07-02-2020  11:00 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Police Union Contract Extended, Bargaining to Continue

Negotiations will resume in January 2021.

Inslee Heckled Off Stage During Tri-Cities Appearance

Speaking outdoors in Eastern Washington, the governor was repeatedly interrupted by hecklers as he urged residents to wear masks to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

Portland Police Declare Riot, Use Tear Gas

Several arrests were made as protests continued into early Wednesday morning.

Oregon Legislature Passes Police Reform Package Amid ‘Rushed’ Criticism

Six new bills declare an emergency in police protocol and are immediately effective. 

NEWS BRIEFS

Trump Blows His Twitter Dog Whistle on America’s Fair Housing Policies in the Suburbs

The president could be Tweeting on unemployment or COVID-19 infections but instead pushes housing discrimination ...

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Awards Historic $100,000 Founders' Centennial Scholarship

Zeta celebrates 100 years with largest single recipient scholarship awarded by a historically Black Greek-lettered sorority or...

Nominations Being Accepted for the Gladys McCoy Lifetime Achievement Award

Gladys McCoy Lifetime Achievement Award was established in 1994 to honor Multnomah County residents who have contributed outstanding...

Shatter, LLC Launches to Elevate Diverse Voices in Progressive Politics

A collaboration of leading female political strategists aims to fill a void in the world of political consulting ...

New Director Takes Helm at Oregon Black Pioneers

In its 27-year history, the organization has never had an executive director, and has expressed confidence and optimism in Zachary A....

Police union contract extended, bargaining to continue

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The Portland City Council voted unanimously Wednesday to extend bargaining over the next Portland Police Association contract for a year to increase public involvement in the negotiations.Negotiations over the next contract with the union that represents rank-and-file...

Oregon House speaker slams Portland police use of tear gas

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — More than two dozen protesters were arrested on charges including disorderly conduct, interfering with a police officer, riot and assault on a police officer during protests that stretched into the early morning hours of Wednesday, Portland police said.Authorities said...

Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner hurt in jet ski accident

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner sustained serious injuries when he and a passenger on a jet ski collided with a boat on the Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri.According to a police report, Koerner and Cole Coffin were hurt at about 6:30 p.m. Friday when their watercraft...

Missouri football program pushes again for racial justice

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Ryan Walters had just arrived at the University of Missouri to coach safeties for the football program when a series of protests related to racial injustice led to the resignations of the system president and the chancellor of its flagship campus.The student-led movement...

OPINION

Editorial From the Publisher: Vote as Your Life Depends on It

The Republican-controlled Senate won’t pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, no matter how hard Oregon’s senators and others work to push for change. ...

Banana Republic or Constitutional Democracy? The US Military May Decide

Will the military, when and if the chips are down, acts in accord with the Constitution and not out of loyalty to its commander-in-chief? ...

To Save Black Lives, and the Soul of Our Nation, Congress Must Act Boldly

For too long, Black people in America have been burdened with the unjust responsibility of keeping ourselves safe from police. ...

Racial Inequalities - Black America Has Solutions; White America Won't Approve Them

The problem is we have to secure approval of the solutions from the people who deny the problem's existence while reaping the benefits from it. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Cleared in shooting, Iowa officer fired for letting woman go

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — As protests over the death of George Floyd grew in Iowa’s second largest city, activists demanded the firing of a white officer who shot and paralyzed an unarmed Black man during a 2016 traffic stop.On June 18, Cedar Rapids Police Chief Wayne Jerman seemed to...

3 cities pilot South Africa-style truth, reconciliation push

BOSTON (AP) — District attorneys in Boston, Philadelphia and San Francisco are teaming up on a pilot effort patterned after South Africa's post-apartheid truth and reconciliation commission to confront racism in the criminal justice system.Suffolk County DA Rachael Rollins, Philadelphia DA...

Robert E. Lee statue becomes epicenter of protest movement

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Just a little over a month ago, the area around Richmond's iconic statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee was as quiet and sedate as the statue itself. But since the May 25 police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, the area has been transformed into a bustling hub...

ENTERTAINMENT

Hot news cycle leads CNN to best ratings in 40 years

NEW YORK (AP) — An extraordinary stretch of news with the coronavirus pandemic and racial reckoning triggered by George Floyd's death has led CNN to its biggest audience for any three-month period in the network's 40-year history.Fox News Channel and MSNBC also had record-setting quarters...

Actor says 'Justice League' director Whedon was 'abusive'

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Actor Ray Fisher says director Joss Whedon's behavior was “abusive” on the set of the 2017 film “Justice League.”“Joss Wheadon’s on-set treatment of the cast and crew of Justice League was gross, abusive, unprofessional, and...

Review: Joe Ely serves up songs of honesty, hope and healing

Joe Ely, "Love In the Midst of Mayhem” (Rack 'Em Records)Joe Ely's leftovers are keepers, as “Love In the Midst of Mayhem” shows. Idled by the coronavirus — the “pandamnit,” as Ely calls it — the West Texas troubadour began digging through his...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Does wearing a mask pose any health risks?

Does wearing a mask pose any health risks?No, not for most people. Babies and toddlers should not wear masks...

Intel chiefs brief congressional leaders on Russia bounties

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. intelligence chiefs conducted classified briefings Thursday for congressional...

Wide shift in opinion on police, race rare in US polling

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's rare for public opinion on social issues to change sharply and swiftly. And yet in...

