12-08-2022  1:40 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Merkley Introduces Bill to Ban Private Equity Firms from Predatory Housing Practices

End Hedge Fund Control of American Homes Act seeks to return single-family housing stock to families.

US Judge Gives Initial Victory to Oregon's Tough New Gun Law

A federal judge delivered an initial victory to proponents of a sweeping gun-control measure to take effect this week while giving law enforcement more time to set up a system for permits

Tough Oregon Gun Law Faces Legal Challenge, Could Be Delayed

Midterm voters narrowly passed one of the toughest gun control laws in the nation, but the new permit-to-purchase mandate and ban on high-capacity magazines faces a lawsuit that could put it on ice just days before it's set to take effect.

Portland Approves $27M for New Homeless Camps

Public opposition to the measure and the money that will fund it has been heated, with critics saying it will criminalize homelessness and fail to address its root causes.

NEWS BRIEFS

Volunteers of America Oregon Receives Agility Grant From the National Council on Problem Gambling

The funds will support the development of a Peer Driven Problem Gambling Prevention Campaign targeting high school and college-age...

Commissioner Jayapal Invites Community Members for Coffee

Multnomah County Commissioner will be available for a conversation on priorities and the county's work ...

GFO African-American Special Interest Group Meeting to Feature Southern Claims Commission

The Dec. 17 meeting of the Genealogical Forum of Oregon will feature Shelley Viola Murphy, PhD via ZOOM. Murphy will discuss the...

Charter Commission Concludes Study, Issues Report

The Portland Charter Commission have concluded their two-year term referring nine proposals to the November 2024 election and...

PBS Genealogy Show Seeks Viewers’ Brick Walls

The popular PBS show “Finding Your Roots” is putting out a nationwide casting call for a non-celebrity to be featured on season...

Oregon high court declines to overturn decision on gun law

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The Oregon Supreme Court late Wednesday declined to overturn a lower court judge’s decision and allow a tough new voter-approved gun law to take effect this week. Chief Justice Martha Walters denied the emergency motion to intervene filed earlier in the day...

Gov. extends emergency order as respiratory illnesses surge

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Oregon Gov. Kate Brown is extending a state of emergency as a surge of respiratory illnesses in adults and children — including RSV, the flu and COVID-19 — strains hospitals. The executive order issued Wednesday calls for the Oregon Health Authority and other...

Saxen's 19 help Saint Mary's knock off Missouri State 66-46

MORAGA, Calif. (AP) — Mitchell Saxen's 19 points helped Saint Mary's defeat Missouri State 66-46 on Wednesday. Saxen had six rebounds for the Gaels (7-3). Aidan Mahaney scored 13 points and Alex Ducas finished with nine points. Chance Moore led the Bears (4-5) in...

Purdue Fort Wayne takes down Southeast Missouri State 89-68

CAPE GIRARDEAU, Mo. (AP) — Jarred Godfrey scored 19 points as Purdue Fort Wayne beat Southeast Missouri State 89-68 on Wednesday night. Godfrey had eight rebounds and five assists for the Mastodons (6-4). Bobby Planutis scored 14 points, and Quinton Morton-Robertson had 13. ...

OPINION

‘I Unreservedly Apologize’

The Oregonian commissioned a study of its history of racism, and published the report on Oct. 24, 2022. The Skanner is pleased to republish the apology written by the editor, Therese Bottomly. We hope other institutions will follow this example of looking...

City Officials Should Take Listening Lessons

Sisters of the Road share personal reflections of their staff after a town hall meeting at which people with lived experience of homelessness spoke ...

When Student Loan Repayments Resume, Will Problems Return Too?

HBCU borrowers question little loan forgiveness, delays to financial security ...

Tell the Supreme Court: We Still Need Affirmative Action

Opponents of affirmative action have been trying to destroy it for years. And now it looks like they just might get their chance. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Pennsylvania panel to vote on proposal defining sex, race

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Pennsylvania government regulations would be revised with extensive definitions of sex, religious creed and race under a proposal set for a vote on Thursday — a change some Republican lawmakers see as an overreach on a subject they think should not be addressed without...

Family sues over police killing of Black Michigan motorist

DETROIT (AP) — A white Grand Rapids police officer who shot and killed a Black motorist during a traffic stop last spring had no reason to pull him over, attorneys for the motorist's family said after filing a federal civil rights lawsuit Wednesday. Christopher Schurr, who was fired...

Friction over LGBTQ issues worsens in global Anglican church

Friction has long-simmered within the global Anglican Communion over its 42 provinces’ sharp differences on whether to recognize same-sex marriage and ordain LGBTQ clergy. The divisions widened this year as conservative bishops affirmed their opposition to LGBTQ inclusion and demanded...

ENTERTAINMENT

Will Smith's 'Emancipation' role taught him lesson post-slap

LOS ANGELES (AP) — While filming “Emancipation,” Will Smith routinely drew inspiration from the words “sacred motivation” that were written on the front page of a script. But the Oscar winner heavily leaned on the phrase even more in recent months, as he tried to overcome the backlash to...

