06-17-2019  11:42 am   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Progressive Climate Policy Poised to Pass in Oregon

Oregon is on the precipice of becoming the second state after California to adopt a cap-and-trade program, a market-based approach to lowering the greenhouse gas emissions behind global warming.

Photos: Oregon Welcomes Shakespeare Festival’s Newly Appointed Artistic Director

On Wednesday, June 12, the Oregon Shakespeare Festival hosted a reception at the Froelick Gallery to welcome newly appointed artistic director Nataki Garret.

Juneteenth Celebrations Expand Across Metro Area, State

Gresham, Vancouver events join decades-old Portland celebration of the effective end of slavery

Portland Black Pride in June

Midway through Pride Month, there are still a number of events throughout Portland that celebrate LGBTQ community members of color.

NEWS BRIEFS

Must-See Shows Open in OSF Outdoor Theatre

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Roosevelt High School Students Earn National Recognition for Resiliency

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Seattle Art Museum Appoints Amada Cruz as New Director and CEO

The Board of Trustees of the Seattle Art Museum (SAM) announced today that Amada Cruz has been chosen as the museum’s new Illsley...

The Oregon Historical Society Presents a Lecture on Oregon’s Enigmatic Black History

Join the Oregon Historical Society for an evening exploring Oregon’s enigmatic history in relation to Blacks ...

Lisa Loving ‘Street Journalist’ Reading

On June, 2, Lisa Loving, former news editor of The Skanner News, read from her new book at Powell’s Books on Burnside ...

All 7 of Oregon's public universities will raise tuition

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — All seven of Oregon's public universities will raise tuition for the 2019-2020 school year, with officials citing increased costs and less money than expected from legislators.The hikes range from 2.33% at Western Oregon University in Monmouth to 9.9% at Ashland's Southern...

Shooter fires at car after dispute at Oregon gas station

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Authorities say a car was struck by gunfire following a parking dispute at an Oregon gas station.The Oregonian/OregonLive reports a BMW sedan had stopped at gas station in Rock Creek northwest of Portland early Sunday.Washington County Sheriff's Detective Robert...

OPINION

U.S. Attempt to Erase Harriet Tubman

Traitors like Jefferson Davis and other Confederates are memorialized while a woman who risked her life time and again to free enslaved people is simply dismissed. ...

Watching a Father and Son

You must have seen this video of a father speaking with his pre-verbal son about the season finale of Empire. ...

The Congressional Black Caucus Must Oppose HR 246

If every tactic that was used by African Americans in the Civil Rights Movement and/or in the fight against apartheid South Africa was either criminalized or attacked by the US Congress, how would you respond? ...

Jamestown to Jamestown: Commemorating 400 Years of the African Diaspora Experience

We are now able to actualize the healing and collective unity so many generations have worked to achieve in ways which bring power to our communities in America, Africa and throughout our Diaspora. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Buttigieg returns to South Bend after man killed by police

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — A police officer fatally shot a black man in South Bend, Indiana, leading Mayor Pete Buttigieg to return home early from a presidential campaign trip to address the public and reach out to community members.The shooting happened early Sunday after someone called police to...

Search warrant cites synagogue shooter's hatred of Judaism

SAN DIEGO (AP) — The sole gunman in a Southern California synagogue shooting in which a woman was killed told an investigator he adopted his hatred of Judaism 18 months before the fatal attack, according to a federal search warrant.John T. Earnest, 19, also told a San Diego Sheriff's...

Sentencing moved up for man in deadly Charlottesville rally

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) — A sentencing hearing has been moved up for an avowed white supremacist convicted of federal hate crimes for plowing his car into a crowd of anti-racism protesters at a 2017 white nationalist rally in Virginia.James Alex Fields Jr. was originally scheduled to be...

ENTERTAINMENT

APNewsBreak: 'Hunger Games' prequel novel coming in 2020

NEW YORK (AP) — A decade after seemingly wrapping up "The Hunger Games," Suzanne Collins is bringing readers back to Panem. A prequel, set 64 years before the beginning of her multimillion-selling trilogy, is coming next year.The novel, currently untitled, is scheduled for release on May 19,...

Shania Twain set to party again in Vegas with new residency

NEW YORK (AP) — Since Shania Twain launched her first residency in Las Vegas seven years ago, Sin City has been invaded with contemporary pop stars, from Lady Gaga to Drake to Christina Aguilera, jumping on the residency trend. Even Cardi B has plans for a short-term Vegas residency this...

Taylor Swift's new video features Ellen, RuPaul and more

NEW YORK (AP) — Taylor Swift's new music video features a number of famous faces, including Ellen DeGeneres, Laverne Cox, RuPaul and the cast of "Queer Eye."The clip for her song "You Need to Calm Down," in which Swift calls out homophobes and her own haters, was released Monday.Ryan...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Why US-China trade war risks hurting firms in both countries

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State media say Chinese President Xi to visit North Korea

BEIJING (AP) — Chinese President Xi Jinping will make a state visit to North Korea this week, state media...

Beyond rivers, Midwestern floodwaters hurt seafood catches

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — This is a bad year for people who make their living from seafood in Louisiana and...

Sources: US to question Assange pal jailed in Ecuador

BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — U.S. investigators have received permission from Ecuador to question a Swedish...

Pakistani police target traffickers selling brides to China

FAISALABAD, Pakistan (AP) — At first, in her desperate calls home to her mother in Pakistan, Natasha Masih...

