08-09-2020  8:08 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Portland Protests Persist with Some Flashes of Violence

Tear gas was used by police on protesters Wednesday for the first time since the U.S. agents pulled back their presence

Reimagine Oregon Issues Equity Demands, Gains Legislative Support

Coalition of Black-led and Black-focused organizations takes new approach to concrete change 

Oregon Criminal Justice Commission: Initiative Petition 44 Will Nearly Eliminate Racial Disparities for Drug Arrests, Convictions

The initiative would expand access to drug addiction treatment and recovery services, and decriminalize low-level drug possession.

Inslee, Culp Advance to November Ballot in Governor's Race

In early returns, with nearly 17% of the vote, Loren Culp, the police chief of Republic, had the largest share among 35 other candidates.

NEWS BRIEFS

Vote.org Holds #GoodTroublePledge Voter Registration Drive to Commemorate the 55th Anniversary of the Voting Rights Act

2020 VRA anniversary observance to honor the memory of voting rights activist and late-Congressman John Lewis (D-GA) ...

White Democrats in Congress Falling Short on Reparations Bill

Democracy in Color releases “The White List” showing 79% of democratic House members haven’t cosigned HR 40 despite popular...

New Rule by The U.S. Department of Education Would Misdirect $11M from Oregon Public Schools

U.S. Rep. Suzanne Bonamici, Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley, and Reps. Peter DeFazio and Earl Blumenauer called a...

Barbara Bush Foundation Partners with Barbershop Books and Penguin to Provide Child-Friendly Reading Spaces in Baltimore and Detroit Barbershops

Developed in Harlem, Barbershop Books is a community-based program that leverages the cultural significance of barbershops in...

All Classical Portland Awards Grant to Support Emmanuel Henreid's 'Livin' in the Light'

Livin’ in the Light documents Onry’s experience as a Black, male, professional opera and crossover singer in Portland, Ore. ...

For pandemic jobless, the only real certainty is uncertainty

CHICAGO (AP) — For three decades, Kelly Flint flourished as a corporate travel agent, sending everyone from business titans to oil riggers around the planet. Then came the worst pandemic in a century, leaving her jobless and marooned in an uncertain economy.Furloughed since March, Flint has...

For pandemic jobless, the only real certainty is uncertainty

CHICAGO (AP) — For three decades, Kelly Flint flourished as a corporate travel agent, sending everyone from business titans to oil riggers around the planet. Then came the worst pandemic in a century, leaving her jobless and marooned in an uncertain economy.Furloughed since March, Flint has...

LSU adds Missouri, Vanderbilt in revamped SEC schedule

Defending Southeastern Conference and national champion LSU will host Missouri and visit Vanderbilt in its expanded Southeastern Conference schedule, while Alabama will visit Mizzou and host Kentucky in league play revised by the coronavirus pandemic. The league on Friday released two additional...

Missouri's Drinkwitz takes side in mask-or-no-mask debate

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Eli Drinkwitz has been the head coach at Missouri for just over seven months. He has yet to lead the Tigers onto the football field, much less win a game, yet his role in the community already has forced him to take some important stands.First, it was supporting his new...

OPINION

Da 5 Bloods and America Abroad

Even before I returned to the United States from my combat tour in Vietnam, I had decided that we were fighting an unjust war. ...

Falling Behind: COVID, Climate Change, and Chaos

Multiple Crises, Multiple Obstacles ...

Bill Deiz urges Oregonians to Defend their Constitutional Rights

Elements of federal police, sent in by our president, are nightly tormenting our citizens with tear gas, impact munitions, kidnappings and beatings, and other criminal acts, in order to suppress our rights of free speech and free assembly ...

The Power of Love

Powerful lessons for me today on forgiveness. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Missouri town divided by move to change its 'Savages' mascot

SAVANNAH, Mo. (AP) — A nearly all-white northwest Missouri town is divided over an effort to change its high school's “Savages” mascot that depicts a Native American amid a nationwide movement calling for racial justice.The high school had a “Savannah Savages”...

Amid pandemic, future of many Catholic schools is in doubt

NEW YORK (AP) — As the new academic year arrives, school systems across the United States are struggling to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic. Roman Catholic educators have an extra challenge — trying to forestall a relentless wave of closures of their schools that has no end in...

Rajapaksa sworn in as PM in Sri Lanka, cementing family rule

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka (AP) — Sri Lanka’s former President Mahinda Rajapaksa was sworn in as the prime minister for the fourth time Sunday after his party secured a landslide victory in parliamentary elections that cemented his family's hold on power. Rajapaksa took oath before his...

ENTERTAINMENT

Q&A: Cineworld CEO on re-opening Regal theaters in U.S.

Regal movie theaters have been closed for almost five months in the U.S. due to the coronavirus pandemic, but they are gearing up to open on Aug. 21. And this time it might just stick. Exhibitors have postponed plans several times as cases spiked in various cities. Mooky Greidinger, the CEO of...

Eminent scholar of early U.S., Bernard Bailyn, dies at 97

NEW YORK (AP) — Bernard Bailyn, a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and educator of lasting influence whose “The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution” transformed how many thought about the country’s formation, has died at 97.Bailyn's wife, Lotte, told The...

Lorenzo Soria, president of Golden Globes group, dies at 68

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Lorenzo Soria, president of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association and former editor of the Italian news weekly L’Espresso, died Friday, the association said. He was 68.Soria died peacefully at his Los Angeles home, the association said in a statement, lauding his...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Amid pandemic, future of many Catholic schools is in doubt

NEW YORK (AP) — As the new academic year arrives, school systems across the United States are struggling to...

