06-26-2019  1:18 am   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Oregon GOP Senators Extend Walkout to 5th Day

Republicans fled Salem last week over climate vote, and Capitol building closed Saturday after threat

The Latest: Oregon Republicans Missing for Second Day

Republican senators in Oregon engaged in a high-stakes game of brinksmanship Friday with Democratic lawmakers and prepared to remain absent from the Capitol for a second day

Trail Blazers Select Nassir Little With 25th Pick

The Portland Trail Blazers selected North Carolina forward Nassir Little with the 25th pick in the NBA draft on Thursday night.

High Court Avoids New Case Over Same-sex Wedding Cake

The Supreme Court decided Monday against a high-stakes, election-year case about the competing rights of gay and lesbian couples and merchants who refuse to provide services for same-sex weddings.

NEWS BRIEFS

Black Excellence on the World Stage: W.E.B. Du Bois Exhibit at Portland Art Museum

In an exhibit at the 1900 Paris Exposition, W.E.B. Du Bois presented a remarkable portrait of African American life. A selection of...

Education as a Path to Leadership Organization Awards Scholarships to Washington Women

Woman of Wonder chose three Washington women for its first scholarships. ...

Oregon May Allow Bicyclist to Yield, Not Stop, at Stop Signs

A study found this practice to be safer. ...

Kaiser Permanente, Seattle Colleges Offer Scholarships for Medical Assistant Students

Scholarships aim to build workforce for better care, better jobs ...

Chief Outlaw Relaxes Police Officer Hiring Standards

The Portland Police Bureau is experiencing a staffing shortage, as it currently has 128 officer vacancies, with a large number of...

In Oregon, stark rural-urban divide fuels climate dispute

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The divide in Oregon between the state's liberal, urban population centers and its conservative and economically depressed rural areas has made it fertile ground for the political crisis unfolding over a push by Democrats to enact sweeping climate legislation.Eleven...

Oregon city council clarifies rule to stop curbside camping

EUGENE, Ore. (AP) — An Oregon city council has passed a legal clarification that it hopes will end curbside camping.The Register-Guard reported Monday that city councilors in Eugene voted 6-0 Monday to allow trespass complaints against people who set up tents on strips of land between...

Former Missouri football coach Pinkel says cancer returned

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Former Missouri football coach Gary Pinkel says he is being treated for cancer again.Pinkel told ABC17 TV in Columbia Saturday that he had treatment last month after his cancer came out of remission for the first time in four years.Pinkel retired after the 2015 season...

OPINION

US Poverty Statistics Ignore Millions of Struggling Americans

Researchers say: Families with two out of five different types of deprivation qualify as poor: low income; poor health; no High School diploma; unemployed; no health insurance ...

Creative + Strategic = Effective Movements for Change

Author and Editor Rivera Sun says if you want to make change, think outside the protest box. ...

Mayor Dyer and Chief Mina Accused of Excessive Force in Lawsuit: What Has Changed?

During an arrest in 2015 of bank department executive, Noel Carter, who happens to be a Black man was viciously and brutally beaten along Orange Avenue early in the morning. ...

U.S. Attempt to Erase Harriet Tubman

Traitors like Jefferson Davis and other Confederates are memorialized while a woman who risked her life time and again to free enslaved people is simply dismissed. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Can 2020 Dems do more than just decry Trump on immigration?

Democratic presidential hopefuls face a challenge as they gather in Miami for the opening round of primary debates: presenting immigration ideas that go beyond simply bashing the Trump administration.Most of the proposals that the contenders have advanced combine long-held Democratic priorities...

Federal judges send 2020 census lawsuit back to lower court

BALTIMORE (AP) — A lawsuit that alleges a 2020 census question pushed by the Trump administration violates minorities' rights will be sent back to a federal court in Maryland so new evidence can be considered, U.S. appeals judges ruled Tuesday.The 4th Circuit Court of Appeals' decision comes...

