06-17-2019  4:24 pm   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Progressive Climate Policy Poised to Pass in Oregon

Oregon is on the precipice of becoming the second state after California to adopt a cap-and-trade program, a market-based approach to lowering the greenhouse gas emissions behind global warming.

Photos: Oregon Welcomes Shakespeare Festival’s Newly Appointed Artistic Director

On Wednesday, June 12, the Oregon Shakespeare Festival hosted a reception at the Froelick Gallery to welcome newly appointed artistic director Nataki Garret.

Juneteenth Celebrations Expand Across Metro Area, State

Gresham, Vancouver events join decades-old Portland celebration of the effective end of slavery

Portland Black Pride in June

Midway through Pride Month, there are still a number of events throughout Portland that celebrate LGBTQ community members of color.

NEWS BRIEFS

National African American Reparations Commission, ACLU to Host Forum on Reparations

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Must-See Shows Open in OSF Outdoor Theatre

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Roosevelt High School Students Earn National Recognition for Resiliency

Students from Roosevelt High School who recently started a storytelling and resiliency-building initiative have been invited to...

Seattle Art Museum Appoints Amada Cruz as New Director and CEO

The Board of Trustees of the Seattle Art Museum (SAM) announced today that Amada Cruz has been chosen as the museum’s new Illsley...

The Oregon Historical Society Presents a Lecture on Oregon’s Enigmatic Black History

Join the Oregon Historical Society for an evening exploring Oregon’s enigmatic history in relation to Blacks ...

Oregon House proposes oil train fees to fund spill planning

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The Oregon House of Representatives Monday passed a bill that would create new fees on oil train cars to pay for spill prevention and planning in the state.The House passed the bill on a 55-3 vote, according to a report by The Oregonian/OregonLive, sending it to the state...

Police: Bodies of mom, son found where boy's father cut wood

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The bodies of an Oregon mother and her 3-year-old son have been found more than a month after they vanished, hidden in a forest where the boy's father cut wood, authorities said Monday."Really good detective work" led authorities to find the bodies of Karissa and Billy...

OPINION

U.S. Attempt to Erase Harriet Tubman

Traitors like Jefferson Davis and other Confederates are memorialized while a woman who risked her life time and again to free enslaved people is simply dismissed. ...

Watching a Father and Son

You must have seen this video of a father speaking with his pre-verbal son about the season finale of Empire. ...

The Congressional Black Caucus Must Oppose HR 246

If every tactic that was used by African Americans in the Civil Rights Movement and/or in the fight against apartheid South Africa was either criminalized or attacked by the US Congress, how would you respond? ...

Jamestown to Jamestown: Commemorating 400 Years of the African Diaspora Experience

We are now able to actualize the healing and collective unity so many generations have worked to achieve in ways which bring power to our communities in America, Africa and throughout our Diaspora. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Buttigieg goes home to South Bend after man killed by police

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The fatal shooting of a black man by a police officer in the Indiana city where Pete Buttigieg is mayor presents both political peril for a presidential candidate who has struggled to connect with minority voters and an opportunity to show leadership on issues of race and...

Combat vets in jury pool for decorated Navy SEAL's trial

SAN DIEGO (AP) — Combat veterans from the Navy and Marines were among possible jurors Monday in the trial of a decorated Navy SEAL charged with killing an Islamic State prisoner in his care in Iraq.All but one of the potential jurors in the court-martial of Special Operations Chief Edward...

Harvard pulls Parkland grad's admission over racist comments

BOSTON (AP) — A survivor of the Parkland school shooting announced Monday that Harvard University withdrew his admission over racist comments he made in a shared Google Doc and text messages nearly two years ago.In a series of posts on Twitter, Kyle Kashuv shared several letters he received...

ENTERTAINMENT

Taylor Swift's new video features Ellen, RuPaul and more

NEW YORK (AP) — Taylor Swift's new music video features a number of famous faces, including Ellen DeGeneres, Laverne Cox, RuPaul and the cast of "Queer Eye."The clip for her song "You Need to Calm Down," in which Swift calls out homophobes and her own haters, was released Monday.Ryan...

Megadeth's Dave Mustaine says he has throat cancer

NEW YORK (AP) — Megadeth's Dave Mustaine says he has been diagnosed with throat cancer.The singer and guitarist of the heavy metal band announced the news on social media Monday, writing that he's "working closely with my doctors, and we've mapped out a treatment plan which they feel has a...

'Emanuel' explores life after tragic church shooting

NEW YORK (AP) — Jennifer Pinckney was hiding under a desk holding the mouth of her then-6-year-old daughter when Dylann Roof fired more than 70 shots in Mother Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, killing nine black worshippers.The new documentary, "Emanuel," explores life after...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Scientists take a peek behind those sad puppy dog eyes

NEW YORK (AP) — What's behind those hard-to-resist puppy dog eyes?New research suggests that over thousands...

Police: 4 shot, 2 arrested at Raptors rally in Toronto

TORONTO (AP) — Four people were shot and wounded at a rally Monday for the NBA champion Raptors, and two...

Blackout in South America raises questions about power grid

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — The huge blackout that left tens of millions of people in the dark in...