Masks in class? Many questions as Germans go back to school

BERLIN (AP) — Masks during class, masks only in the halls, no masks at all. Distance when possible, no...

Trump orders encroach on Congress' powers, invite challenges

BEDMINSTER, N.J. (AP) — President Donald Trump has bypassed the nation's lawmakers as he claimed the...

Masks in class? Many questions as Germans go back to school

BERLIN (AP) — Masks during class, masks only in the halls, no masks at all. Distance when possible, no...

New Zealand marks 100 days of virus elimination

WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — New Zealand on Sunday marked 100 days since it stamped out the spread of the...

Starvation looms for Morocco's horses as tourism collapses

MARRAKECH, Morocco (AP) — Abdenabi Nouidi sold his favorite horse for 0 to help feed the others on the...

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Amy Westfeldt the Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) -- How can a movement that claims to speak for everyone turn anyone away? Occupy Wall Street is struggling with how to police unwelcome elements as sex arrests, hate speech and activists pushing causes from the Chinese Communist Party to gas drilling threaten to muddle its message.

The fires and shattered windows at protests in Oakland, Calif., a sex assault arrest in New York's Zuccotti Park and complaints of drug use elsewhere have drawn blanket statements from demonstrators against violence and unsafe behavior.

But to a large degree, the movement that welcomes everyone with a gripe against the system - any system - is embracing its fringe, saying protesters with causes unrelated to Occupy Wall Street are helping spur the revival of grassroots activism.

"From the very beginning, there have been many issues," said Bill Dobbs, a press liaison for Occupy Wall Street in New York. "Folks who had never thought of carrying a sign are out there on Broadway with signs about an issue that's important to them."

That includes Jimmy Chen, a mail man standing on a ledge at Zuccotti Park, his ankle tethered to the edge of a huge banner reading, "Just say No, Chinese Communist Party." He says the party is as corrupt as Wall Street and claims it even gives it money.

Antiwar signs also circle the tents in the Financial District, along with pleas to pay health insurance to ground zero workers, and for Pennsylvania to ban hydraulic fracturing, the controversial technique of injecting water and chemicals into the earth to drill for natural gas.

Several protesters objected to a sign weeks ago reading "Zionists Control Wall St," prompting letters from the Anti-Defamation League, but the movement has made no mission statement banning hate speech or any kind of speech.

In Washington, an antiwar group that began camping in a park in early October became publicly confused with an Occupy Wall Street encampment, and the two have gotten into spats over whose right it is to use the name. The groups now say they coexist peacefully and speak for much the same thing.

In Portland, Ore., many protesters complained of drug use, the presence of homeless and mentally ill, and the mayor wrote a letter to the movement this week warning the camp to control its behavior.

Protesters of Occupy Portland recently proposed limiting the number of people in camp to those who contribute to committees, but the idea went nowhere. Many said it was antithetical to the movement.

The movement is "walking the walk" and espousing its message of inclusion by allowing in anyone, provided they are not violent or disruptive, Portland organizer Reid Parham said.

"We let in former criminals, people who have criminal records," he said. "There's no use in locking them out if they have served their due process and served any judgment against them."

There's precedent in most grassroots movements to attract hangers-on and demonstrators seeking to publicize other causes or alter the message, including the antiwar and civil rights movements, activists and experts say. But Occupy Wall Street, priding itself on being leaderless and not subscribing to one unified voice, will struggle more to define itself against that backdrop, experts say.

"There have been other movements that are more disparate," said Mary Frances Berry, a University of Pennsylvania history professor and former chairwoman of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. "Most of them have specific goals. Most of them have identifiable leadership. ... Therefore, you didn't have this incoherence."

Berry, one of the founders of the Free South Africa movement in the 1980s, remembered a man who joined a protest with a sign protesting pedophilia by priests, while they lobbied for anti-apartheid measures.

"He would stand across the street with his sign," she said. "We didn't try to stop him. He was over there and he was doing his thing. People would show up with signs about poverty. ... We were clear because we had goals."

Dobbs, representing protesters in Zuccotti Park, said the movement espouses nonviolence and confrontations with police. The 1,000 or so arrests in New York have involved mainly trespassing charges. But "social change is never neat and pretty," and most of the movement continues to be focused on income inequality and anti-corporate greed, he said.

Zuccotti Park's encampment is relying largely on self-policing, with a self-styled security force that protesters can call when they're in trouble.

"Everybody's trying to take care of each other," said Rae Altman, 28, who came from Portland, Ore., to camp in New York. "If you don't know how to handle something, you can call out."

The protesters also call the police, resulting in last week's arrest of a 26-year-old man on charges he groped a teenager.

But demonstrators say the point of their protests is not unity of position, but in generating discussion. In Washington's Freedom Plaza, members of October2011 Stop the Machine held daily seminars on topics ranging from clean energy to food and water, transportation and the media.

The group initially began a protest to mark the 10th anniversary of the U.S. war in Afghanistan but has since pledged allegiance to Occupy D.C., even directing its website to the same domain name. A member of Occupy D.C.'s liaison committee, Janelle Treibitz, said the group was asked to keep a separate name.

In New York, diverse opinions on any cause are welcome, said Altman and her husband, Aaron. They said they left their jobs as bakers and baristas to learn about America and rejoin a community that has stopped debating its problems.

"This is an open space," Aaron Altman said. "If you have a problem with this current system, you can come to this open space.

"It's just a big conversation."

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Associated Press writers Nigel Duara in Portland, Ore., and Ben Nuckols in Washington contributed to this report.

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