11-27-2021  4:15 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

City’s Budget Windfall Means More for Police, Despite NAACP Demands

Group calls out lack of engagement from City Hall.

Oregon Resists Dropping Controversial Investments

Oregon residents are increasingly pushing for the state to divest from fossil fuel companies and other controversial investments, but the state treasury is resisting and putting the onus on the Legislature.

COVID-19: Oregon Drops Outdoor Mask Requirement

Oregon still has in place, a statewide indoor mask mandate for all public settings

Oregon Supreme Court Dismisses Challenge to Legislative Maps

The Oregon Supreme Court on Monday dismissed two challenges filed by Republicans to new state legislative districts approved by the Legislature in September.

NEWS BRIEFS

Vsp Global Partners With Black EyeCare Perspective to Eliminate Inequities and Increase Representation of People of Color in the Eye Care Industry

Partnership includes scholarships, leadership development, and outreach to prospective optometrists ...

Shop Local and Earn Free Parking With Parking Kitty

Find the purrfect gift for your loved ones by supporting small businesses and shopping local this holiday season, thanks to the...

Oregon Records More Than 5,000 COVID-19 Related Deaths

Today, Oregon health officials reported 103 new COVID-19 related deaths, bringing the state’s death toll to more than 5,000 ...

Northwest Library Site Acquired as Part of Multnomah County Library Capital Bond Projects

Location will help library move towards permanent spaces, expedite other bond projects ...

Four LGBTQ Leaders to Be Inducted Into Hall of Fame

Governor Kate Brown included in 2021 class of inductees to be honored at Victory Fund’s 30th Anniversary Gala ...

At least 1 injured in shooting at mall in Tacoma, Washington

TACOMA, Wash. (AP) — Gunshots rang out at a Washington state mall packed with Black Friday shoppers, seriously wounding one person and panicking hundreds of others who hid inside stores as the mall went into lockdown. Authorities said the shooting in Tacoma, south of Seattle,...

Skeptic to advocate: Man survives scary bout of COVID-19

MYRTLE CREEK, Ore. (AP) — Howard Breidenbach thought it was all a big conspiracy. The government using a so-called “coronavirus” to control the people. Feeding drama. Making up numbers. “It was all a lie,” he thought. Until he...

No. 25 Arkansas beats Missouri, caps best season since 2011

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) — Sam Pittman grinned for almost the entirety of his postgame press conference Friday night. The Arkansas coach and his team had done something no others ever had. The No. 25 Razorbacks capped their regular season with a 34-17 victory over Missouri,...

Mizzou's Drinkwitz returning to Arkansas for rivalry game

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) — Just 45 miles of interstate highway separate Eli Drinkwitz from where he started and where he is now as Missouri's head football coach. Raised in the small Arkansas town of Alma, Drinkwitz will come full circle Friday when his Tigers visit No. 25...

OPINION

State is Painting Lipstick on Its One-of-a-kind, Long-term-care Law

Starting in January, the unpopular law imposes a stiff new tax of 58 cents per 0 earned for every worker in the state ...

Giving Thanks

Just by being alive we can be sure of having moments of sadness as well as happiness. When you’re active in politics, you experience both wins and losses. Sometimes it can be hard to feel grateful. ...

Acting on Climate will Require an Emphasis on Environmental Justice

Climate change affects us all, but its effects aren’t distributed equally. ...

Small Businesses Cannot Survive With Current Level of Postal Service

At The Skanner News office we received an important piece of correspondence that was postmarked June 12, 2021, and delivered to us on November 4, 2021. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Solomon Islands violence recedes but not underlying tension

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Violence receded Friday in the capital of the Solomon Islands, but the government showed no signs of addressing the underlying grievances that sparked two days of riots, including concerns about the country's increasing links with China. Solomon...

Shots fired at police, journalists in Martinique COVID riots

PARIS (AP) — Shots were fired overnight at security forces and journalists on the French Caribbean island of Martinique amid violent protests against COVID-19 restrictions, France's interior minister said on Friday. Several police officers have been injured, Interior Minister...

Argentine movement tries to make Black heritage more visible

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — It wasn’t until Julia Cohen Ribeiro moved to Argentina that she discovered she was Black. Her hair was curly, but her skin was light. She had never identified as anything other than Brazilian in her country of birth. Then 11, she was shocked...

ENTERTAINMENT

Performers gear up for the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade

NEW YORK (AP) — Growing up in Chicago, Broadway star Brittney Mack faithfully watched the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade on TV after fulfilling her own parade duties. Now she's getting ready to bundle up, hit the streets of Manhattan and be part of the big one for the first time. ...

U2's Edge leading rock memorabilia sale to help musicians

NEW YORK (AP) — When The Edge saw the Rolling Stones perform recently, his mask allowed him to go unrecognized as he watched guitarist Ron Wood from the front row. “I have to say one of the benefits of mask wearing is it’s like a cloaking device if you’re a famous...

Q&A: Alana Haim lives out a Valley dream in ‘Licorice Pizza’

When Paul Thomas Anderson first mentioned to Alana Haim that he wanted to put her in a movie, she assumed it would be as an extra walking through the frame, or something. And she thought that would be pretty great. They’d gotten to know one another’s families over the...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

NOT REAL NEWS: A look at what didn't happen this week

A roundup of some of the most popular but completely untrue stories and visuals of the week. None of these are...