The Latest: Airbus is ready for autonomous planes; are you?

LE BOURGET, France (AP) — The Latest on the Paris Air Show (all times local):7 p.m.The chief salesman for...

McMenamins
Matthew Barakat Associated Press

McLEAN, Va. (AP) -- The calls have reached a point of repetitive regularity for civil rights lawyer Gadeir Abbas: A young Muslim American, somewhere in the world, is barred from boarding an airplane.

The exact reasons are never fully articulated, but the reality is clear. The traveler has been placed on the government's terror watchlist - or the more serious no-fly list - and clearing one's name becomes a legal and bureaucratic nightmare.

On Monday Abbas sent letters to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and FBI Director Robert Mueller requesting assistance for his two most recent clients. One is a resident of Portland, Ore. who is trying to fly to Italy to live with his mother. The other, a teenager and U.S. citizen living in Jordan, has been unable to travel to Connecticut to lead prayers at a mosque.

"All American citizens have the unqualified right to reside in the United States," Abbas wrote Monday in a letter to secretary of State Hillary Clinton seeking a change in status for the client in Jordan.

Abbas, a lawyer with the Council on American-Islamic Relations, tries to piece together the reason why a client has been placed on the list. Perhaps a person has a similar name to a known terrorist. Maybe their travels to Yemen or some other Middle East hot spot have garnered suspicion. Maybe they told the FBI to take a hike when they requested an interview.

Ultimately, though, the reasons are almost irrelevant. From Abbas' perspective, the placement on the no-fly list amounts to a denial of a traveler's basic rights: U.S. citizens can't return home from overseas vacations, children are separated from parents, and those under suspicion are denied the basic due process rights that would allow them to clear their name.

Abbas describes the security bureaucracy as Kafkaesque, a labyrinthine maze of overlapping agencies, all of which refuse to provide answers unless they are threatened with legal action. One lawsuit is still pending in federal court in Alexandria, Va. That case has followed what has become a familiar pattern: Abbas either files a lawsuit or exposes the case to public scrutiny through the media, and within a few days the individual in question is able to travel. Government officials then ask a judge to dismiss any lawsuits that were filed, saying the cases are now moot.

"The amount of people who experience tragic, life-altering travel delays is significant," said Abbas, who estimates he gets a call at least once a month from a Muslim American in dire straits because their travel has been restricted.

Government officials, of course, see it differently. They say they have a Traveler Redress Inquiry Program that lets people wrongly placed on the no-fly list, or the much broader terrorist watchlist, fix their circumstances.

More broadly, the government has argued in court that placing somebody on the no-fly list does not deprive them of any constitutional rights. Just because a person can't fly doesn't mean they can't travel, the government lawyers argue. They can always take a boat, for example.

"Neither Plaintiff nor any other American citizen has either a right to international travel or a right to travel by airplane," government lawyers wrote in their defense against a lawsuit by another of Abbas' clients. The teenager from Virginia had found himself stuck in Kuwait after suspicions about has travel to Somalia apparently landed him on the no-fly list.

Exactly how many people are on the government's lists is unclear. Some of the most recent estimates, from late 2009, state that about 400,000 individuals are on the "watchlist," which requires a "reasonable suspicion" that the person is known or suspected to be engaged in terrorist activities. A much smaller number - about 14,000 - is on the "selectee list," meaning they will likely have to undergo rigorous screening to travel. And officials estimated that 3,400 individuals, including roughly 170 U.S. residents, are on the no-fly list.

Calls and emails to the Department of Homeland Security and State Department's Bureau of Consular Affairs were not returned.

Michael Migliore was told by security officials last month that he is on the no-fly list after he tried to take a flight from Portland, Ore., to Italy following his college graduation. Migliore, a Muslim and a dual citizen of the U.S. and Italy, was planning a permanent move to Italy to live with his mother.

Migliore, 23, suspects he was placed on the no-fly list after he refused to talk to the FBI without a lawyer in November 2010, when the bureau was investigating an acquaintance charged in a plot to detonate bomb at a Christmas tree lighting ceremony.

"I feel that I did the right thing," Migliore said of his decision to exercise his rights when questioned by the FBI. "I didn't do anything wrong. ... It's very frustrating, not knowing what's going to happen, if I'm ever going to get off this list."

For now, he's waiting in Portland until he can get his name cleared for travel.

In another case, an 18 year-old U.S. citizen living in Jordan with his parents was bounced from an EgyptAir flight to New York. Amr Abulrub had planned to lead Ramadan prayers at a Connecticut mosque.

After a few days of confusion, Abulrub learned from airline officials that the U.S. government had instructed EgyptAir to cancel his ticket. U.S. embassy officials in Amman have subsequently told Abulrub he can travel under certain restrictions, including a requirement that his flight to the U.S. be booked on an American airline. But Abulrub is leery of traveling at all for fear that he won't be allowed to go back to Jordan.

Abulrub's father, Jalal Abulrub, suspects his son has come to the attention of U.S. authorities because of his own writings. Jalal is a Salafist scholar who has sometimes written provocative articles and antagonized Christian evangelists he believed were disrespectful to Muslims. While Jalal says his family is Salafist - generally considered a fundamentalist sect of Islam - he is quick to point out that he has a long history of writing in opposition to the ideology espoused by Osama bin laden and al-Qaida.

"I am not going to let this go," Jalal said, referring to his son's inability to travel. "We don't allow anyone to oppress us."

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