08-15-2020  6:30 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
ODOT I-205 toll home pg
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Portland State Disarms Campus Police Two Years After Black Man's Death

In June 2018, two campus officers fatally shot Jason Washington, a Navy veteran, while he was trying to break up a fight outside a bar off-campus.

City Awards $548,000 in Cannabis Revenue to BIPOC-Focused Organizations

Six groups receive grants to focus on restorative justice, closing income gap. 

PHOTOS: Snapshots From Downtown Portland

View a slideshow of recent photos taken by The Skanner downtown Portland.

Prosecutor Won't Act on Low-level Portland Protest Arrests

At least several hundred people who have been arrested in the past few months will not face criminal prosecution.

NEWS BRIEFS

Girl Scouts of the USA Announces First Black CEO In Its 108-Year History

Judith Batty follows in the footsteps of Gloria Dean Randle Scott, Ph.D., who was elected as the first Black national president of...

Wyden, Colleagues Announce College Athletes Bill of Rights

Landmark proposal would guarantee fair and equitable compensation, enforceable safety standards and improved educational opportunities...

Oregon Continues Sending Families Pandemic School Meal Benefits

More than 230,000 students have received benefits in six weeks. ...

Ryan Narrowly Wins Over Smith for Portland Commissioner, Position 2

Dan Ryan will fill the seat on the Portland City Council previously held by Nick Fish. ...

MISSING: Michael Bryson Was Last Seen August 5

The Eugene man was last seen at campground SE of Cottage Grove ...

Cars getting towed at crowded recreation areas, trailheads

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Public officials in Oregon and Washington have a warning for people visiting trailheads and recreation areas across the region this weekend: park illegally and you might get towed. The U.S. Forest Service tweeted a photo Thursday showing a car being towed from a...

Portland police declare unlawful assembly amid protests

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Portland police declared an unlawful assembly Friday night and ordered protesters to leave, saying people were throwing things at officers. Anyone ignoring the order could face arrest or crowd control methods such as tear gas, police said. Police have been targeted with...

LSU adds Missouri, Vanderbilt in revamped SEC schedule

Defending Southeastern Conference and national champion LSU will host Missouri and visit Vanderbilt in its expanded Southeastern Conference schedule, while Alabama will visit Mizzou and host Kentucky in league play revised by the coronavirus pandemic. The league on Friday released two additional...

Missouri's Drinkwitz takes side in mask-or-no-mask debate

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Eli Drinkwitz has been the head coach at Missouri for just over seven months. He has yet to lead the Tigers onto the football field, much less win a game, yet his role in the community already has forced him to take some important stands.First, it was supporting his new...

OPINION

Historians Offer Context, Caution on Lessons 1918 Flu Pandemic Holds for COVID

Scholars find parallels of inequitable suffering between pandemic of 1918 and pandemic of 2020 ...

US Reps Adams and DeFazio Call on Postmaster General to Resign

The legislators say Trump appointee Louis DeJoy is sabotaging the US Postal Service and could harm the election ...

Da 5 Bloods and America Abroad

Even before I returned to the United States from my combat tour in Vietnam, I had decided that we were fighting an unjust war. ...

Falling Behind: COVID, Climate Change, and Chaos

Multiple Crises, Multiple Obstacles ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

AP FACT CHECK: Trump skews record on Biden-Harris, economy

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump greeted the Democratic presidential ticket of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris this past week with a litany of distortion and falsehoods, raging against cases of voting fraud where they didn't exist and declining to quash conspiracy theories about...

Georgia park with Confederate sculpture shuts gates to rally

ATLANTA (AP) — Suburban Atlanta's Stone Mountain Park, home of a giant sculpture of Confederate leaders, says it will close its gates Saturday in the face of a planned right-wing rally.The event has sparked fears of violence, especially before an all-Black militia said earlier this week that...

Freeman's legacy endures long after Sydney's flame went out

In a momentary pause between reality sinking in and her victory celebrations fully starting, Cathy Freeman looked toward a track official and twirled her index finger to signal a full circuit.It wasn’t a question of if, but for how long.Within seconds, she had an Australian flag and the...

ENTERTAINMENT

J Balvin says he is recovering from the coronavirus

NEW YORK (AP) — Colombian superstar J Balvin says he is recovering after battling the coronavirus.In a pre-taped video that aired Thursday night as Balvin accepted an award at Premios Juventud 2020, the performer revealed he contracted COVID-19 and that it impacted him heavily.“At...

Dev Patel celebrates India from his Los Angeles front yard

LONDON (AP) — Quarantine brought opportunities to Dev Patel’s front yard.From a safe distance, the British actor was able to enjoy both his birthday and his relationship with India without leaving his L.A. home.The first was courtesy of his girlfriend, Australian actress Tilda...

'Succession' star Nicholas Braun writes a virus dating song

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Actor Nicholas Braun, who plays fan favorite Cousin Greg on HBO’s “Succession,” has captured the fraught nature of dating during the pandemic in a catchy new punk song that started as a joke. “If you come within 6 feet, it’s mask on, mask...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Fewer people but deep faith on Greece's Assumption holiday

TINOS, Greece (AP) — In twos and threes, in small groups or alone, they came. Most walking, many crawling,...

Partner of dead Belarus protester believes police shot him

MINSK, Belarus (AP) — The partner of a man who died in the protests engulfing Belarus says she does not...

Delaware thrust into unlikely starring role in 2020 campaign

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — Delaware isn't a swing state. It has three electoral votes. Driving its entire...

Pompeo inks deal for US troop move from Germany to Poland

WARSAW (AP) — U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Saturday sealed a defense cooperation deal with Polish...

Fewer people but deep faith on Greece's Assumption holiday

TINOS, Greece (AP) — In twos and threes, in small groups or alone, they came. Most walking, many crawling,...