Pakistani police target traffickers selling brides to China

FAISALABAD, Pakistan (AP) — At first, in her desperate calls home to her mother in Pakistan, Natasha Masih...

Overcrowding, abuse seen at Mexico migrant detention center

TAPACHULA, Mexico (AP) — The 36-year-old Cuban mechanic's eyes glazed over as he recalled his time at the...

The Latest: Airbus is ready for autonomous planes; are you?

LE BOURGET, France (AP) — The Latest on the Paris Air Show (all times local):7 p.m.The chief salesman for...

McMenamins
Lisa Leff the Associated Press

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) -- Protesters are carrying out a series of marches across Oakland on Wednesday to make a statement about the power and unity of the anti-Wall Street movement as they team up with labor unions to picket banks, take over foreclosed homes and vacant buildings and disrupt operations at the nation's fifth-busiest port.

Occupy Oakland participants, elected officials and business leaders expressed optimism that the widely anticipated "general strike" would be a peaceful event for a city that last week became a rallying point after police used tear gas to clear an encampment outside City Hall and then clashed with protesters in the street. An Iraq War veteran was injured in the melee.

"We are expecting the marches and demonstrations to remain peaceful, and the police department's and the city's role is to facilitate that process," city spokesman Karen Boyd said. "We have done that many times in the past. We've seen many, many instances of peaceful protests, peaceful expressions."

Along with protesting financial institutions that many within the Occupy Wall Street movement blame for high unemployment and the foreclosure crisis, supporters of the Oakland events are expanding their message to focus on local school closures, waning union benefits and cuts to social services. Nurse, teacher and longshoremen unions are taking part in the protests, and Oakland is letting city workers use vacation or other paid time off to take part in the general strike.

Demonstrators in Los Angeles, New York, Chicago and Philadelphia said they planned to hold solidarity actions Wednesday.

The day's events in Oakland are expected to begin with the first of three rallies scheduled by strike organizers and culminate with a march to the Port of Oakland, where local protesters said the goal would be to stop work there in time for the 7 p.m. evening shift.

Organizers say they want to halt "the flow of capital" at the port, a major point of entry for Chinese exports to the U.S. It's too early to tell how much port operations will be disrupted or how many port workers will walk off the job. Union members could recognize the Occupy demonstration as a picket line and refuse to cross it on Wednesday night, said Stan Woods, a spokesman for the longshoremen's union in Oakland.

Other demonstrators, some affiliated with established community groups, said they planned to target banks, convene a dancing flash mob, sponsor music and street parties, march with elderly residents and people with disabilities to the California state office building, hold youth teach-ins and take over foreclosed homes and vacant city buildings.

Because of the activities' free-flowing and unpredictable nature, city leaders said they had no idea how many people would take part or how much a disruption they could pose to the daily routines of residents and workers. Boyd said the government "will be open for business as usual" and was encouraging businesses to do the same.

But the president of the police officers' union said he was worried officers were being scapegoated by Mayor Jean Quan and "set to fail" if Wednesday's actions got unruly. "We're going to be seen as the establishment, and it's not fair to the police, it's not fair to anyone," Oakland Police Officer's Association President Sgt. Dom Arotzarena told The Associated Press.

On Oct. 25, police acting at the request of the city's administrator, who reports to the mayor, were asked to clear the protesters' campsite during an early morning raid. A confrontation with marchers protesting the raid followed that night, and an Iraq War veteran suffered a fractured skull and brain injury when officers moved in with tear gas, flash grenades and beanbag projectiles.

Quan allowed protesters to reclaim the plaza outside City Hall the next day. At least six dozen tents and a kitchen buzzing with donated food have been erected on the spot since then, while the crackdown has galvanized anti-Wall Street events elsewhere and made politicians in other cities think again about interfering with their local encampments.

Occupy LA, a monthlong 475-tent encampment around Los Angeles City Hall, is planning a 5:30 p.m. march and rally through downtown LA's financial district to express solidarity with the Oakland general strike and to protest police brutality.

"It was obvious to the entire world that the acts perpetrated against Oakland occupation were acts of police brutality," said Julia Wallace, spokeswoman for the Committee to End Police Brutality at Occupy LA.

Quan said in a statement Tuesday that she was working with interim Police Chief Howard Jordan to ensure that the protesters issues remain "front and center" on Wednesday.

"The pro-99 percent activists - whose cause I support - will have the freedom to get their message across without the conflict that marred last week's events," Quan said.

Unions representing city government workers, Oakland's public school teachers, community college instructors, and University of California, Berkeley teaching assistants all have endorsed the daylong work stoppage and encouraged their members to participate.

"It's sort of a realization that a lot of people are having that we've all been fighting our own issues, but really, it's all related, it's all the same issue," Oakland Education Association Secretary Steve Neat said.

The Oakland Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce released an open letter to the mayor Tuesday in which President Joseph Haraburda expressed concern for "the mothers and children, and even grandmothers, who plan to come to Oakland to conduct their regular business" and for business owners who "must face a day of uncertainty" if they do not close for the strike.

"We want to be clear, should Wednesday's planned protests go awry, someone will need to be held accountable," Haraburda said.

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Associated Press writers Terry Collins in Oakland, Beth Duff-Brown in San Francisco and Christina Hoag in Los Angeles contributed to this report.

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