04-23-2021  5:12 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Portland Renter Mediation in Effort to Avert Evictions

The landlord-tenant mediation program would provide somewhere between 70 and 100 mediations for Portlanders at risk of losing their housing

Housing Advocates Push to Free Public Funds for Housing from ‘Discriminatory,’ ‘Antiquated’ State System

Currently, organizations must apply for funds through one of 18 regional agencies. Even state officials decry the system.

Blumenauer Introduces Legislation to Reinstate Superfund Taxes; End 25-Year Polluter Tax Holiday That Slowed Toxic Cleanup

President Biden identified restoring payments from polluters into the Superfund Trust Fund as a top priority as part of a major infrastructure plan.

Lents Park Scene of Police Shooting During Protests

Amid protests across Portland against police brutality a man was shot and killed in Lents Park after reports he had a gun. Some protesters described by Mayor Ted Wheeler as a small group of "violent agitators" lit dumpster fires at the ICE and Multnomah County Sheriff's buildings and smashed windows downtown including at the Nike store building and the Oregon History Centre

NEWS BRIEFS

Wyden, Merkley Co-Sponsor Clean Commute for Kids Act

Legislation would invest billion in transition of school buses from diesel to zero-emission vehicles ...

Senator Patterson Passes “Domicile Unknown” Bill

Senate Bill 850 requires an unhoused person’s residence be marked “Domicile Unknown” at their time of death, allowing the state...

Oregon Reports Highest Daily COVID-19 Case Total in 3 Months

Multnomah County has the highest number of new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported Wednesday at 167 ...

Senate Confirmation of Vanita Gupta as Associate Attorney General is Historic, Vital for Our Nation

Gupta is the first woman of color ever to be confirmed to the role ...

Five Lucky Oregonians Won a Second Chance at Holiday Winnings

Prizes ranged from jumi,500 to 0,000 depending on the value of the original Scratch-it top prize. ...

Oregon: CDC investigating woman's death after J&J vaccine

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Oregon health officials said Thursday that federal officials are investigating the death of a woman in her 50s who developed a rare blood clot and low platelets within two weeks of receiving the Johnson & Johnson vaccine against COVID-19. The Oregon...

3rd teen arrested in bias crime assault at Albany park

ALBANY, Ore. (AP) — Police say a third teenager has been arrested in connection with a bias-related assault at an Albany park. Police said a 16-year-old boy was arrested on Thursday on suspicion of assault, conspiracy to commit assault, bias crime and tampering with a...

OPINION

After the Verdicts

Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum shares her thoughts after the verdicts ...

George Floyd Should Still Be Here

Wade Henderson, interim president and CEO of The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, released the following statement in response to the jury’s conviction of Derek Chauvin ...

The Verdict, The Nation, and Us

The conviction of Derek Chauvin on all three counts in the death of George Floyd represents a much-needed breeze of change ...

Portland Police Union Response to Chauvin Trial Verdict

The Portland Police Association union says in the coming days, their officers will work hard to preserve our community’s right to peacefully protest ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

'Look after my babies': In Ethiopia, a Tigray family's quest

Gunfire crackled near the home of Abraha Kinfe Gebremariam. He hoped it drowned out the cries of his wife, curled up in pain, and the newborn twin daughters wailing beside her. War had broken out in northern Ethiopia’s Tigray region at the worst possible time for Abraha and...

Police chiefs hail Chauvin verdict as a key step to healing

Not long after a jury convicted former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin of killing George Floyd, police chiefs across the U.S. started speaking up. And it wasn't to defend the police. New Orleans Police Superintendent Shaun Ferguson said convicting Chauvin on Tuesday...

Senate OKs bill to fight hate crimes against Asian Americans

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Thursday overwhelmingly passed a bill that would help combat the rise of hate crimes against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, a bipartisan denunciation of such violence during the coronavirus pandemic and a modest step toward legislating in a chamber where...

ENTERTAINMENT

Leslie Jordan parlays Instagram fame with new book and album

NEW YORK (AP) — Last year at this time, as much of the world was on lockdown due to the pandemic, Leslie Jordan began posting daily videos of himself on Instagram. The actor known for roles in the “American Horror Story” franchise and “Will & Grace” was staying...

'The Mole Agent' infiltrates a nursing home, and Hollywood

NEW YORK (AP) — “The Mole Agent” infiltrated a nursing home in Chile, and countless of hearts around the world including inside the film academy. The moving documentary about an octogenarian hired as a rookie spy to investigate whether a client’s mother is suffering...

'Rutherford Falls' mixes humor, culture clash, native voices

LOS ANGELES (AP) — In Sierra Teller Ornelas’ family, those who could spin a good tale earned a seat at her grandmom’s expansive dining table, with lesser voices banished to the living room. “There was the feeling of holding court that was really big in my family,” said...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

EXPLAINER: What does Japan's virus state of emergency mean

TOKYO (AP) — Japan on Friday declared a state of emergency to curb a rapid coronavirus resurgence, the third...

Panel: End commanders' power to block military sex cases

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Pentagon panel is recommending that decisions to prosecute service members for sexual...

Shooting revives criticism of Israel's use of deadly force

JERUSALEM (AP) — Hours after Israeli soldiers shot and killed Osama Mansour at a temporary checkpoint in the...

UK apologizes for racism in memorials to WWI dead

LONDON (AP) — British authorities apologized Thursday after an investigation found that at least 161,000 mostly...