Japan marks 75th anniversary of war end with no Abe apology

TOKYO (AP) — Japan on Saturday marked the 75th anniversary of its surrender in World War II, with Emperor...

ODOT I-205 toll
McMenamins
Jesse Washington AP National Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Standing beneath the looming presence of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., President Barack Obama carved out his own version of black leadership with a message of racial unity.

A sense of inescapable blackness surrounded Sunday's dedication ceremony for the King memorial. The 30-foot-tall granite likeness is the first on the National Mall to honor an African-American, joining memorials for two white presidents who owned slaves and a third who ended such bondage.

Obama responded by stirring the loyalty of his restive black base while reaching to include all Americans, linking himself to King's "constant insistence on the oneness of man" and the slain leader's efforts to help not just black people, but all those in need.

He used the colorblind suggestion that Americans look at the hard times King conquered, and understand the challenge of navigating the troubles of today.

"At this moment, when our politics appear so sharply polarized, and faith in our institutions so greatly diminished, we need more than ever to take heed of Dr. King's teachings," Obama said. "He calls on us to stand in the other person's shoes, to see through their eyes, to understand their pain."

At times, it seemed as if the shoes to which Obama alluded were his.

He drew subtle parallels between himself and the man in stone behind him, the "black preacher with no official rank or title" who helped shape "an America that is far more fair and more free and more just" than it was in 1963, when King delivered his iconic "I Have A Dream" speech on that same Mall.

"Even after rising to prominence, even after winning the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King was vilified by many ... He was even attacked by his own people," Obama said.

The black Nobel Peace Prize winner who never held elected office, as seen by the black Nobel Peace Prize winner elected to the highest office in the land.

"We are right to savor that slow but certain progress," Obama said. "... And yet it is also important on this day to remind ourselves that such progress did not come easily; that Dr. King's faith was hard-won; that it sprung out of a harsh reality and some bitter disappointments."

Unlike his other infrequent remarks on race, which were mostly responding to problems, Obama set his own terms on Sunday.

He did not explore America's racial dynamics or cite lingering racial barriers, as he did during the 2008 campaign to counteract remarks by his pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah Wright. Nor did he chide his black critics, as he did in a speech before the Congressional Black Caucus last month.

Fifty-nine words into Sunday's remarks, Obama uttered the word "black" - something his African-American critics have hungered for him to do more often. He called out the names of deceased movement luminaries such as Rosa Parks, Dorothy Height and the Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth. He let his body language speak, too, rocking pensively to Aretha Franklin's stirring performance of "Precious Lord Take My Hand," and linking arms with his wife and the vice president to sing "We Shall Overcome."

In the process, he satisfied at least one of his strongest black critics.

"He was sho' nuff black," said Michael Eric Dyson, a Georgetown professor who in the past has said that Obama "runs from race like a black man runs from a cop."

"He dipped down into the resourceful pool of black oratory, soared high, and expressed the courage of blackness against the bastion of white supremacy and injustice and transcended color to join us all together," Dyson said after the speech.

Rep. John Lewis, the Georgia Democrat who worked shoulder-to-shoulder with King, said Obama did with King's memory "exactly what I hoped he would do."

King "truly believed in the dignity of all human beings. It didn't matter if you were black, white, Latino, Native American," Lewis said.

Along with many other speakers at Sunday's ceremony, Lewis noted that at the time of King's assassination, he was working to build a multiracial coalition that would bring a "poor people's campaign" to the National Mall.

"There was a parallel (in Obama's speech) with what he's going through now, too," Lewis said. "When President Obama was running for office there was a low moment in his campaign, and he said, `I have to go back to my authentic self.' I think what we saw here was authentic Obama. It was very powerful."

Powerful without dwelling directly on black or white, said Colin Powell, the Republican and first black secretary of state under President George W. Bush.

"This wasn't a speech about race," Powell said. "It was a speech about the future of America. He touched all the bases: where we have been, where we are going, where we are now, and where we have to be."

Not everyone was impressed. David Kairys, a Temple University law professor and civil rights attorney who attended King's 1963 March on Washington, wished Obama had provided a clear reckoning of remaining racial problems.

"This specific occasion is about the struggle against racial oppression," Kairys said, then mentioned that black unemployment is twice the white rate and blacks still suffer disproportionately from many social ills.

"We eliminated the worst forms of explicit racism and it became taboo to be racist, but the results of segregation and Jim Crow were basically left in place and just continued over the last 40 or 50 years," he said. "That's at least worth some kind of direct comment."

Yet he understood, in some way, why Obama made that choice: "To be fair, he's running for reelection. Also, he never told us he was going to be a champion against racial oppression. This (speech) is probably who he really is."

Most others were more complimentary. Even the conservative talk show host Mike Gallagher, who is determined to defeat the president in 2012, said that the way Obama honored King's legacy was "brilliant."

"It was a beautiful, powerful message about what can be achieved in this country," Gallagher said. "I really appreciate the fact that he acknowledged as a black man how much progress we've made. . And it kills me to say this, because I think Obama is wrecking the country."

Paul and Carol Cooper, a white retired couple from Kingston, NY, heard King's "Dream" speech in person in 1963. Before Sunday's speech, they had hoped Obama would discuss the work still undone to fulfill King's dream.

On Sunday, Paul Cooper called Obama's remarks a "classic."

"Obama showed us repeatedly," he said, "that King belongs not merely to black people, but to the whole country."

---

Jesse Washington covers race and ethnicity for The Associated Press. He is reachable at http://www.twitter.com/jessewashington or jwashington(at)ap.org.

© 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Port of Seattle S King County Fund
image of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
Burnside Bridge Project
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

MMT Albina

Kevin Saddler