07-16-2020  9:57 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

I-5 Expansion Loses Support of Albina Vision, City

Gov. Brown says project must have support of local Black community 

Justice Department to Investigate Portland Protest Shooting

Donavan LaBella was standing with both arms in the air holding a large speaker across the street from the courthouse when a federal officer fired a less-lethal round at his head

Seattle Mayor, City Council at Odds Over 50% Police Cut

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan says the City Council has failed to speak with the police chief or conduct sufficient research

OSU, UO Among 20 Universities Filing Federal Lawsuit in Oregon Over International Student Order

The lawsuit, filed today, seeks to protect the educational status of nearly 3,500 students attending OSU

NEWS BRIEFS

Schultz Family Foundation Appoints Tyra Mariani as New President

The Schultz Family Foundation is founded by former Starbucks CEO and chairman emeritus Howard Schultz and his wife Sheri Schultz ...

Meyer Memorial Trust Announces $25 Million For Justice Oregon For Black Lives

Meyer awards initial grants totaling nearly jumi.3 million. ...

Secretary of State Bev Clarno Announces Extension of Signature Gathering for Initiative Petition 57

IP 57 is seeking to amend the Oregon Constitution to create an independent redistricting commission. ...

NNPA Livestreams With Congresswomen Alexandria Ocasio Cortez and Val Demings

The audience has an opportunity to be an interactive part of the interview ...

Black Women Often Ignored By Social Justice Movements

‘Intersectional invisibility’ may lead to Black women’s exclusion, study finds ...

Arrests as police clear 2 Portland parks of demonstrators

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Police made multiple arrests as protesters were cleared from two downtown Portland, Oregon, parks early Thursday morning.KOIN reports that early Thursday police ordered people to leave Chapman Square and Lownsdale Square parks. Demonstrators had been occupying the park...

Over 20 test positive for COVID-19 at memory care home

BEND, Ore. (AP) — More than 20 people have tested positive for COVID-19 at the Mt. Bachelor Memory Care center in Bend, health officials said. After four days of testing staff and residents, contact tracers are working to determine the origin of the infection, according to Deschutes County...

Missouri's Drinkwitz takes side in mask-or-no-mask debate

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Eli Drinkwitz has been the head coach at Missouri for just over seven months. He has yet to lead the Tigers onto the football field, much less win a game, yet his role in the community already has forced him to take some important stands.First, it was supporting his new...

Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner hurt in jet ski accident

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner sustained serious injuries when he and a passenger on a jet ski collided with a boat on the Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri.According to a police report, Koerner and Cole Coffin were hurt at about 6:30 p.m. Friday when their watercraft...

OPINION

Heeding the Cries for Justice: Justice Oregon for Black Lives

Meyer trustees call on philanthropy peers and partners in business and industry to support this movement ...

COMMENTARY: Real Table Talk

Chaplain Debbie Walker provides helpful insight for self-preservation, and care tips for your family, your neighbors, and your community circles ...

Commissioner Hardesty Responds To Federal Troop Actions Towards Protesters

This protester is still fighting for their life and I want to be clear: this should never have happened. ...

Recent Protests Show Need For More Government Collective Bargaining Transparency

Since taxpayers are ultimately responsible for funding government union contract agreements, they should be allowed to monitor the negotiation process ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

2 Germans arrested over far-right, anti-Semitic website

BERLIN (AP) — Two German men were arrested Thursday on suspicion of spearheading a far-right group that posted pro-Nazi and anti-Semitic material online, prosecutors said.A suspect accused of co-founding the “Goyim Party Germany” group in 2016 and identified only as Fadi J. in...

Diversity of LGBTQ characters in film declines, study finds

NEW YORK (AP) — Last year saw record representation of LGBTQ characters in the 118 films released by major studios, according to a new study by GLAAD. But for the third straight year, the racial diversity of LGBTQ characters has waned and transgender characters again went unseen.GLAAD called...

North Macedonia: Social Democrats score narrow election win

SKOPJE, North Macedonia (AP) — North Macedonia's pro-Western Social Democrats said they were ready Thursday to start complicated power-sharing negotiations after winning a narrow election victory in a poll held up for months by the COVID-19 pandemic.Former Prime Minister Zoran Zaev's Social...

ENTERTAINMENT

Gooding’s misconduct case back on docket after virus delays

NEW YORK (AP) — When Cuba Gooding Jr. returns to court next month for a hearing in his New York City sexual misconduct case, he’ll find the room outfitted with Plexiglas and other measures to prevent the spread of the coronavirus that has indefinitely delayed his trial, a judge said...

Michelle Obama to host podcast on health, relationships

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Michelle Obama will let her own voice be heard on a new podcast.The former first lady will host “The Michelle Obama Podcast” on the streaming service, the Obama’s Higher Ground and Spotify announced Thursday. The podcast will exclusively debut on...

Liked 'Hamilton'? New documentary shows where it came from

NEW YORK (AP) — You've probably seen or heard the highly scripted side of Lin-Manuel Miranda. Now get to know the unscripted one.The playwright, actor and songwriter this month follows up the streaming live capture of his triumphant Broadway musical “Hamilton” with a...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Spacecraft snaps closest pictures of sun, 'campfires' abound

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — A European and NASA spacecraft has snapped the closest pictures ever taken of...

