09-23-2020  3:54 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
Trimet Take the Survey
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Seattle City Council Overrides Mayor's Veto of Policing Cuts

Seattle will reduce the police department’s budget and reallocate some money to community programs

US Judge Blocks Postal Service Changes That Slowed Mail

The Yakima, Washington judge called the changes “a politically motivated attack on the efficiency of the Postal Service” before the November election.

Black and Jewish Community Join to Revive Historic Partnership

United in Spirit Oregon brings together members of the NAACP, Jewish Federation of Greater Portland, others to serve as peacemakers 

Feds Explored Possibly Charging Portland Officials in Unrest

Federal officials were told that Portland police officers were explicitly told not to respond to the federal courthouse

NEWS BRIEFS

Black Leaders Endorse Sarah Iannarone for Portland Mayor

Iannarone seeks to unseat an embattled Mayor Ted Wheeler, who has increasingly high unfavorable approval ratings. ...

Today in History: Senate Confirms Nomination of First Female Justice to Supreme Court

On Sept. 21, 1981, the Senate unanimously confirmed the nomination of Sandra Day O’Connor to become the first female justice on the...

Free Masks and Gloves Now Available for Small Businesses

Businesses with fewer than 50 employees that are headquartered in Oregon with principal operations in Oregon are eligible. ...

Forest Service Explains 'Containment'

US Forest Service, Riverside Fire provides a special update to explain how they achieve wildfire containment. ...

Oregon Receives Approval of Federal Disaster Declaration for Wildfires

Decision will enable federal aid to begin flowing, as unprecedented wildfires ravage state and force evacuation of thousands ...

Portland denies permit for right-wing rally, cites COVID-19

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Portland, Oregon, has denied a permit for a Saturday rally planned by the right-wing group Proud Boys.The city found the group’s estimated crowd size of 10,000 people was too big under coronavirus safety measures, according to a statement released Wednesday by...

Latest Oregon revenue forecast increases by [scripts/homepage/home.php] billion

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Oregon economists presented a “shocking” and significantly improved revenue forecast Wednesday, which could leave the state's current budget nearly unscathed by the economic impacts of COVID-19. Despite the forecast, which is [scripts/homepage/home.php] billion more than predicted in...

Mizzou's Drinkwitz: transparency trumps competitive edge

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Eli Drinkwitz could have kept private the COVID-19 testing numbers within the Missouri football program.The new coach of the Tigers could have pleaded ignorance when it came to the number of positive results, or the amount of contact tracing that has been done. He...

College Football Picks: SEC start in most unusual season

The Southeastern Conference is set to kick off its 10-game, league-only schedule, making this Saturday the most normal-feeling yet of a most unusual season. As of Wednesday, all the SEC openers were still on. The Big 12 and Atlantic Coast Conference were also scheduled to have all their teams...

OPINION

ACLU Statement on Breonna Taylor Grand Jury Verdict

Carl Takei, senior staff attorney with the ACLU’s Criminal Law Reform Project, issued a statement about today's charges ...

True Justice Denied to Police Murder Victim Breonna Taylor, Greenlining Institute Says

The organization's president and CEO releases a response to today’s announcement of only minor charges -- "wanton endangerment" -- for one of the Louisville police officers who shot and killed Breonna Taylor. ...

Defeating a Demagogue: A Reminder from History

Mel Gurtov dedicates this column to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, whom he calls "a warrior for human rights, decency, and the rule of law" ...

SPLC Statement on the Passing of Rev. Robert S. Graetz Jr.

Graetz was the only white clergyman to publicly support the Montgomery Bus Boycott ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Portland denies permit for right-wing rally, cites COVID-19

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Portland, Oregon, has denied a permit for a Saturday rally planned by the right-wing group Proud Boys.The city found the group’s estimated crowd size of 10,000 people was too big under coronavirus safety measures, according to a statement released Wednesday by...

