06-17-2019  12:25 pm   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Progressive Climate Policy Poised to Pass in Oregon

Oregon is on the precipice of becoming the second state after California to adopt a cap-and-trade program, a market-based approach to lowering the greenhouse gas emissions behind global warming.

Photos: Oregon Welcomes Shakespeare Festival’s Newly Appointed Artistic Director

On Wednesday, June 12, the Oregon Shakespeare Festival hosted a reception at the Froelick Gallery to welcome newly appointed artistic director Nataki Garret.

Juneteenth Celebrations Expand Across Metro Area, State

Gresham, Vancouver events join decades-old Portland celebration of the effective end of slavery

Portland Black Pride in June

Midway through Pride Month, there are still a number of events throughout Portland that celebrate LGBTQ community members of color.

NEWS BRIEFS

National African American Reparations Commission, ACLU to Host Forum on Reparations

Forum to Follow Congressional Hearing on Bill to Form a Commission to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals ...

Must-See Shows Open in OSF Outdoor Theatre

New shows are Alice in Wonderland, Macbeth and All’s Well That Ends Well. ...

Roosevelt High School Students Earn National Recognition for Resiliency

Students from Roosevelt High School who recently started a storytelling and resiliency-building initiative have been invited to...

Seattle Art Museum Appoints Amada Cruz as New Director and CEO

The Board of Trustees of the Seattle Art Museum (SAM) announced today that Amada Cruz has been chosen as the museum’s new Illsley...

The Oregon Historical Society Presents a Lecture on Oregon’s Enigmatic Black History

Join the Oregon Historical Society for an evening exploring Oregon’s enigmatic history in relation to Blacks ...

All 7 of Oregon's public universities will raise tuition

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — All seven of Oregon's public universities will raise tuition for the 2019-2020 school year, with officials citing increased costs and less money than expected from legislators.The hikes range from 2.33% at Western Oregon University in Monmouth to 9.9% at Ashland's Southern...

Shooter fires at car after dispute at Oregon gas station

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Authorities say a car was struck by gunfire following a parking dispute at an Oregon gas station.The Oregonian/OregonLive reports a BMW sedan had stopped at gas station in Rock Creek northwest of Portland early Sunday.Washington County Sheriff's Detective Robert...

OPINION

U.S. Attempt to Erase Harriet Tubman

Traitors like Jefferson Davis and other Confederates are memorialized while a woman who risked her life time and again to free enslaved people is simply dismissed. ...

Watching a Father and Son

You must have seen this video of a father speaking with his pre-verbal son about the season finale of Empire. ...

The Congressional Black Caucus Must Oppose HR 246

If every tactic that was used by African Americans in the Civil Rights Movement and/or in the fight against apartheid South Africa was either criminalized or attacked by the US Congress, how would you respond? ...

Jamestown to Jamestown: Commemorating 400 Years of the African Diaspora Experience

We are now able to actualize the healing and collective unity so many generations have worked to achieve in ways which bring power to our communities in America, Africa and throughout our Diaspora. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Buttigieg returns to South Bend after man killed by police

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — A police officer fatally shot a black man in South Bend, Indiana, leading Mayor Pete Buttigieg to return home early from a presidential campaign trip to address the public and reach out to community members.The shooting happened early Sunday after someone called police to...

Search warrant cites synagogue shooter's hatred of Judaism

SAN DIEGO (AP) — The sole gunman in a Southern California synagogue shooting in which a woman was killed told an investigator he adopted his hatred of Judaism 18 months before the fatal attack, according to a federal search warrant.John T. Earnest, 19, also told a San Diego Sheriff's...

Sentencing moved up for man in deadly Charlottesville rally

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) — A sentencing hearing has been moved up for an avowed white supremacist convicted of federal hate crimes for plowing his car into a crowd of anti-racism protesters at a 2017 white nationalist rally in Virginia.James Alex Fields Jr. was originally scheduled to be...

ENTERTAINMENT

APNewsBreak: 'Hunger Games' prequel novel coming in 2020

NEW YORK (AP) — A decade after seemingly wrapping up "The Hunger Games," Suzanne Collins is bringing readers back to Panem. A prequel, set 64 years before the beginning of her multimillion-selling trilogy, is coming next year.The novel, currently untitled, is scheduled for release on May 19,...

Shania Twain set to party again in Vegas with new residency

NEW YORK (AP) — Since Shania Twain launched her first residency in Las Vegas seven years ago, Sin City has been invaded with contemporary pop stars, from Lady Gaga to Drake to Christina Aguilera, jumping on the residency trend. Even Cardi B has plans for a short-term Vegas residency this...

Taylor Swift's new video features Ellen, RuPaul and more

NEW YORK (AP) — Taylor Swift's new music video features a number of famous faces, including Ellen DeGeneres, Laverne Cox, RuPaul and the cast of "Queer Eye."The clip for her song "You Need to Calm Down," in which Swift calls out homophobes and her own haters, was released Monday.Ryan...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

APNewsBreak: 'Hunger Games' prequel novel coming in 2020

NEW YORK (AP) — A decade after seemingly wrapping up "The Hunger Games," Suzanne Collins is bringing...

Why US-China trade war risks hurting firms in both countries

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. businesses are imploring President Donald Trump not to expand his tariffs to 0...

Masked gunman opens fire on Dallas courthouse, then dies

DALLAS (AP) — A masked gunman opened fire Monday on a federal courthouse in downtown Dallas before being...

