measures ...

A New Earth Day

Happy Earth Day. If we actually mean it, we will elect representatives who will force the military to clean up their pollution ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Protests, some violent, spread in wake of George Floyd death

ATLANTA (AP) — Demonstrators marched, stopped traffic and in some cases lashed out violently at police as protests erupted Friday in dozens of U.S. cities following the killing of George Floyd after a white officer pressed a knee into his neck while taking him into custody in...

Officer charged with George Floyd's death as protests flare

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The white Minneapolis police officer who pressed his knee into George Floyd’s neck as he begged for air was arrested Friday and charged with murder, as crowds broke overnight curfews imposed to try to stem violent protests over police killings of African Americans...

Biden ally sees Klobuchar as less likely Biden running mate

WASHINGTON (AP) — Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar seems a less likely choice to become Joe Biden's running mate on his presidential ticket following this week's death of a black man in police custody in Minneapolis, a key ally of the former vice president said Friday. Rep. James Clyburn,...

ENTERTAINMENT

Ricky Martin makes 'Pausa' to channel newly found anxiety

NEW YORK (AP) — The world paused and for the first time in his life Ricky Martin felt anxiety. From his home in Los Angeles, where he worked with his foundation to get protective gear and food to hospitals and people in Puerto Rico and beyond, he followed the pandemic news and tried to hide...

Minnesota governor apologizes for arrest of CNN crew

NEW YORK (AP) — Following the arrest of a CNN crew on live television by police on Friday, an apologetic Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz promised that journalists would not be interfered with in reporting on violent protests following the death of George Floyd.CNN correspondent Omar Jimenez and two...

Review: Pop star Gaga is back, but where’s the art or spark?

Lady Gaga, “Chromatica” (Interscope)In the 12 years since Lady Gaga dropped her first album, the singer has exceptionally shown that she knows how to create a killer album.“The Fame” was danceable and clever. “The Fame Monster” was an epic adventure into...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

AP PHOTOS: Street art offers beauty, a laugh, some hope

Scrawled or masterfully crafted on walls and roads are messages of hope and warning. Street art is getting...

Minnesota governor apologizes for arrest of CNN crew

NEW YORK (AP) — Following the arrest of a CNN crew on live television by police on Friday, an apologetic...

Minneapolis protest misinformation stokes racial tensions

CHICAGO (AP) — The false social media posts started just hours after protesters first began chanting and...

AP photo of flag-bearing protester rockets around the world

NEW YORK (AP) — It had been a tense, challenging Thursday evening in the riot-torn Twin Cities for...

Disease that began among rich shifts to Latin America's poor

BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — The passenger from Spain that Sonia Sanchez picked up at the airport in Colombia's...

Travel disruptions challenge global transplant deliveries

PETAH TIKVA, Israel (AP) — Over the past two months, as air travel ground to a halt, Mishel Zrian has...

McMenamins
Kasie Hunt and Philip Elliott the Associated Press

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) -- Throwing elbows to the end, Republican candidates appealed to Iowa residents who were casting the first votes of the 2012 presidential race on Tuesday for a strong send-off into the long campaign season ahead.

Mitt Romney, a confident-but-cautious front-runner for the GOP nomination, looked past his Republican rivals to President Barack Obama in his final pitch to voters.

"This has been a failed presidency," he told voters in a Des Moines ballroom. "I will go to work to get Americans back to work."

With large numbers of likely caucus-goers still undecided or willing to change their minds, the outcome in Iowa was uncertain right up to the finish line in a race that has elevated and then discarded a head-snapping assortment of front-runners.

The two who appeared most likely to challenge Romney for victory in Iowa were former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum and libertarian Rep. Ron Paul of Texas - neither of whom is likely to present as serious a challenge to Romney over the long haul as would former House speaker Newt Gingrich or Texas Gov. Rick Perry.

"It might come down to the speeches at the caucuses," said Phil Ubben, of Sioux City. "I want to support someone who can go all the way and defeat the Democrats in November."

The candidates pinned their final hopes on such voters.

"I think anybody can come in first," Gingrich said on CBS' "The Early Show." That was most likely wishful thinking for the former House speaker, who lost momentum after surging to the front of the GOP pack just weeks ago.

