08-23-2019  1:48 am   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

New Hate Crime Law Kicks In

SB577 requires state to better track bias crimes

Mayor: Show Extra Love at Portland Businesses After Protests

The City of Portland and more are offering deals and free parking downtown this weekend in an effort to generate some of the revenue lost during last weekend's political protests

Community Leaders Heartened By Portland Response To Proud Boys Rally

Proud Boys outnumbered by counter-demonstrators in largely peaceful event

Black Man Told He Couldn't Enter Portland Bar Because of Jewelry Sues

An African American man has filed a 0,000 lawsuit against a Portland bar owner, claiming he was prevented from going inside in 2018 because he was wearing "too many" chain necklaces

NEWS BRIEFS

Travel Portland Opens New Director Park Visitor Center

Hosts “Celebrating All Things Portland” grand opening weekend celebration ...

Police are Trying to Connect Floyd Leslie Hill to His Loved Ones

The Portland Police Bureau is asking for the community's help in locating the loved ones of Floyd Leslie Hill who passed away on...

Study Finds Lack of Racial Diversity in Cancer Drug Clinical Trials

New research published this week in JAMA Oncology has found a lack of racial and ethnic diversity in clinical trials for cancer drugs ...

Portland Parks, Partners Host Charles Jordan Birthday Celebration

A celebration of the life of one of Portland’s most influential leaders, held at his namesake community center ...

Matt Dishman Community Center Annual Block Party

The event will feature free food, arts and crafts, family fun, live music and more ...

Court ends lawsuit over Washington school's isolation booth

LONGVIEW, Wash. (AP) — A federal court ruling has effectively ended a lawsuit against a Washington state school district over use of an isolation booth at an elementary school.The Daily News reported Thursday that the U.S. Court of Appeals decision upheld a lower court ruling in favor of the...

Oregon DA removes lobby photo display of past office holders

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — An Oregon district attorney's office has removed a display of photographs of people who previously held the position.KOIN-TV reported Monday that Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill had the photos placed in storage in an attempt to create a "welcoming and...

Ex-Clemson star Kelly Bryant takes over at QB for Missouri

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Barry Odom never seems stressed about the future, whether the Missouri coach is pondering tough sanctions handed down by the NCAA over a recruiting scandal or the fact that one of the most prolific passers in school history is now in the NFL.When it comes to the...

Missouri DE Williams pleads to misdemeanor, put on probation

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Missouri defensive end Tre Williams pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor and was sentenced to two years of unsupervised probation after prosecutors dropped a felony domestic assault charge.The Columbia Daily Tribune reports Williams pleaded guilty to peace disturbance and was...

OPINION

Why I’m Visiting the Border

People of color are feeling less safe today and any day when we see the realities of domestic terrorism and racially-motivated acts of violence ...

Why Lady Liberty Weeps

The original concept was to have Lady Liberty holding a broken shackle and chain in her left hand, to commemorate the end of slavery in the United States. ...

Avel Gordly's Statement in Advance of Aug. 17 Rally

'All we have on this planet is one another' ...

A National Crisis: Surging Hate Crimes and White Supremacists

Our history chronicles the range of hate crimes that have taken the lives of Latinos as well as Native Americans, Blacks, Jews, and the LGBTQ community ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Descendants of America's first Africans will mark 400 years

HAMPTON, Va. (AP) — A family that traces its bloodline to America's first enslaved Africans will gather at its cemetery to reflect on their arrival 400 years ago.The family is holding a reflection Friday at the Tucker Family Cemetery in Hampton, Virginia. The reflection is one of several...

Dolphins' Flores says he supports player protest movement

MIAMI GARDENS, Fla. (AP) — Miami Dolphins coach Brian Flores says he supports the NFL player protest movement and receiver Kenny Stills' involvement, but wants him to play better."Everything these guys protest, I've lived it, I've experienced it," said an impassioned Flores, who is the son...

Judge close to naming special prosecutor in Smollett case

CHICAGO (AP) — An Illinois judge seems close to appointing a special prosecutor to look into why state prosecutors abruptly dropped charges against actor Jussie Smollett accusing him of staging a racist, anti-gay attack against himself.A hearing Friday will be one of the first opportunities...

ENTERTAINMENT

Once upon a time in fatherhood: Tarantino to become a dad

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Quentin Tarantino is going to be telling a whole new brand of "Once upon a time" tale — the bedtime-story kind.The "Once Upon a Time... In Hollywood" director is about to become a father.His representative Katherine Rowe says Tarantino and his wife, Israeli model...

Manslaughter case continues against Mexican actor Pablo Lyle

MIAMI (AP) — A manslaughter case against Mexican actor Pablo Lyle will move forward after a Florida judge refused to dismiss it under the state's "stand your ground" self-defense law.The Miami Herald reports that Miami-Dade Circuit Judge Alan Fine made his ruling Thursday, meaning the case...

Man dubbed 'Boy Next Door Killer' found sane by jury

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Jurors on Thursday found a man prosecutors have dubbed "The Boy Next Door Killer" was sane when he fatally stabbed two women and tried to kill a third inside their Southern California homes.The decision was announced after less than a day of deliberations in the sanity...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Japan leader says S. Korea ending intel deal damages trust

TOKYO (AP) — Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said South Korea's decision to cancel a deal to share...

Serial killer who preyed on gay men executed in Florida

STARKE, Fla. (AP) — Gary Ray Bowles, a serial killer who preyed on older gay men during an eight-month...

Canada halts Hong Kong consulate staff travel after UK case

HONG KONG (AP) — Accountants in Hong Kong marched Friday in support of the pro-democracy movement, while...