Sources: US to question Assange pal jailed in Ecuador

BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — U.S. investigators have received permission from Ecuador to question a Swedish...

Pakistani police target traffickers selling brides to China

FAISALABAD, Pakistan (AP) — At first, in her desperate calls home to her mother in Pakistan, Natasha Masih...

The Latest: Airbus is ready for autonomous planes; are you?

LE BOURGET, France (AP) — The Latest on the Paris Air Show (all times local):7 p.m.The chief salesman for...

McMenamins
Amy Westfeldt the Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) -- How can a movement that claims to speak for everyone turn anyone away? Occupy Wall Street is struggling with how to police unwelcome elements as sex arrests, hate speech and activists pushing causes from the Chinese Communist Party to gas drilling threaten to muddle its message.

The fires and shattered windows at protests in Oakland, Calif., a sex assault arrest in New York's Zuccotti Park and complaints of drug use elsewhere have drawn blanket statements from demonstrators against violence and unsafe behavior.

But to a large degree, the movement that welcomes everyone with a gripe against the system - any system - is embracing its fringe, saying protesters with causes unrelated to Occupy Wall Street are helping spur the revival of grassroots activism.

"From the very beginning, there have been many issues," said Bill Dobbs, a press liaison for Occupy Wall Street in New York. "Folks who had never thought of carrying a sign are out there on Broadway with signs about an issue that's important to them."

That includes Jimmy Chen, a mail man standing on a ledge at Zuccotti Park, his ankle tethered to the edge of a huge banner reading, "Just say No, Chinese Communist Party." He says the party is as corrupt as Wall Street and claims it even gives it money.

Antiwar signs also circle the tents in the Financial District, along with pleas to pay health insurance to ground zero workers, and for Pennsylvania to ban hydraulic fracturing, the controversial technique of injecting water and chemicals into the earth to drill for natural gas.

Several protesters objected to a sign weeks ago reading "Zionists Control Wall St," prompting letters from the Anti-Defamation League, but the movement has made no mission statement banning hate speech or any kind of speech.

In Washington, an antiwar group that began camping in a park in early October became publicly confused with an Occupy Wall Street encampment, and the two have gotten into spats over whose right it is to use the name. The groups now say they coexist peacefully and speak for much the same thing.

In Portland, Ore., many protesters complained of drug use, the presence of homeless and mentally ill, and the mayor wrote a letter to the movement this week warning the camp to control its behavior.

Protesters of Occupy Portland recently proposed limiting the number of people in camp to those who contribute to committees, but the idea went nowhere. Many said it was antithetical to the movement.

The movement is "walking the walk" and espousing its message of inclusion by allowing in anyone, provided they are not violent or disruptive, Portland organizer Reid Parham said.

"We let in former criminals, people who have criminal records," he said. "There's no use in locking them out if they have served their due process and served any judgment against them."

There's precedent in most grassroots movements to attract hangers-on and demonstrators seeking to publicize other causes or alter the message, including the antiwar and civil rights movements, activists and experts say. But Occupy Wall Street, priding itself on being leaderless and not subscribing to one unified voice, will struggle more to define itself against that backdrop, experts say.

"There have been other movements that are more disparate," said Mary Frances Berry, a University of Pennsylvania history professor and former chairwoman of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. "Most of them have specific goals. Most of them have identifiable leadership. ... Therefore, you didn't have this incoherence."

Berry, one of the founders of the Free South Africa movement in the 1980s, remembered a man who joined a protest with a sign protesting pedophilia by priests, while they lobbied for anti-apartheid measures.

"He would stand across the street with his sign," she said. "We didn't try to stop him. He was over there and he was doing his thing. People would show up with signs about poverty. ... We were clear because we had goals."

Dobbs, representing protesters in Zuccotti Park, said the movement espouses nonviolence and confrontations with police. The 1,000 or so arrests in New York have involved mainly trespassing charges. But "social change is never neat and pretty," and most of the movement continues to be focused on income inequality and anti-corporate greed, he said.

Zuccotti Park's encampment is relying largely on self-policing, with a self-styled security force that protesters can call when they're in trouble.

"Everybody's trying to take care of each other," said Rae Altman, 28, who came from Portland, Ore., to camp in New York. "If you don't know how to handle something, you can call out."

The protesters also call the police, resulting in last week's arrest of a 26-year-old man on charges he groped a teenager.

But demonstrators say the point of their protests is not unity of position, but in generating discussion. In Washington's Freedom Plaza, members of October2011 Stop the Machine held daily seminars on topics ranging from clean energy to food and water, transportation and the media.

The group initially began a protest to mark the 10th anniversary of the U.S. war in Afghanistan but has since pledged allegiance to Occupy D.C., even directing its website to the same domain name. A member of Occupy D.C.'s liaison committee, Janelle Treibitz, said the group was asked to keep a separate name.

In New York, diverse opinions on any cause are welcome, said Altman and her husband, Aaron. They said they left their jobs as bakers and baristas to learn about America and rejoin a community that has stopped debating its problems.

"This is an open space," Aaron Altman said. "If you have a problem with this current system, you can come to this open space.

"It's just a big conversation."

---

Associated Press writers Nigel Duara in Portland, Ore., and Ben Nuckols in Washington contributed to this report.

© 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Carpentry Professionals
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

The Skanner Photo Archives