Celebs, long vocal about Breonna Taylor case, decry decision

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — For months, actors, sports stars, musicians and other celebrities have been using their platforms to call for justice in the police shooting death of Breonna Taylor, including at Sunday's Emmy Awards. Her picture was used on the cover of O:The Oprah Magazine this year...

Police officers not charged for killing Breonna Taylor

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — A Kentucky grand jury brought no charges against Louisville police for the killing of Breonna Taylor during a drug raid gone wrong, with prosecutors saying Wednesday that two officers who fired their weapons at the Black woman were justified in using force to protect...

ENTERTAINMENT

Success of Ginsburg film inspires CNN look at John Lewis

NEW YORK (AP) — Indirectly, the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg inspired CNN Films' new documentary on the life of civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis.The unexpected commercial success of the “RBG” film in theaters two years ago had CNN looking for another...

Thomas Rhett, Kelsea Ballerini, Luke Combs top CMT noms

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Ashley McBryde, Dan + Shay, Kelsea Ballerini, Luke Combs, Sam Hunt and Thomas Rhett top the 2020 CMT Music Awards nominations with three each.In nominations announced Wednesday for the pandemic-delayed show, 14 videos are vying for the top prize of video of the year....

Celebs, long vocal about Breonna Taylor case, decry decision

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — For months, actors, sports stars, musicians and other celebrities have been using their platforms to call for justice in the police shooting death of Breonna Taylor, including at Sunday's Emmy Awards. Her picture was used on the cover of O:The Oprah Magazine this year...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Utility equipment eyed as possible source of fire near LA

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Federal investigators are looking into whether a huge wildfire near Los Angeles was...

Trump, social media, right-wing news stir up antifa scares

LEITCHFIELD, Ky. (AP) — The group gathered around the town square, waiting for the arrival of what has...

Former staffer: White House politicized Bolton book review

WASHINGTON (AP) — Trump administration officials repeatedly exerted political pressure in an unsuccessful...

'The port came to us': Story behind AP photo of Beirut blast

JIYYEH, Beirut (AP) — When Mustafa Kinno felt the ground shake and heard the deafening blast toward the...

Cold diggers? UN finds a record low in Greenland ice in 1991

GENEVA (AP) — For all the recent talk of global warming, climate historians hunting for past temperature...

They said it: Leaders at the virtual UN, in their own words

Lots of leaders saying lots of things about lots of topics — topics that matter to them, to their regions,...

Don't Call the Police for domestic disturbances
Trimet Take the Survey
Kasie Hunt and Shannon Mccaffrey the Associated Press

YPSILANTI, Mich. (AP) -- Republican Herman Cain met voters for the first time since sex harassment claims engulfed his upstart presidential bid as an aggressively supportive grass-roots crowd came out Thursday to cheer him and jockey with a horde of media.

Cain was touring Michigan tea party groups all day, his first campaign swing since the story broke late last month. He's aiming to hold on to the grassroots spark that catapulted him to the top of the GOP field before the allegations of sexual harassment became public.

"How you beat Obama? Beat him with a Cain!" the Georgia businessman told one supporter as he pushed through the crowd at the Blue Sky Diner toward a back exit. The crowd cheered Cain's comments.

When a reporter asked him to clarify what he meant, Cain said: "Cain. Herman Cain, C-A-I-N. Do I have to connect all the dots for you?"

"First real black man!" one supporter shouted several times as Cain took the microphone in the cramped and crowded restaurant. Organizers had to turn away some supporters.

"I don't believe any of the bull. I think it's just a slam," Kathy McConnell, a retired truck driver from Sumter, said of the allegations that have rocked Cain's campaign the past two weeks.

The crowd - and Cain's security detail - jockeyed with photographers and reporters pressed into the small diner. Cain's security guard reached out and pushed a reporter who was trying to listen to the candidate.

"Don't touch me, lady," the guard said as he asked for the reporter's removal.

"You're a little liar!" the tea party's photographer shouted at the reporter as the jostling continued.