Illinois becomes 11th state to allow recreational marijuana

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — Illinois' new governor delivered on a top campaign promise Tuesday by signing legislation making the state the 11th to approve marijuana for recreational use in a program offering legal remedies and economic benefits to minorities whose lives critics say were damaged...

ENTERTAINMENT

High stakes for NBC News ahead of 2-night Democratic debate

NEW YORK (AP) — Don't envy NBC News executive Rashida Jones, who is behind this week's inaugural Democratic presidential debate and will have to juggle 20 candidates, five news personalities and, it's likely, one tweeting president.While the event is obviously important for politicians...

Fox's Hannity, Carlson enjoy Trump rally ratings bonanza

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Fox News hosts Sean Hannity and Tucker Carlson enjoyed a ratings surge from the channel's solo extended coverage of President Donald Trump's 2020 campaign kickoff.Viewers watching last week's rally in Orlando, Florida, helped cable star "Hannity" earn a rare top 10 showing...

Trump opponents turn the Mueller report into an art form

NEW YORK (AP) — Liz Zito is a multimedia artist so immersed in the Mueller Report that she wrote fan fiction to fill in the parts that were redacted by the Justice Department. When she worried that other Americans didn't know about the findings of special counsel Robert Mueller, she found...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Cardi B pleads not guilty to new charges in strip club brawl

NEW YORK (AP) — Grammy-winning rapper Cardi B was arraigned Tuesday on new felony charges in connection...

NASA to open moon rock samples sealed since Apollo missions

HOUSTON (AP) — Inside a locked vault at Johnson Space Center is treasure few have seen and fewer have...

Lebanese town bans Muslims from buying, renting property

BEIRUT (AP) — Mohammed Awwad and his fiancee, both Muslims, recently found an affordable apartment for rent...

Rome doctors warn of health hazards from city's garbage woes

ROME (AP) — Doctors in Rome are warning of possible health hazards caused by overflowing trash bins in the...

Germany: Suspect in politician's slaying says he acted alone

BERLIN (AP) — Germany's top security official says the far-right extremist suspected in the killing of a...

Australia media demand press freedom law reforms after raids

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia's three largest media organizations joined forces on Wednesday to...

McMenamins
Cristina Silva the Associated Press


Photo credit: Daniel James Clark

LAS VEGAS (AP) -- There are no police in riot gear here, no bulldozers leveling encampments.

In a city that celebrates behaving badly, Occupy Las Vegas protesters are touting civil obedience and government cooperation as anti-Wall Street efforts elsewhere have turned to violence and police confrontations.

Las Vegas demonstrators have sought approval from government leaders and police before protesting or setting up a camp site. They called off a protest during President Barack Obama's visit to Las Vegas last month because police asked them to do so. And they have created a system of protest rules that ban, among other things, law-breaking and hate signs.

The good behavior in Las Vegas and other Occupy efforts across Nevada is even more noteworthy because Nevadans may have the most cause to rage against the machine. The state tops the nation in foreclosures and unemployment and entire neighborhoods have been overtaken by vacant homes and storefronts.

But while protesters in other cities riot and rage, the Vegas group is hosting a series of free foreclosure mediation workshops for homeowners who are underwater on their mortgages.

Organizers insist their anti-greed message has a better chance of spreading if they aren't labeled violent anarchists.

"It's a combination of respect for the police and the general public, and it's a safety issue as well," said Jim Walsh, an unemployed truck driver volunteering as Occupy Las Vegas' self-appointed chief of security. "As a group we had voted that we were going to do this with non-violence and so far, not one person in our group has been arrested or sent to the hospital."

The peaceful spirit stands in stark contrast with the protests unfolding in other cities, notably in New York, where police arrested 200 protesters before dawn Tuesday and demolished the tent city that had anchored the movement. Police have also arrested protesters or shuttered camp sites in recent weeks in Ohio, Oklahoma, Utah, Oregon, Texas, Florida and California. In Dallas, an occupy campsite has been plagued by reports of chaos, including the alleged sexual assault of a child. In Oakland, a man was shot and killed near the encampment at the City Hall plaza. Police in Burlington, Vt., evicted protesters after a man fatally shot himself last week inside a tent.

