03-31-2020  6:51 pm   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Inslee: Washington Needs More Coronavirus Test Supplies

The governor suggested the shutdown of most businesses and extreme social distancing would likely have to be extended to fight the disease

Trump Approves Major Disaster Declaration for Oregon

Gov. Brown praised the declaration, but says we still have significant requests pending, "first and foremost Oregon's request for more personal protective equipment from the national stockpile"

Vote by May 19: Oregon’s Primary Election Continues as Planned

Oregon’s vote-by-mail system keeps May Primary on schedule

A Black Woman Is Leading The Charge To Create A Vaccine For The Coronavirus

Dr. Kizzmekia Corbett and her team have begun running the first human trials of the vaccine in Seattle

NEWS BRIEFS

Oregon Medicaid Program Gains Flexibility to Better Serve Low-income Oregonians During Pandemic

Nearly one in four Oregonians currently receives health coverage through OHP. ...

Washington Elementary School Offers Food-Bearing Container Gardens During Meal Distribution

Large pots with food-bearing plants will be available for families to take home on Wednesday, April 1, from Catlin Elementary in...

Waterfront Blues Festival Cancelled for 2020

Organizers say the decision to cancel the popular festival was not taken lightly ...

NAACP Calls COVID-19 Stimulus Package a Necessary Step, but Calls Upon Congress to Do More

The NAACP says in providing future relief, Congress must prioritize people first, not corporations ...

CARES Act Must Prioritize Nation’s Most Vulnerable Communities

The Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law says the new bill puts the interests of corporations above the burdens faced by...

Magnitude 6.5 earthquake strikes in Idaho

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A large earthquake struck north of Boise, Idaho, Tuesday evening, with people across a large area reporting shaking. The U.S. Geological Survey reports the magnitude 6.5 temblor struck just before 5 p.m. It was centered 73 miles (118 kilometers) northeast of Meridian,...

Oregon schools to start distance learning on April 13

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Facing an expected closure through the end of the academic year, schools across Oregon have been told to begin distance learning on April 13. Some schools are already handing out smart tablets and Wi-Fi devices to students.Gov. Kate Brown closed schools through April 28,...

The Latest: 2 Madison Square Garden boxing cards called off

The Latest on the coronavirus outbreak's affect on sports around the globe (all times EDT):10 p.m.Two boxing cards at Madison Square Garden have been called off because of the coronavirus outbreak.A few hours after announcing the fights would proceed without crowds, promoter Bob Arum said Thursday...

Former AD, All-American center Dick Tamburo dies at 90

EAST LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Dick Tamburo, an athletic director at three major schools and an All-American center at Michigan State, has died. He was 90.Michigan State announced that Tamburo died Monday.A native of New Kensington, Pennsylvania, Tamburo served as the athletic director at Texas...

OPINION

The ACA Has Never Been More Critical

Today I'm honoring the 10th anniversary of the Affordable Care Act being signed into law. ...

NAACP/Black Community: A Model for Resiliency

As America enters perhaps the most uncertain period in modern history, we will all be tested in new and unpredictable ways. ...

What the Government Can Do Now to Lessen the Impact of COVID-19

Dr. Roger Stark says during this pandemic the administration must give states more flexibility ...

The Homelessness Crisis – We Are Better Than This

Julianne Malveaux says this is not just about homelessness. It is about an economic crisis that has made affordable housing, jobs and economic security difficult to obtain ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Judge: Man linked to white supremacist group to stay in jail

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — A Maryland man linked by the FBI to a white supremacist group and arrested ahead of a gun rights rally in Virginia must remain in federal custody while he awaits trial, a judge ruled Tuesday.U.S. Magistrate Judge Deborah Boardman refused to set bond for Brian Mark...

Democratic lawmakers call for racial data in virus testing

Democratic lawmakers are calling out an apparent lack of racial data that they say is needed to monitor and address disparities in the national response to the coronavirus outbreak.In a letter sent Friday to Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Rep. Ayanna...

Man, 72, dies of injuries 3 months after Hanukkah stabbings

MONSEY, N.Y. (AP) — A man who was among the five people stabbed during a Hanukkah celebration north of New York City has died three months after the attack, according to an Orthodox Jewish organization and community liaison with a local police department.Josef Neumann, 72, died Sunday night,...

ENTERTAINMENT

CNN's Cuomo says he has coronavirus, has shown symptoms

NEW YORK (AP) — CNN's Chris Cuomo has tested positive for the coronavirus but promised Tuesday to stay at work and do his prime-time show from the basement of his home.Cuomo, whose brother New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has logged just as much television airtime lately with daily briefings on...