Activists block Amazon warehouses in Europe on Black Friday

Climate activists blockaded Amazon warehouses in three European countries on Friday, part of a global effort to...

Maxwell's brother says US prosecutors seeking to 'break' her

The brother of a British socialite charged with helping Jeffrey Epstein exploit underage girls says her...

US, 6 other nations urge tight ban on arms sales to Myanmar

BANGKOK (AP) — The United States and six other nations issued a joint statement Friday calling on the...

Ukraine leader alleges Russia-backed coup planned next week

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy on Friday claimed that his country's intelligence...

US lawmakers visit Taiwan; China conducts military patrols

TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — Five U.S. lawmakers met with Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen on Friday in a surprise...

Amy Westfeldt the Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) -- How can a movement that claims to speak for everyone turn anyone away? Occupy Wall Street is struggling with how to police unwelcome elements as sex arrests, hate speech and activists pushing causes from the Chinese Communist Party to gas drilling threaten to muddle its message.

The fires and shattered windows at protests in Oakland, Calif., a sex assault arrest in New York's Zuccotti Park and complaints of drug use elsewhere have drawn blanket statements from demonstrators against violence and unsafe behavior.

But to a large degree, the movement that welcomes everyone with a gripe against the system - any system - is embracing its fringe, saying protesters with causes unrelated to Occupy Wall Street are helping spur the revival of grassroots activism.

"From the very beginning, there have been many issues," said Bill Dobbs, a press liaison for Occupy Wall Street in New York. "Folks who had never thought of carrying a sign are out there on Broadway with signs about an issue that's important to them."

That includes Jimmy Chen, a mail man standing on a ledge at Zuccotti Park, his ankle tethered to the edge of a huge banner reading, "Just say No, Chinese Communist Party." He says the party is as corrupt as Wall Street and claims it even gives it money.

Antiwar signs also circle the tents in the Financial District, along with pleas to pay health insurance to ground zero workers, and for Pennsylvania to ban hydraulic fracturing, the controversial technique of injecting water and chemicals into the earth to drill for natural gas.

Several protesters objected to a sign weeks ago reading "Zionists Control Wall St," prompting letters from the Anti-Defamation League, but the movement has made no mission statement banning hate speech or any kind of speech.

In Washington, an antiwar group that began camping in a park in early October became publicly confused with an Occupy Wall Street encampment, and the two have gotten into spats over whose right it is to use the name. The groups now say they coexist peacefully and speak for much the same thing.

In Portland, Ore., many protesters complained of drug use, the presence of homeless and mentally ill, and the mayor wrote a letter to the movement this week warning the camp to control its behavior.

Protesters of Occupy Portland recently proposed limiting the number of people in camp to those who contribute to committees, but the idea went nowhere. Many said it was antithetical to the movement.

The movement is "walking the walk" and espousing its message of inclusion by allowing in anyone, provided they are not violent or disruptive, Portland organizer Reid Parham said.

"We let in former criminals, people who have criminal records," he said. "There's no use in locking them out if they have served their due process and served any judgment against them."

There's precedent in most grassroots movements to attract hangers-on and demonstrators seeking to publicize other causes or alter the message, including the antiwar and civil rights movements, activists and experts say. But Occupy Wall Street, priding itself on being leaderless and not subscribing to one unified voice, will struggle more to define itself against that backdrop, experts say.

"There have been other movements that are more disparate," said Mary Frances Berry, a University of Pennsylvania history professor and former chairwoman of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. "Most of them have specific goals. Most of them have identifiable leadership. ... Therefore, you didn't have this incoherence."

Berry, one of the founders of the Free South Africa movement in the 1980s, remembered a man who joined a protest with a sign protesting pedophilia by priests, while they lobbied for anti-apartheid measures.

"He would stand across the street with his sign," she said. "We didn't try to stop him. He was over there and he was doing his thing. People would show up with signs about poverty. ... We were clear because we had goals."

Dobbs, representing protesters in Zuccotti Park, said the movement espouses nonviolence and confrontations with police. The 1,000 or so arrests in New York have involved mainly trespassing charges. But "social change is never neat and pretty," and most of the movement continues to be focused on income inequality and anti-corporate greed, he said.

Zuccotti Park's encampment is relying largely on self-policing, with a self-styled security force that protesters can call when they're in trouble.

"Everybody's trying to take care of each other," said Rae Altman, 28, who came from Portland, Ore., to camp in New York. "If you don't know how to handle something, you can call out."

The protesters also call the police, resulting in last week's arrest of a 26-year-old man on charges he groped a teenager.

But demonstrators say the point of their protests is not unity of position, but in generating discussion. In Washington's Freedom Plaza, members of October2011 Stop the Machine held daily seminars on topics ranging from clean energy to food and water, transportation and the media.

The group initially began a protest to mark the 10th anniversary of the U.S. war in Afghanistan but has since pledged allegiance to Occupy D.C., even directing its website to the same domain name. A member of Occupy D.C.'s liaison committee, Janelle Treibitz, said the group was asked to keep a separate name.

In New York, diverse opinions on any cause are welcome, said Altman and her husband, Aaron. They said they left their jobs as bakers and baristas to learn about America and rejoin a community that has stopped debating its problems.

"This is an open space," Aaron Altman said. "If you have a problem with this current system, you can come to this open space.

"It's just a big conversation."

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Associated Press writers Nigel Duara in Portland, Ore., and Ben Nuckols in Washington contributed to this report.

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