06-16-2021  6:37 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Portland Police Officer Indicted Over August 2020 Use of Force Incident

Officer Corey Budworth has been charged with one count of Assault in the Fourth Degree for alleged criminal conduct that occurred during a protest.

MacKenzie Scott, Citing Wealth Gap, Donates $2.7 Billion

This is the third round of major philanthropic gifts Scott has made, which together rival the charitable contributions made by the largest foundations

Oregon GOP Legislator Ousted Over State Capitol Breach

Republican lawmakers voted with majority Democrats in the Oregon House of Representatives to expel an unapologetic Rep. Mike Nearman with a 59-1 vote.

Senator Lew Frederick: Juneteenth Senate Floor Speech

Sen. Frederick carried HB 2168 in the Oregon Senate, and gave a moving floor speech, illustrated with treasured family photos, prior to the Senate vote on June 1.

NEWS BRIEFS

Severe Blood Shortage: Donors Needed Now to Address Delays in Patient Care

New effects of pandemic leading to significant drop in nation’s blood supply ...

Employment Department’s Domain Registration Expires

The Oregon Employment Department’s website for posting economic data went away over the weekend, apparently because the state...

Student-led Nonprofit is Seeking High Schoolers to Join its 'Summer Action Team'

Formed in 2020 in response to COVID-19, the Portland Student Pandemic Response provides space for students to make a lasting impact...

Oregon DOJ’s 2021 “Community Conversations” Series Underway

Listening sessions seek input on improvements to victim services ...

Christopher R. Upperman Joins Advocacy Organization Law Champs

Upperman, formally in the Obama administration as well as on the Biden Harris transition team and currently Manager, is currently...

Oregon Gov. Brown signs human composting bill

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Oregon Gov. Kate Brown has signed a bill passed by the Legislature legalizing human composting. Brown signed House Bill 2574 on Tuesday, which will legalize what’s also known as natural organic reduction, KOIN-TV reported. It also clarifies rules...

Climate change threat: Mount Rainier white-tailed ptarmigan

MOUNT VERNON, Wash. (AP) — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes listing a bird found in the North Cascades as threatened under the Endangered Species Act due to the likelihood that climate change will shrink its high-elevation habitat throughout the state. The Mount...

OPINION

Rx Upper Payment Limit Bill Will Worsen Chronic Disease for Oregonians Most at Risk

A measure being considered by Oregon state legislature will perpetuate a harmful trend for Oregon’s communities of color. ...

COMMENTARY: 100 Days of Biden-Harris

I see the trillion price tag on the Biden legislation as more of an investment than simple spending. ...

Power and Pride to the People!

Happy Pride month to Black LGBTQ readers and to all of us who love LGBTQ people! ...

You Are Not an Imposter

felt I didn’t belong and secretly, I was waiting for the program to tell me that they made a mistake in my admission. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

South Africa marks anniversary of Soweto student protests

JOHANNESBURG (AP) — South Africa's high rate of unemployment has cast a pall over Youth Day, the holiday honoring the 45th anniversary of the Soweto student protests which played a key role in ending apartheid, the previous regime of racist, minority rule. On June 16, 1976,...

Video shows man apologized before Honolulu police shot him

HONOLULU (AP) — Doorbell camera video obtained and made public by lawyers representing the family of a man fatally shot two months ago by Honolulu police provides more information about the events that unfolded before the deadly encounter with officers. The footage shows that...

After enrollment dips, public schools hope for fall rebound

Ashley Pearce’s daughter was set to start kindergarten last year in Maryland’s Montgomery County school system. But when it became clear that the year would begin online, Pearce found a nearby Catholic school offering in-person instruction and made the switch. Now Pearce is...

ENTERTAINMENT

New York Philharmonic to resume performances Sept. 17

NEW YORK (AP) — The New York Philharmonic will resume subscription performances in September following a historic 18-month gap caused by the coronavirus pandemic, presenting a shortened schedule of 78 concerts in a season shifted from Lincoln Center’s David Geffen Hall while the orchestra’s...

Winfrey, Hearst have Black journalists tell elders' stories

NEW YORK (AP) — Oprah Winfrey and Hearst Magazines are teaming up for interviews that pair young Black journalists with elders who include civil rights activists, celebrities and others sharing some lessons learned in life. The project, “Lift Every Voice,” will be featured...

Winfrey's new book pick is novel 'The Sweetness of Water'

NEW YORK (AP) — Oprah Winfrey's next book club pick is a debut novel set in Georgia at the end of the Civil War: Nathan Harris' “The Sweetness of Water.” “One of my great joys is finding a new author whose work I can share and support,” Winfrey said Tuesday in a...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Durant's sensational performance sends Nets to 3-2 lead

NEW YORK (AP) — Kevin Durant has always been one of the NBA's most unstoppable scorers. The...