Training their sights on the pack leader, Gingrich, Santorum and other GOP rivals questioned Romney's conservative convictions and predicted Obama would, to use Gingrich's words, "tear him apart."

Santorum, appearing on ABC's "Good Morning America," said Iowans are "looking for the candidate they can trust, and that's why we're moving up in the polls."

On Tuesday night, Republicans will gather in living rooms, high school gymnasiums and local libraries for caucuses that start the process of picking the GOP nominee. In each precinct caucus, voters will urge their friends and neighbors to support a preferred candidate. For all of the attention paid to the caucuses, they are essentially a nonbinding straw poll that awards no delegates. Republicans do that at county and district conventions later in the year.

Twenty-five delegates are at stake in Iowa, out of 1,144 needed to win the Republican nomination - what Romney called "the whole enchilada."

Obama isn't ceding the stage to the Republicans while they sort that out: The president, fresh off a 10-day Hawaiian vacation, made plans to host an evening web chat with supporters in Iowa as the caucuses were under way.

For all the talk of trust and electability, candidates in both parties know the economy is sure to be the central issue this election year: Obama was traveling to Cleveland on Wednesday for an event focused on the economy. Romney, for his part, said he's running to get the country back on track after Obama's mistakes.

Most polls in recent days have put Romney and Paul atop the GOP field in Iowa, with Santorum in third and gaining ground. More than a third of all potential caucus-goers said they could yet change their minds. Perry, Gingrich and Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann all trailed.

Romney faces the same challenge he did in 2008: winning over a conservative base that's uncomfortable with his moderate past. In 2008, socially conservative voters united behind former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, denying Romney a first-place finish and contributing to his eventual defeat.

Romney's 2012 rivals worked to the end in Iowa to exploit questions about his conservative convictions. Perry, speaking to Fox News Channel on Tuesday, dismissed Romney as a "conservative of convenience." Bachmann offered herself as the "one true conservative."

Gingrich said Romney should "level with the American people" about his moderate political views. Asked on CBS if he was calling the former Massachusetts governor a liar, Gingrich said flatly, "Yes." Early on, Gingrich had insisted he'd run a positive campaign, but that strategy shifted after he sank in the polls under the weight of negative ads.

"Iowans have an opportunity to send a message to Washington and to the political system that the age of negative consultants and negative attack ads is over," he told voters in his closing pitch.

Emotions - and rhetoric - were hot in the campaign's final hours.

Santorum, blaming the Paul campaign for recorded phone calls questioning his policies on guns and abortion, told reporters at Fox News that "Ron Paul is disgusting."

Romney said he can handle any criticism his Republican rivals heap on him, calling it only a warm-up to whatever will come from Obama's camp. "My shoulders are wide," he insisted on Fox.

This time, Romney's trying to win Iowa by arguing he's the most electable candidate against Obama - a pitch that's winning over conservatives who desperately want to beat the president.

"I want to make sure I vote for and caucus for someone who is a winner. We cannot have another four years of Obama," said eyeglass salesman Paul Massey, 65.

How many people turn out to vote will help drive the results. In 2008, more than 120,000 Republicans showed up, a record. Weather could be a factor in this year's attendance. Iowa hasn't had much snow this winter, and there were clear but cold forecasts across the state.

After Tuesday's vote, Romney, Gingrich and Santorum planned to depart immediately for New Hampshire. Romney holds a commanding lead in polls there, and will be in a strong position to win even if he doesn't pull out a victory in Iowa. Paul plans to join his rivals in New Hampshire later in the week. The primary is Jan. 10.

Perry and Bachmann, both short-lived front-runners, don't plan to compete in New Hampshire, instead heading straight from Iowa to the first-in-the-South primary, set for Jan. 21 in South Carolina. Bachmann pronounced herself ready to move on: "This election is far from over," she said. "This is the opening chapter. Tonight is the first vote. We've got a long road to go."

Perry tried to buck up disheartened supporters by comparing caucus day to historic military campaigns of yore: "This is Concord," he said. "This is Omaha Beach."

Romney also plans to visit South Carolina this week, with campaign stops Thursday and Friday.

© 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

image of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

Prosper Portland Relief