To avoid similar showdowns or violent outbreaks in Las Vegas, protesters have met weekly with police. They forwarded their plans to police for review, and then tweaked their efforts when police suggested changes. One weekend, police asked if the occupiers could cancel a proposed protest on the Las Vegas Strip because city officials were expecting a large number of visitors. In a rare act of defiance, protesters went forward with the protest anyway - sort of. They moved it to Fremont Street, a smaller tourist haven in downtown Las Vegas.

"It's the mentality of that group that, `we can make a point without being arrested,'" said Lt. Jason Letkiewicz, the staff liaison between the protesters and the Las Vegas police department. "They don't want to be known as thugs."

It's not that Nevadans are incapable of mustering some old fashioned civil disobedience. They just don't want to be arrested or attacked by police.

"Some people have said, `why are we being so friendly to the police?'" said Robert Paulson, 21, a comedian who has lived at the Las Vegas camp for three weeks. "And it's like, it's cool. We got to do everything we want to do and we didn't get beat."

Fear that an ugly protest could further hurt Nevada's wounded economy has also restrained protesters.

"We don't want to chase tourists away from our city because that's where a lot of people's jobs come from," said David Peter, a union worker active in the Las Vegas movement.

Occupy Las Vegas was one of dozens of copycat movements created last month after protesters began gathering near Wall Street in downtown New York City to protest corporate greed, economic inequality and government corruption.

The first gathering drew hundreds of protesters to the Las Vegas Strip in October, as police officers on horses watched cautiously. Some protesters wore goggles and gas masks, expecting tear gas and police dressed in riot gear. But there were no arrests or fits of violence that night, and a group of self-appointed organizers quickly decided that they would only express themselves by peaceful demonstration at subsequent events.

"We are definitely trying to take an organized and non-violent approach to all of our actions," said organizer Kristal Glass. "I don't want to say that non-violent civil disobedience is not going to happen in this group, but if it happens it will be done in a manner where it is not disruptive to the community as a whole."

When county officials balked at protesters who wanted to occupy city parks, Glass signed a lease with the county allowing the movement to occupy an empty lot on a secluded street near the airport for 30 days. The contract required protesters to maintain clean portable bathrooms, obtain insurance and prohibit littering.

"This group has been unlike the others in lot of the other cities where there have been health and safety issues and violence," said Clark County Commissioner Steve Sisolak. "They have kept their word in terms of being accommodating, no one causing any trouble."

The Occupy Reno movement has received similar praise from city staff and law enforcement officials for obtaining a permit before setting up camp at a public park miles from the main downtown casino strip.

"There's a small group interested in the actual occupation," said organizer Steve Metcalf of Reno. "I think a much larger group is interested in talking about policies and the community and community service."

In Carson City, roughly 70 protesters opted against gathering on the lawn of the state Capitol after they were told that would require a costly insurance policy.

"We decided to hold off on that for now and just use the public sidewalks," said organizer Janette Dean. "For the size of our group, that seems to be plenty of space."

But it's unclear whether the peace pushers will be able to tame the more aggressive voices within the movement forever. A local militant group tried last week to convince the protesters in Las Vegas to arm themselves. Others have simply urged organizers to take a more forceful stand and stop being so darn nice.

Roussan Collins, 38, a homeless former math teacher, said the Las Vegas protesters have been too willing to concede to the police department's suggestions.

"They are not `Occupy' officially to me," said Collins, who had been living at the Las Vegas camp for three days. "I want them to take back the land, not lease it."

---

Associated Press writers Sandra Chereb in Carson City and Scott Sonner in Reno contributed to this report.

---

Cristina Silva can be reached at http://twitter.com/cristymsilva .

© 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Carpentry Professionals
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

The Skanner Photo Archives