09-25-2020  4:20 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
Don't Call the Police for domestic disturbances
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

A Reminder: Delta Park is Vanport

As extreme right-wing, white supremacist groups prepare to converge on Portland tomorrow, here is a reminder of the historical significance of the place they plan to overrun and the stories of the people that lived there.

Wildfires Taint West Coast Vineyards With Taste of Smoke

No one knows the extent of the smoke damage to the crop, and growers are trying to assess the severity.

Black Lives Matters Protestors, Organizers Keep Up Momentum

Hazardous air quality stopped protests for a week, interrupted the more-than-100 nights of demonstrations.

Seattle City Council Overrides Mayor's Veto of Policing Cuts

Seattle will reduce the police department’s budget and reallocate some money to community programs

NEWS BRIEFS

Blumenauer Statement on Planned White Supremacist Rally in Portland

“These are evil people looking for a fight and national media attention. Let’s not give them what they want." ...

Wish Launches $2 Million Fund To Support Black-owned Businesses

The Wish Local Empowerment Program is set to impact more than 4,000 small businesses across the US ...

Black Leaders Endorse Sarah Iannarone for Portland Mayor

Iannarone seeks to unseat an embattled Mayor Ted Wheeler, who has increasingly high unfavorable approval ratings. ...

Today in History: Senate Confirms Nomination of First Female Justice to Supreme Court

On Sept. 21, 1981, the Senate unanimously confirmed the nomination of Sandra Day O’Connor to become the first female justice on the...

Free Masks and Gloves Now Available for Small Businesses

Businesses with fewer than 50 employees that are headquartered in Oregon with principal operations in Oregon are eligible. ...

Judge removes Trump's public lands boss after governor sued

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A federal judge ruled Friday that the Trump administration's leading steward of public lands has been serving unlawfully and has blocked him from continuing in the position.U.S. District Judge Brian Morris said U.S. Bureau of Land Management acting director William...

Lawsuit: City, state failed to protect Seattle protesters

SEATTLE (AP) — A new lawsuit says the city of Seattle and Washington state failed to protect protesters from drivers who could hurt or kill them while also allowing protesters to be injured by the police response.The plaintiffs in the lawsuit filed Friday include the family of Summer Taylor,...

No. 2 Alabama visits Missouri to begin SEC-only campaign

No. 2 Alabama at Missouri, Saturday at 7 p.m. ET (ESPN).Line: Alabama by 27 1/2.Series record: Alabama leads 4-2.WHAT’S AT STAKE?The second-ranked Crimson Tide will go for their fifth straight win over Missouri when the teams open their SEC-only schedule at Faurot Field. The Tigers will be...

No. 2 Crimson Tide visit Mizzou to begin SEC-only schedule

Alabama coach Nick Saban had nothing but praise for Eli Drinkwitz when discussing his Missouri counterpart this week.Hard to find much fault when Drinkwitz has only lost one game as a head coach.Of course, the up-and-coming boss of the Tigers also only has one season under his belt. But the 12-win...

OPINION

Sarah Iannarone Demands Action from Mayor Regarding Planned Right-Wing Demonstrations; Opens Safe Space for Portlanders

BIPOC, Queer, and other marginalized Portlanders will bear the brunt of these attacks simply because of their identity or the color of their skin. ...

National Bar Association Statement on Breonna Taylor Decision

Not only was justice not served, the desultory and insufficient result we received today was also unacceptably slow in manifesting. ...

All Officers Responsible for Breonna Taylor’s Murder Must Be Held Accountable

Vanita Gupta, president and CEO of The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, issued a statement in response to the grand jury’s findings regarding the police who murdered Breonna Taylor ...

ACLU Statement on Breonna Taylor Grand Jury Verdict

Carl Takei, senior staff attorney with the ACLU’s Criminal Law Reform Project, issued a statement about today's charges ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

The Latest: Breonna Taylor protesters say they demand change

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — The Latest on a grand jury's decision not to indict police officers on criminal charges directly related to Breonna Taylor's death: (all times EDT)6:25 p.m.An attorney representing Breonna Taylor’s family says she hopes the size and diversity of the crowd...

Family demands release of evidence in Breonna Taylor's case

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Breonna Taylor’s family demanded Friday that Kentucky authorities release all body camera footage, police files and the transcripts of the grand jury proceedings that led to no charges being brought against police officers who killed the Black woman during a...

As campaign heats up, Trump woos Latino, Black voters

ATLANTA, Ga. (AP) — With fewer than 40 days left before the election, President Donald Trump unveiled his second policy plan in as many days as he tries to chip away at his Democratic rival’s support among Black and Hispanic voters and in key battleground states.At a “Black...