Russia denies supplying weapons to Afghanistan's Taliban

MOSCOW (AP) — Russia's Foreign Ministry said Thursday that Moscow has never delivered weapons to the...

Landslide at Myanmar jade mine kills at least 162 people

HPAKANT, Myanmar (AP) — At least 162 people were killed Thursday in a landslide at a jade mine in northern...

More than 80 reported killed this week in Ethiopia's unrest

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia (AP) — More than 80 people have been killed in unrest in Ethiopia after a popular...

McMenamins
Christine Armario the Associated Press

MIAMI (AP) -- Taking the microphone at a church in a predominantly black neighborhood of Miami, the Rev. Jesse Jackson asked how many in the crowd knew someone looking for a job.

Most of the several hundred people in the televised town hall gathering stood up. How many knew someone facing foreclosure? Student loan debt? In jail? Considered suicide? Crowds of people stood up in answer to each of his questions.

"This is a state of emergency," the civil rights leader and one-time Democratic presidential candidate declared.

The Congressional Black Caucus organized a town hall gathering in Miami to address black unemployment rates Monday evening, one of five taking place in August in distressed communities across the country. At issue is the stubbornly high unemployment rate in the black community, now at 16.8 percent nationwide, more than double that for whites and a figure that doesn't even include those who've stopped looking for work.

U.S Rep. Emanuel Cleaver, D-Mo. and the caucus chairman, said representatives are frustrated at being unable to advance bills in Congress aimed at encouraging job growth. Caucus members have introduced more than 40 such bills since January and none of them have passed. Republicans took control of the House nearly nine months ago.

Now, the lawmakers are taking to the road to ensure angry constituents that they are doing all in their power to help, while offering a job fair in each city as assistance. In Atlanta, Cleveland and Detroit, the events have drawn thousands, and more than 1,000 people streamed into a downtown convention center Tuesday morning for the Miami job fair. Another will be held in Los Angeles at the end of the month.

"We left the complaint counter and that's why we're on this tour," Cleaver said.

The mounting frustration over jobs is beginning to have political repercussions in the black community.

"Unemployment in South Florida, especially in the black community, is no longer a crisis," U.S. Rep. Frederica Wilson, D-Fla., said before the event. "It's an epidemic."

The job fairs come amid a growing debate within the black community about the Obama administration's urban agenda. While black lawmakers have been reluctant to criticize the country's first black president, some are beginning to voice concern about the administration's focus on deficit reduction at a time of high joblessness and poverty in urban areas.

"I think our politicians need to step up and do a better job of helping people," said Lavern Eli, the executive director of Curley's House of Style in Miami's Model City neighborhood. "It's really like they're playing games with people's lives because people are hurting. The community is hurting. People are so desperate, just trying to survive."

Cleaver said he shares the community's frustration.

"I'm frustrated with the president, but I'm frustrated with me," Cleaver said in an interview Monday. "I'm frustrated with the tea party. Maybe I should have used my communications skills better to try to convince some of them to work with us. I'm frustrated with the Democratic leadership. The Republican leadership. The president. I think all of us bear some responsibility, some more than others, however."

At the town hall on Monday, congressional leaders, a White House representative, Jackson and a church leader fielded questions from an MSNBC moderator about what they've done to create jobs, reduce unemployment, push for another stimulus, and address the influence of tea party Republican legislators.

Don Graves, executive director of the president's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness, told representatives and constituents that President Barack Obama is focused on every community in the nation, but acknowledged some have bit hit harder than others.

U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., told him to be more specific: the black community.

"We've got to target where the greatest need is," she said.

Wilson said the job fair on Tuesday is expected to offer up to 3,000 jobs, from custodians to janitors, and draw upward of 5,000 people. She said unemployment in her district is about 17 percent, and as high as 40 percent for black males.

"I think the president is doing as much as he can, and I'm anxious to hear his proposal when we go back in September," Wilson said, referring to the president's job creation plan. "But if it includes any funding, we're going to have to fight. Because the tea party will stop him."

As the economy has struggled to recover, minorities have been disproportionately affected. An analysis of Census data released in July found that wealth gaps between whites and minorities have grown to their widest levels in a quarter-century, with whites on average having 20 times the net worth of blacks and 18 times that of Hispanics.

Algernon Austin, director of the race, ethnicity and economy program at the Economic Policy Institute, said a number of factors are pushing up the black unemployment rate, including a somewhat younger labor force, less-educated workers and discrimination. He pointed to several studies in which black and white workers presented the same qualifications to prospective employers. The black candidate consistently received less favorable responses.

"Even in good economic times, African American communities experience very high levels of unemployment," Austin said.

Tracey Turner, 40, of North Miami, came to Monday's event hoping to get some information on jobs. She has been out of work for nearly two years, after being laid off from her job as an accountant for Wal-Mart in September 2010.

Turner's unemployment benefits have expired and she is supporting four children. She has been working temp jobs but hasn't had any the last four months.

"It's killing me," she said.

Jaron Taylor, an 18-year-old Miami resident, said Tuesday he is desperately looking for work to help pay for college. Among the booths he visited was one set up by Starbucks.

"I have a good feeling," Taylor said. "The energy in this room is something. There's a good vibe. People are addressing the issue. They are making sure something will be done."

---

Reporter Harry R. Weber in Miami contributed to this report.

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