VIRUS DIARY: Perfect pregnancy plans, ruined by a pandemic

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Vatican says bishops should report sex abuse to police

VATICAN CITY (AP) — The Vatican told bishops around the world on Thursday they should report cases of...

The Latest: Florida reports nearly 14,000 new virus cases

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Florida announced a single-day record of 156 deaths from the coronavirus. The state...

3 more states share license data for citizenship efforts

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — Iowa, South Carolina and South Dakota have now joined Nebraska in agreeing to...

EU praises Serbia, Kosovo for resuming face-to-face talks

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union praised the leaders of Serbia and Kosovo for resuming face-to-face talks...

McMenamins
Errin Haines and Suzanne Gamboa the Associated Press


Maxine Waters, D-Calif., has been
vocal about reducing Black unemployment.

ATLANTA (AP) -- President Barack Obama's jobs pitch is already playing well with Blacks, who had grown plenty irked with him over what they perceived as his indifference to their needs.

A day after Obama laid out before Congress his plan to kick-start job growth, many blacks hoped it would translate into reduced misery for them over the coming months. While the country's unemployment rate stands at 9.1 percent, Black unemployment has hit 16.7 percent, the highest since 1984. Unemployment among male Blacks is at 18 percent, and black teens are unemployed at a rate of 46.5 percent.

The early signs of their reaction were positive.

Social media sites were abuzz with highlights from the president's plan. Amid the comments were excited responses to the proposal, especially from the Black community. Twitter was full of similar bursts of excitement over the plan, with some Black Tweeters defending the president and applauding his message. One user tweeted: "Taking a sharp tone `cause the NumbersDontLie! Pass this bill and put America back to work."

Prominent African Americans like Kenneth Chenault, chairman and CEO of American Express and Michael Nutter, mayor of Philadelphia, quickly applauded the plan. Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., has been one of the most vocal advocates for dealing more effectively with Black unemployment, but she was enthusiastic.

For the president, it was a welcome change in tone after a steady drumbeat of criticism from members of the Congressional Black Caucus, who held their own job fairs and town hall meetings while protesting that Obama's jobs tour across America last month bypassed Black communities.

The caucus' urban blitz cleared a path for the country's first Black president to act, Waters said.

"I can see that our handprint is all over it," Waters said of Obama's plan. "We upped the ante a little bit by pushing, being a bit more vocal. This was not done in a way to threaten the president but to make it easier for him. We think we helped him to be able to formulate a response."

The jobs plan was praised by Ralph Everett, president and chief executive of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, a nonpartisan Black think tank.

Although the president did not specifically mention high unemployment among Blacks, Black people "are sophisticated enough to understand" how their communities will benefit, U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk said Friday.

"Obviously there is a debate raging, saying that we should come out and say this expressly for the black and Latino community," Kirk said. "But this president got elected spectacularly on his premise that we are not a black America, a brown America, a white America. We are one America."

The White House moved quickly to capitalize politically on the good will, emailing an extraordinary blast of supportive statements from elected officials, union leaders and interest groups within minutes after Obama spoke Thursday night.

On Friday, while the president pushed his American Jobs Act in Richmond, Va., his aides promoted targeted relief to Hispanics, teachers, police officers, construction workers, small businesses and others.

Administration officials said the plan would extend unemployment benefits and provide support for 1.4 million Blacks who have been unemployed six months or longer. It also would provide summer and subsidized jobs for youth, help boost the paychecks of 20 million Black workers through an extension and expansion of the payroll tax, and benefit, in some way, more than 100,000 Black-owned small businesses.

"With over 16 percent of African Americans out of work and over 1 million African Americans out of work over six months, I think the president believes this is a serious problem and the onus is on us to do everything we can to tackle this," Danielle Gray, deputy director of the National Economic Council, told reporters.

White House adviser Valerie Jarrett promoted Obama's plan on Steve Harvey's syndicated morning radio show, saying it would help "every part of our country, but particularly those who are the most vulnerable, who have been struggling the hardest, who have been trying to make ends meet and all they need is a little help from their government."

A factor in the early enthusiasm in Obama's plan with blacks is that most accept that, as the country's first black president, there are limits to what he can do about their specific problems - especially as he heads into the 2012 campaign.

"Do I think he's doing everything he can? Yes, of course," said Tonia Thomas, 44, a divorced Atlanta mother who was unemployed for more than a year before taking a $30,000 pay cut to work as a hotel clerk. "A lot of what's going on is being used to exclude people of color in general. I don't know what he can do."

The president has to be careful in targeting his efforts, some say.

"The more he talks about race, the more votes he loses," said Randall Kennedy, author of a new book exploring racial politics and the Obama presidency. "Barack Obama had to overcome his Blackness to become president ... and he's going to have to overcome it to be re-elected."

Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed, an Obama supporter who engaged in damage control for the president this week, said Black Americans "need to burst this false notion" that the president should put Black unemployment on par with overall unemployment.

"If leaders in our community want to push him to lay out a Black agenda, I believe that will end up disserving the Black community and help elect people who certainly don't have a past history about caring about the interests of the African American community," Reed said after Obama's speech. "This debate is weakening the president and puts him in a political position where he has to do something to confirm his Blackness."

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Follow Errin Haines at http://www.twitter.com/emarvelous

Associated Press writer Suzanne Gamboa reported from Washington.

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