ENTERTAINMENT

With spy series 'Tehran,' Israelis reach out to an enemy

NEW YORK (AP) — Things are not as they seem in the new Apple TV+ series “Tehran” — as it should be in a spy thriller. The series opens with a commercial flight from Jordan to India that's suddenly diverted to Iran. A few of the passengers on board have secrets. Those...

Demi Lovato, Max Ehrich call off engagement after 2 months

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Singer-actors Demi Lovato and Max Ehrich have called off their engagement after two months. Lovato and her former fiance have parted ways, according to a person close to Lovato who spoke Thursday on condition of anonymity due to the sensitivity of the matter. The split...

J-pop stars ARASHI release English surprise before hiatus

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Japanese pop sensation ARASHI has a big surprise for fans as they near their planned hiatus at year's end: a collaboration with Bruno Mars on their first all-English single.The band told The Associated Press the multi-Grammy Award-winning musician delved into their...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Desk shortage forces people to get creative about workspaces

NEW YORK (AP) — First it was toilet paper. Disinfectant wipes. Beans. Coins. Computers. Now, desks are in...

Takeaways: Labor abuses in the palm oil industry

PENINSULAR MALAYSIA (AP) — Palm oil is almost impossible to avoid. It can be found in roughly half the...

Trump's 0 prescription cards won't hit mailboxes just yet

WASHINGTON (AP) — If you’re on Medicare, don’t run to the mailbox looking for a 0...

Pope to UN: Use COVID crisis to come out better, not worse

ROME (AP) — Pope Francis urged world leaders Friday to use the coronavirus emergency as an opportunity to...

UAE: Iran's aggressive policies made Arabs look at Israel

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The United Arab Emirates didn’t need peace with Israel to counter Iran, a top...

The other issues: Pandemic focus at UN pushes out key topics

At the United Nations this week, Kenya's president lamented the loss of animal species and called for measures to...

Don't Call the Police for domestic disturbances
Trimet Take the Survey
Jill Lawless and Meera Selva Associated Press

LONDON (AP) -- Residents surveyed shattered streets and arrested more suspects Monday after riots and looting erupted in an impoverished London neighborhood and hopscotched across the city that hosts next summer's Olympic Games.

The unrest was sparked by a police shooting, but some blamed unemployment, insensitive policing and opportunistic looting for the worst violence the city has seen in years. Police and politicians insisted the disorder was the work of a criminal minority and not a sign of social tensions or security lapses ahead of the 2012 Games.

In the hardest-hit area, Tottenham, many residents agreed that the looting was the work of greedy youths, aided by instant communication through SMS texts and instant messaging.

"It's nothing to do with the man who was shot, is it?" said 37-year-old Marcia Simmons, who has lived in the diverse and gritty north London neighborhood all her life. "A lot of youths ... heard there was a protest and joined in. Others used it as an opportunity to kit themselves out, didn't they, with shoes and T-shirts and everything."

Scattered violence continued Monday, with a skirmish breaking out between police and groups of youths in the Hackney area of east London. Several youths attacked shops and windows, and police in riot gear were pelted with pieces of wood and other objects.

Tottenham's main shopping street remained cordoned off, with steam still rising from burned-out buildings, two days after violence broke out amid community anger over a fatal police shooting. Mark Duggan, a 29-year-old father of four, was gunned down in disputed circumstances Thursday in Tottenham.

A peaceful demonstration outside the Tottenham police station turned ugly as several hundred people threw bottles filled with gasoline at police lines and confronted officers with baseball bats and bars on Saturday night. Two police cars and a double-decker bus were set alight, stores were looted and several buildings along Tottenham's main street - five miles (eight kilometers) from the site of the 2012 Olympics - were reduced to smoldering shells.

"I saw cars on fire, and the neighbors came out saying there's a full blown riot," Simmons said. "We saw the bus set alight, and we saw it blow up. All our homes were full of smoke."

Police condemned the "copycat criminal" violence that began Saturday night and hit areas including the leafy suburb of Enfield, a few miles (kilometers) further north; Walthamstow in northeast London, where police said 30 youths vandalized and looted shops; and the busy shopping and tourist district at Oxford Circus, where about 50 people damaged property.

Home Secretary Theresa May, who cut short a vacation to return to London, said Monday that 215 people have been arrested and 27 charged. Police said 35 police officers were injured.

The youngest person charged with an offense so far was an 11-year-old boy accused of burglary, while about 100 of those arrested were 21 or younger, police confirmed.

"There is no excuse for violence, there is no excuse for looting, there is no excuse for thuggery. ... I think this is about sheer criminality," May said.

Police Deputy Assistant Commissioner Steve Kavanagh said Monday the rioting had "changed from a local issue into organized criminality" and promised a "momentous investigation" to track down the perpetrators.