As global economic picture dims, solutions seem out of reach

WASHINGTON (AP) — As global leaders gather on two continents to take account of a darkening economic...

Climate change turns Arctic into strategic, economic hotspot

TASIILAQ, Greenland (AP) — From a helicopter, Greenland's brilliant white ice and dark mountains make the...

New Zealand parliament speaker soothes baby as debate rages

WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — The man who presides over New Zealand's parliament has been called a baby...

McMenamins
Matthew Barakat Associated Press

McLEAN, Va. (AP) -- The calls have reached a point of repetitive regularity for civil rights lawyer Gadeir Abbas: A young Muslim American, somewhere in the world, is barred from boarding an airplane.

The exact reasons are never fully articulated, but the reality is clear. The traveler has been placed on the government's terror watchlist - or the more serious no-fly list - and clearing one's name becomes a legal and bureaucratic nightmare.

On Monday Abbas sent letters to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and FBI Director Robert Mueller requesting assistance for his two most recent clients. One is a resident of Portland, Ore. who is trying to fly to Italy to live with his mother. The other, a teenager and U.S. citizen living in Jordan, has been unable to travel to Connecticut to lead prayers at a mosque.

"All American citizens have the unqualified right to reside in the United States," Abbas wrote Monday in a letter to secretary of State Hillary Clinton seeking a change in status for the client in Jordan.

Abbas, a lawyer with the Council on American-Islamic Relations, tries to piece together the reason why a client has been placed on the list. Perhaps a person has a similar name to a known terrorist. Maybe their travels to Yemen or some other Middle East hot spot have garnered suspicion. Maybe they told the FBI to take a hike when they requested an interview.

Ultimately, though, the reasons are almost irrelevant. From Abbas' perspective, the placement on the no-fly list amounts to a denial of a traveler's basic rights: U.S. citizens can't return home from overseas vacations, children are separated from parents, and those under suspicion are denied the basic due process rights that would allow them to clear their name.

Abbas describes the security bureaucracy as Kafkaesque, a labyrinthine maze of overlapping agencies, all of which refuse to provide answers unless they are threatened with legal action. One lawsuit is still pending in federal court in Alexandria, Va. That case has followed what has become a familiar pattern: Abbas either files a lawsuit or exposes the case to public scrutiny through the media, and within a few days the individual in question is able to travel. Government officials then ask a judge to dismiss any lawsuits that were filed, saying the cases are now moot.

"The amount of people who experience tragic, life-altering travel delays is significant," said Abbas, who estimates he gets a call at least once a month from a Muslim American in dire straits because their travel has been restricted.

Government officials, of course, see it differently. They say they have a Traveler Redress Inquiry Program that lets people wrongly placed on the no-fly list, or the much broader terrorist watchlist, fix their circumstances.

More broadly, the government has argued in court that placing somebody on the no-fly list does not deprive them of any constitutional rights. Just because a person can't fly doesn't mean they can't travel, the government lawyers argue. They can always take a boat, for example.

"Neither Plaintiff nor any other American citizen has either a right to international travel or a right to travel by airplane," government lawyers wrote in their defense against a lawsuit by another of Abbas' clients. The teenager from Virginia had found himself stuck in Kuwait after suspicions about has travel to Somalia apparently landed him on the no-fly list.

Exactly how many people are on the government's lists is unclear. Some of the most recent estimates, from late 2009, state that about 400,000 individuals are on the "watchlist," which requires a "reasonable suspicion" that the person is known or suspected to be engaged in terrorist activities. A much smaller number - about 14,000 - is on the "selectee list," meaning they will likely have to undergo rigorous screening to travel. And officials estimated that 3,400 individuals, including roughly 170 U.S. residents, are on the no-fly list.

Calls and emails to the Department of Homeland Security and State Department's Bureau of Consular Affairs were not returned.

Michael Migliore was told by security officials last month that he is on the no-fly list after he tried to take a flight from Portland, Ore., to Italy following his college graduation. Migliore, a Muslim and a dual citizen of the U.S. and Italy, was planning a permanent move to Italy to live with his mother.

Migliore, 23, suspects he was placed on the no-fly list after he refused to talk to the FBI without a lawyer in November 2010, when the bureau was investigating an acquaintance charged in a plot to detonate bomb at a Christmas tree lighting ceremony.

"I feel that I did the right thing," Migliore said of his decision to exercise his rights when questioned by the FBI. "I didn't do anything wrong. ... It's very frustrating, not knowing what's going to happen, if I'm ever going to get off this list."

For now, he's waiting in Portland until he can get his name cleared for travel.

In another case, an 18 year-old U.S. citizen living in Jordan with his parents was bounced from an EgyptAir flight to New York. Amr Abulrub had planned to lead Ramadan prayers at a Connecticut mosque.

After a few days of confusion, Abulrub learned from airline officials that the U.S. government had instructed EgyptAir to cancel his ticket. U.S. embassy officials in Amman have subsequently told Abulrub he can travel under certain restrictions, including a requirement that his flight to the U.S. be booked on an American airline. But Abulrub is leery of traveling at all for fear that he won't be allowed to go back to Jordan.

Abulrub's father, Jalal Abulrub, suspects his son has come to the attention of U.S. authorities because of his own writings. Jalal is a Salafist scholar who has sometimes written provocative articles and antagonized Christian evangelists he believed were disrespectful to Muslims. While Jalal says his family is Salafist - generally considered a fundamentalist sect of Islam - he is quick to point out that he has a long history of writing in opposition to the ideology espoused by Osama bin laden and al-Qaida.

"I am not going to let this go," Jalal said, referring to his son's inability to travel. "We don't allow anyone to oppress us."

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