British lawyer Karim Khan sworn in as ICC's chief prosecutor

THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — British lawyer Karim Khan was sworn in Wednesday as the new chief prosecutor for...

China set to send first crew to new space station Thursday

JIUQUAN, China (AP) — The three members of the first crew to be sent to China's space station say they're eager...

Experts: UK is losing race to adapt to climate change

LONDON (AP) — Britain is losing the race to adapt to the inevitable effects of climate change, including...

Germany buys Dubai asset data in fight against tax evasion

BERLIN (AP) — Germany's finance minister has ordered the purchase of data on Germans with assets in Dubai as...

China set to send first crew to new space station Thursday

JIUQUAN, China (AP) — The three members of the first crew to be sent to China's space station say they're eager...

Errin Haines the Associated Press

ATLANTA (AP) -- Police guarded newly-cleared plazas early Wednesday in Atlanta and Oakland, Calif., after clearing Occupy Wall Street protest camps in both cities. Dozens of demonstrators were arrested in swift crack-downs by riot squads after local authorities lost patience with the rallies.

Helicopters hovered and trained spotlights on downtown Atlanta as police in riot gear moved into a small city park just after midnight and arrested more than 50 protesters who had been there in tents for about two weeks.

Police and some neighbors in cities around the country have started losing patience as protesters prepare to settle in for winter in camps without running water or working toilets. Businesses and residents near New York's Zuccotti Park, the unofficial headquarters of the movement that began in mid-September, are demanding something be done to discourage the hundreds of protesters from urinating in the street and making noise at all hours.

In Oakland, riot police cleared protesters from in front of City Hall on Tuesday morning, leaving a sea of overturned tents, protest signs and trash strewn across the plaza. Hundreds of officers and sheriff's deputies went into the two week-old encampment with tear gas and beanbag rounds around 5 a.m., police said.

Eighty-five people were arrested, mostly on suspicion of misdemeanor unlawful assembly and illegal camping. About 170 protesters were at the site.

Early Wednesday, police stood guard and metal barricades surrounded Atlanta's Woodruff Park, which was where - like in many American cities - protesters had camped out to rally against what they see as corporate greed and a wide range of other economic issues. Before police marched in, protesters were warned a couple times around midnight to vacate the park or risk arrest.

Inside the park, the warnings were drowned out by drumbeats and chants of "Our park!"

Organizers had instructed participants to be peaceful if arrests came, and most were. Many gathered in the center of the park, locking arms, and sang "We Shall Overcome," until police led them out, one-by-one to waiting buses. Some were dragged out while others left on foot, handcuffed with plastic ties.

Oakland was less peaceful. Police fired tear gas and beanbag rounds as they cleared out the makeshift city Tuesday. After nightfall, protesters gathered at a downtown library and began marching toward City Hall in an attempt to re-establish a presence in the area of the disbanded camp.

They were met by police in riot gear. Officers cleared the area by firing tear gas over a roughly three-hour stretch of evening scuffles.

In Atlanta, State Sen. Vincent Fort was among those arrested after coming to the park in support of the protesters. He said the police presence was "overkill."

"He's using all these resources ... This is the most peaceful place in Georgia," Fort said, referring to Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed. "At the urging of the business community, he's moving people out. Shame on him."

Police included SWAT teams in riot gear, dozens of officers on motorcycles and several on horseback. By about 1:30 a.m. Wednesday the park was mostly cleared of protesters.

"It's real simple: This is a crisis of priorities that this small group of campers ... is the greatest threat in this city. It's outrageous," said organizer Tim Franzen.

The protesters who were arrested have bond hearings at Atlanta Municipal Court starting at 8 a.m., the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. Several protesters with signs waited outside the courtroom for the hearings to begin.

Reed said he was upset over an advertised hip-hop concert that he said drew 600 people to the park over the weekend but didn't have a permit and didn't have security guards to work the crowd, calling it irresponsible.

Reed told reporters he had serious security concerns that he said were heightened Tuesday when a man was seen in the park with an assault rifle. The mayor said authorities could not determine whether the weapon was loaded, and were unable to get additional information about it.

An Associated Press reporter talked to the man with the gun slung across his back earlier Tuesday as he walked in the park. He wouldn't give his name, but said he was an out-of-work accountant who doesn't agree with the protesters' views, but was there, armed, because he wanted to protect the rights of people to protest. There's no law that prevents him from carrying the weapon in public, but several police followed him for about 10 minutes before moving off.

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Associated Press reporters Terry Collins in Oakland, Calif., and Marcus Wohlsen contributed to this report

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