Cain has denied the allegations and made an oblique reference to them at the diner. "Since they can't kill my ideas, they are trying to attack my integrity," he told the crowd. His supporters were rejecting the claims, he said, because "they are sick of gutter politics."

He also apologized anew for calling House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi "Princess Nancy" during a debate Wednesday night.

Far from backing down in the face of his challenges, Cain has hired a fierce new lawyer to help him fight the four women's claims "in the court of public opinion." And he's pushing forward with a more aggressive campaign strategy to get his message out, airing his first television ad in Iowa and preparing to sign a lease on a cavernous new campaign office in Atlanta that will serve as a hub for volunteers.

Even so, there are signs that the accusations that he sexually harassed women when he led a Washington trade group more than a decade ago could be causing Cain's luster to dim. Uneasiness is growing among Republicans less than two months before voting begins in Iowa.

Private polling shared with The Associated Press shows Cain's support in Iowa has declined since last month. Internal polls of likely Republican caucus-goers showed Cain's support consistent with The Des Moines Register's poll in late October, which showed him narrowly leading in the state with 23 percent. The private polls showed Cain still in double digits in Iowa, but markedly lower.

The scandal also was filtering down to the grass roots in Iowa, where volunteers were proceeding with nightly calls to potential supporters armed with a response to questions about the allegations. Volunteers were told to echo Cain's denial of wrongdoing.

"When we are trying to convince someone to be a team leader, we answer their questions," said Steve Grubbs, Cain's Iowa campaign chairman. "The answer to that is: Tell them what Herman Cain is saying."

The Cain camp seemed to be making efforts to shore up support among women, including by rolling out the endorsement of a prominent Republican female state lawmaker in his home state of Georgia, Renee Unterman.

The campaign also released his first TV ad of the season in Iowa, and another web ad focused on his signature 9-9-9 tax overhaul plan.

And Georgia state director David McCleary said the campaign would sign a lease Friday for a new 4,200-square-foot office space that would coordinate Cain's volunteer efforts, with phone banks to call voters in early states like Iowa.

McCleary said that since the allegations broke "I've had more people call and volunteer, saying `How can I help?'"

Cain's new lawyer, Lin Wood, could provide polish and focus to a candidate who struggled to stick to a consistent version of events as the story broke.

In an interview with The Associated Press, the Atlanta-based lawyer whose high-profile roster of clients has included the family of Jon Benet Ramsey and wrongly accused Olympic park bomber Richard Jewell, said he would help the campaign "evaluate and respond to" the women's claims.

"Mr. Cain is being tried in the court of public opinion based on accusations that are improbable and vague," Wood told The AP. "The media - bless your heart - you turn our system of justice into one of guilt by accusation."

But Republicans worry privately about Cain's impact on a nominating contest that's about to start in earnest. While no one is rushing to push him out of the race and he has vowed to remain a candidate, the chorus is growing for the former pizza company executive to explain the allegations of unwanted sexual advances that have come to light more than a decade after they are said to have happened.

"It's one of the he-said-she-said stories," said GOP strategist Greg Mueller. "But you want to put the story to rest as quickly as you can and let the voters decide. It seems like every day it's a new elevation of the story. Either that's going to peter out or it's going to solidify."

Cain's day with tea party groups was also taking him to Grand Rapids and Traverse City, according to organizers. Tea party backers form the core of his support and many have said recently that they give no credence to the allegations against him.

Four women have said Cain sexually harassed them in the 1990s when he headed the National Restaurant Association. Two have come forward publicly, including one who had filed a sex harassment claim.

----

Associated Press writers Philip Elliott in Washington and Thomas Beaumont in Des Moines, Iowa, contributed to this report. McCaffrey reported from Atlanta.

----

Follow Kasie Hunt at http://www.twitter.com/kasie and Shannon McCaffrey at http://www.twitter.com/smccaffrey13

© 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

OR Lottery OPG 2020
AARP Vote 2020
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

Multnomah County Breastfeeding