Sanctions-battered Iran, weary of pandemic, faces worst wave

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — As Iran faces what looks like its worst wave of the coronavirus pandemic yet, Tehran...

Scientists get creative to carry on research during pandemic

SAN LORENZO, Panama (AP) — Biologist Claudio Monteza pushed through thick vegetation to install a camera near a...

Albina Highway Covers
Jill Lawless the Associated Press

LONDON (AP) -- Thousands of extra police officers were stationed on Britain's streets Friday, as the country faced its first weekend since riots raged through suburbs and town centers, leaving a scarred landscape of broken glass and torched buildings.

Police in London, which saw the worst violence, have charged almost 700 people with violence, disorder and looting, and the city's mayor said Londoners wanted to see tough sentences handed out to the guilty. Hundreds of stores were looted, buildings were set ablaze and five people died amid the mayhem that broke out Saturday in London and spread over four nights across England.

Police, meanwhile, hit back against claims they were too soft in their initial response to the disorder.

Prime Minister David Cameron said officers had been overwhelmed at first, outmaneuvered by mobile gangs of rioters. He said "far too few police were deployed onto the streets. And the tactics they were using weren't working."

That changed Tuesday, when 16,000 officers were out on London's streets - almost three times the number of the night before. Cameron said the extra officers will remain on patrol through the weekend.

Hugh Orde, president of the Association of Chief Police Officers, acknowledged that police had faced "an unprecedented situation, unique circumstances" - but said it was police themselves, rather than "political interference," that got the situation under control.

"The more robust policing tactics you saw were not a function of political interference," he told the BBC. "They were a function of the numbers being available to allow the chief constables to change their tactics."

Cameron vowed "swift justice" for perpetrators, and courts were struggling to cope with a flood of defendants.

Across the country, more than 1,700 people have been arrested. Courts in London, Birmingham and Manchester have stayed open around the clock since Wednesday to deal with hundreds of alleged offenders.

The alleged looters and vandals included an 11-year-old boy, a teenage ballerina, a university English student from a prosperous commuter town, and Natasha Reid, a 24-year-old university graduate who admitted stealing a TV from a looted electronics store. Her lawyer said she had turned herself in because she could not sleep for guilt. A judge told her she would probably go to jail when she is sentenced later.

Another was Chelsea Ives, an 18-year-old chosen as a volunteer ambassador for next year's Olympic Games. She is accused of burglary, violent disorder and throwing bricks at a police car during riots in north London on Sunday.

Newspapers reported that Ives was charged after her parents saw her rioting on TV and turned her in. She was ordered detained until a court appearance on Wednesday.

Mayor Boris Johnson said it was fitting that "significant sentences" were being handed down.

"That is, frankly, what Londoners want to see," he said.

Although the rioters came from all Britain's ethnic communities, the violence stirred fears of heightened racial tensions - especially in Birmingham, where three South Asian men were killed Tuesday when they were hit by a car, reportedly driven by black youths.

Hours later Tariq Jahan, whose 21-year-old son Haroon was killed, urged calm. So far, he has been heeded.

"This is not a race issue," he said. "The family has received messages of sympathy and support from all parts of the community - all races, all faiths and backgrounds."

Home Secretary Theresa May said she was banning a march planned for Saturday by the far-right English Defense League in the central England town of Telford amid fears of violence.

The violence was triggered by fatal police shooting of Mark Duggan, a 29-year-old father of four who was gunned down in north London's Tottenham area on Aug. 4 under disputed circumstances. A protest demanding justice on Saturday devolved into a riot, which spread to other parts of London and beyond.

Britain's police watchdog apologized Friday for "inadvertently" giving the impression immediately after the shooting that Duggan had fired at officers. The Independent Police Complaints Commission said, "We may have verbally led journalists to believe that shots were exchanged."

A gun was found in the car Duggan was traveling in, but ballistic tests showed that a bullet found lodged in an officer's radio was police issue.

Britain's Parliament was called back from its summer break for an emergency debate on the riots Thursday, with Cameron promising authorities would get strong powers to stop street mayhem from erupting again.

He said authorities were considering new powers, including allowing police to order thugs to remove masks or hoods, evicting troublemakers from subsidized housing and temporarily disabling cell phone instant messaging services.

He told lawmakers that he would look to cities like Boston for inspiration, and mentioned former Los Angeles, New York and Boston Police Chief William Bratton as a person who could help offer advice.

Bratton said he received a phone call Friday from Cameron asking him whether he would consider becoming a consultant for British police. He said he thanked Cameron for the opportunity and will continue speaking with British officials to formalize an agreement.

"This is a prime minister who has a clear idea of what he wants to do," Bratton told The Associated Press in a telephone interview. "He sees this crisis as a way to bring change. The police force there can be a catalyst for that. I'm very optimistic."

Cameron also said the government, police and intelligence services were looking at whether there should be limits on the use of social media sites like Twitter and Facebook or services like BlackBerry Messenger to spread disorder.

BlackBerry's simple and largely cost free messaging service was used by rioters to coordinate their activities, Cameron's office said. An 18-year-old woman was charged Friday with using BlackBerry messaging to encourage others to take part in violence. Several others have been charged with inciting violence on Facebook and Twitter.

The government said it planned to hold talks with police chiefs, Twitter, Facebook and Blackberry manufacturer Research In Motion Ltd.

But any move to disable the services temporarily is likely to be strongly opposed by civil libertarians.

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