Finances hurting? Watch 'Let's Make a Deal'

NEW YORK (AP) — Instead of watching their own finances crater, shut-in television viewers tuned in to the game show “Let's Make a Deal” in record numbers last week.TV programs across the dial recorded superlatives last week with a captive audience of millions of Americans told...

'It is brutal': Hollywood's rank-and-file on the pandemic

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The red carpets are rolled up in storage, the A-listers holed up in mansions, multiplex doors are closed. For now, at least, the coronavirus has shut down much of Hollywood. And for the entertainment industry's many one-gig-at-a-time staff and freelance workers — a...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

AP FACT CHECK: Trump's misfires on virus death rates, tests

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing a grim reality of surging coronavirus cases, President Donald Trump is making...

A guide to surviving financially as the bills come due

The coronavirus has dealt a financial blow to millions of Americans and now April's bills are coming due.The good...

Should you wear mask in public if not sick with coronavirus?

WASHINGTON (AP) — If you’re not sick with the new coronavirus, should you wear a mask in public?...

13-year-old shot dead; Kenyan police enforcing curfew blamed

NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — The bullet struck the 13-year-old as he stood on the balcony of his family’s...

UN chief says COVID-19 is worst crisis since World War II

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned Tuesday that the world faces the most...

Dismantling democracy? Virus used as excuse to quell dissent

BELGRADE, Serbia (AP) — Soldiers patrol the streets with their fingers on machine gun triggers. The army...

McMenamins
Jay Reeves the Associated Press


The Montgomery Public Schools headquarters.
In Montgomery County, more than more than 200
Hispanic students were absent on a recent morning.

 

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) -- Hispanic students have started vanishing from Alabama public schools in the wake of a court ruling that upheld the state's tough new law cracking down on illegal immigration.

Education officials say scores of immigrant families have withdrawn their children from classes or kept them home this week, afraid that sending the kids to school would draw attention from authorities.

There are no precise statewide numbers. But several districts with large immigrant enrollments - from small towns to large urban districts - reported a sudden exodus of children from Hispanic families, some of whom told officials they would leave the state to avoid trouble with the law, which requires schools to check students' immigration status.

The anxiety has become so intense that the superintendent in one of the state's largest cities, Huntsville, went on a Spanish-language television show Thursday to try to calm worried parents.

"In the case of this law, our students do not have anything to fear," Casey Wardynski said in halting Spanish. He urged families to send students to class and explained that the state is only trying to compile statistics.

Police, he insisted, were not getting involved in schools.

In Montgomery County, more than 200 Hispanic students were absent the morning after the judge's ruling, and a handful have withdrawn. In tiny Albertville, 35 students withdrew from school in one day. About 20 students either withdrew or told teachers they were leaving in Shelby County, in suburban Birmingham.

Local and state officials are pleading with immigrant families to keep their children enrolled. The law does not ban anyone from school, they say, and neither students nor parents will be arrested for trying to get an education.

But so far, many Spanish-speaking families aren't waiting around to see what happens.

A school worker in Albertville - a community with a large poultry industry that employs many Hispanic workers - said Friday many families might leave town over the weekend for other states. About 22 percent of the community's 4,200 students are Hispanic.

"I met a Hispanic mother in the hallway at our community learning center this morning, where enrollment and withdrawal happens. She looked at me with tears in her eyes. I asked, `Are you leaving?' She said `Yes,' and hugged me, crying," said the worker, who spoke on condition of anonymity because she was not an authorized spokeswoman.

In Russellville, which has one of the largest immigrant populations in the state because of its poultry plants, overall school attendance was down more than 2 percent after the ruling, and the rate was higher among Hispanic students.

There's "no firm data yet, but several students have related to their teachers that they may be moving soon," said George Harper, who works in the central office.

Schools in Baldwin County, a heavily agricultural and tourist area near the Gulf Coast, and in Decatur in the Tennessee Valley also reported sudden decreases in Hispanic attendance.

The law does not require proof of citizenship to enroll, and it does not apply to any students who were enrolled before Sept. 1. While most students are not affected, school systems are supposed to begin checking the status of first-time enrollees now.

The state has distributed to schools sample letters that can be sent to parents of new students informing them of the law's requirements for either citizenship documents or sworn statements by parents.

In an attempt to calm fears that the law may lead to arrests, the letter tells parents immigration information will be used only to gather statistics.

"Rest assured," the letter states, "that it will not be a problem if you are unable or unwilling to provide either of the documents."

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Associated Press writers Steve Gutkin in Atlanta and Phillip Rawls in Montgomery contributed to this report.

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