They were relatively small groups of youths - their heads and faces covered - who used social media such as Twitter, mobile phone text messages and instant messaging on BlackBerry cell phones to organize and keep a step ahead of police. One BlackBerry message Sunday, whose authenticity could not be verified, urged young people from across London to converge on Oxford Circus for "pure terror and havoc & free stuff."

Once the preserve of businesspeople, BlackBerry handsets are popular with teenagers, thanks to their free, fast instant messaging system.

Blackberry's manufacturer, Research in Motion, said in a statement: "We feel for those impacted by the riots in London. We have engaged with the authorities to assist in any way we can."

Police said they would be monitoring Twitter feeds and those who incited violence could face arrest.

In the south London neighborhood of Brixton - the scene of riots in the 1980s and 1990s - youths smashed windows, attacked a police car, set fire to garbage bins and stole video games, sportswear and other goods from stores on Sunday night.

Like Brixton, Tottenham is an impoverished area with an ethnically diverse population, a large black community and a history of unrest.

Tottenham was the site of the 1985 Broadwater Farm riots, a series of clashes that led to the fatal stabbing of a police officer and the wounding of nearly 60 others - and underscored tensions between London police and the capital's black community.

Since then police have made concerted, and fairly successful, efforts to build better relations with London's ethnic communities. But mistrust still lingers, and the shooting of Duggan - a popular figure in the community - has stirred old animosities.

Few details of Duggan's death have been released, and in the void rumors have swirled.

Police say Duggan was shot dead when police from Operation Trident - the unit that investigates gun crime in the black community - stopped a cab he was riding in.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission, which is investigating the shooting, said a "non-police firearm" was recovered at the scene, and media reports said a bullet had been found in an officer's radio.

But the Guardian newspaper reported that the bullet in the radio was police-issue, indicating Duggan may not have fired at the officer.

Duggan's family said they did not condone the violence, and politicians condemned attempts to use his death as an excuse for the riots.

"The violence we saw last night had absolutely nothing to do with the death of Mr. Duggan," said Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg.

There are signs of rising social tensions in Britain as the government slashes 80 billion pounds ($130 billion) from public spending by 2015 to reduce the huge deficit, swollen after Britain spent billions bailing out its foundering banks.

The past year has seen mass protests against the tripling of student tuition fees and cuts to public sector pensions. In November, December and March, small groups broke away from large marches in London to loot. In the most notorious episode, rioters attacked a Rolls-Royce carrying Prince Charles and his wife Camilla to a charity concert.

The full impact of spending cuts has yet to be felt, however, and the unemployment rate is stable - although it highest among youth, especially in areas like Tottenham.

Many locals dismissed socio-economic explanations for the riots.

"We are going to get people blaming the economy and what happened last week but that's not the real reason this happened," said Brixton resident Marilyn Moseley, 49. "It's just an excuse for the young ones to come and rob shops."

The riots caught British politicians by surprise. Many, including Prime Minister David Cameron, were on vacation abroad when they broke out. Cameron's office said he had no plans to return early, although May - the government minister in charge of policing - cut short her vacation to return to London.

London Mayor Boris Johnson condemned the "utterly appalling" destruction, but was criticized for saying he would not return early from a family vacation. His spokesman later said Johnson was cutting the holiday short and would be back in London on Tuesday.

"People have lost their homes, businesses and livelihoods through mindless violence," Johnson said in a statement.

For civic leaders and Olympic organizers, the violence was an unwelcome reminder of London's volatility, less than a year before the city hosts the 2012 Games.

The International Olympic Committee said it had confidence in British authorities.

"Security at the Olympic Games is a top priority for the IOC," spokesman Mark Adams said. "It is, however, directly handled by the local authorities, as they know best what is appropriate and proportionate. We are confident they will do a good job in this domain."

Images of buildings and vehicles in flames broadcast around the world were poor publicity for the city as it prepares to host the games.

"You can imagine how stretched the police would be if this were to occur during the Olympics," said Tony Travers, a local government expert at the London School of Economics. "So I think this will create a worry within City Hall and the Home Office.

"It's not so much that this might happen again - unlikely - as that it reminds the people in charge that while the Olympic Games are going on, any other major event is going to be complicated."

Senior politicians, including Clegg, visited Tottenham on Monday in a bid to reassure residents. But many despaired for the future of their community.

"We are the ones who have to live here now," said Simmons. "My son was terrified. He slept in my bed."

She wondered how Tottenham would recover.

"The High Road wasn't great, but it was O.K. I'm thinking it will be like a ghost town now. Why would anyone want to open a business here?" Simmons asked.

---

Danica Kirka, David Stringer and Stephen Wilson contributed to this report.

© 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

OR Lottery OPG 2020
AARP Vote 2020
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

Multnomah County Breastfeeding