Apple Music offers a chance to sing with your favorites

NEW YORK (AP) — Apple Music wants to help you and your friends sing along to your favorite songs with a new feature it's rolling out just as people gather for end-of-year parties. Apple Music Sing gives the user the ability to adjust a song's vocals and an enhanced beat-by-beat...

Sharpton says film debuts at 'critical point' in US politics

NEW YORK (AP) — The Rev. Al Sharpton has been called a lot of names in his public life: a hustler, a racist, an opportunist, a fraud, a rat, a jester. He embraces at least one of the intended insults, a name often hurled by his critics on the right and the left: “Loudmouth.”...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Lebanese banks battered by meltdown struggle to survive

BEIRUT (AP) — Lebanon’s once burgeoning banking sector has been hard hit by the country’s historic economic...

Georgia vote gives Harris reprieve as Senate tiebreaker

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Kamala Harris needed to get to the U.S. Senate to break a tie. But first she...

EXPLAINER: China's relaxed 'zero-COVID' brings big changes

BEIJING (AP) — In a move that caught many by surprise, China announced a potentially major easing of its rigid...

South Korea widens back-to-work orders on striking truckers

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea’s government expanded its back-to-work orders Thursday against thousands...

Australia wants Indonesia to monitor released bombmaker

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia's government on Thursday said it was seeking assurances from Indonesia that...

Under China's 'zero COVID,' uncertainty reigns and unsettles

TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — As coronavirus cases rose in Shanghai earlier this year and the city's lockdown stretched...

Kasie Hunt the Associated Press

LAS VEGAS (AP) -- Herman Cain has risen fast. Now the question is: Will he fall?

The businessman has been facing intense scrutiny in recent weeks as his poll numbers have soared. He likely will face tough questions - on his professional past and his issue positions as well as his viability - when he gathers on stage later Tuesday with his Republican presidential foes for the latest GOP debate.

Cain is the latest GOP hopeful to enthrall the party faithful who haven't rallied behind Mitt Romney.

The former Massachusetts governor is seen as the Republican to beat. He has turned in strong debate performance after strong debate performance. He's fundraising steadily and adding establishment supporters nationally and also in early primary states.

But that hasn't kept the party's base from searching for an alternative.

Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann had a quick rise - after a sharp debate performance in New Hampshire - and a quick fall after she won a key test vote in Iowa. And Texas Gov. Rick Perry was embraced by most Republicans when he announced his bid in August, but has faded after a series of missteps.

Cain, a former pizza company executive, says he's different than other candidates who've faded, and that his years of speaking to tea party rallies and other conservative groups have built a grassroots support base.

His years spent public speaking, hosting a radio talk show and aligning himself with groups like Americans for Prosperity - whose funding comes in part from the billionaire Koch brothers - boosted his profile in conservative circles. But those appearances also created a huge record of statements on issues that rivals are certain to mine if they start to believe that he has staying power - and look for ways to derail him.

Since becoming a national figure, Cain's already run into the kind of trouble he was able to avoid before when he wasn't in the spotlight.

His tax plan - which he called 9-9-9 - already has been derided by Democrats and Republicans alike. The plan would scrap the current tax code and replace it with a 9 percent tax on personal income and corporations as well as a new 9 percent national sales tax.

Over the weekend, Cain acknowledged that he was "not familiar" with neoconservatism during an appearance on NBC's "Meet the Press." Cain identified two foreign policy hands he admires - John Bolton and Henry Kissinger - but those two men have fundamentally different philosophical approaches.

And Cain also had to apologize for comments he made over the weekend calling for an electric fence on the Southern border with Mexico.

At a campaign stop Monday in Arizona, Cain appeared with Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, an aggressive anti-immigration proponent.

"It was a joke," Cain said emphatically during a news conference. "I apologize if I offended anyone. Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea culpa."

Cain had told an audience in Tennessee that the fence is "going to be electrified. And there is going to be a sign on the other side that says, `It will kill you.'"

Immigration already has flared on the campaign trail - and has contributed to the sinking of another fast-rising GOP candidate.

Perry has struggled to explain why he signed a law giving in-state tuition breaks to illegal immigrants at Texas universities.

Also participating in Tuesday's debate are Romney, Perry, Bachmann, Texas Rep. Ron Paul, former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich.

Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman wasn't planning to be on stage; he's boycotting the Nevada caucuses in defense of New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation primary. Nevada has scheduled its contest for Jan. 14, and Republican officials are pressuring Romney and other Republicans to join Huntsman's boycott if the state refuses to hold the caucuses later in January.

Romney has faced pressure from New Hampshire leaders to join that boycott.

Also potentially at issue on Tuesday is the foreclosure crisis.

So far, it's been almost forgotten on the campaign trail, but the candidates will probably have little choice but to address it. Nevada has the nation's highest unemployment rate, a statistic that's driving the highest foreclosure rate in the nation. It's the root of the economic crisis, but it barely has been discussed as issues like immigration and vaccines for children have dominated the GOP primary.

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