06-23-2021  10:21 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Portland Police Halt Minor Traffic Stops, Citing Disparity

Police in Oregon's largest city are being advised to no longer pursue low-level traffic infractions

BREAKING: Loretta Smith Announces Run for Oregon’s New Congressional Seat

Former county commissioner and two-time Portland City Council candidate wants to keep focus on education, police reform.

At 35, Felix Makes a Comeback and Lands Her 5th Olympics

The 35-year-old mom rallied from fifth at the start of the homestretch to the second-place finish at U.S. track trials.

11 U.S. Mayors Commit to Develop Reparations Pilot Projects

Eleven U.S. mayors — from Los Angeles to tiny Tullahassee, Oklahoma — have pledged to pay reparations for slavery to a small group of Black residents in their cities, saying their aim is to set an example for the federal government on how a nationwide program could work

NEWS BRIEFS

Oregon Lawmakers Pass Amendment to 'Pause' Evictions

With the state and federal eviction moratorium set to expire at the end of June, Oregon lawmakers passed an added safety net for...

Burn Ban in Effect in Multnomah County

Due to forecasted high temperatures, limited rainfall, and ongoing dry conditions, the outdoor burn ban is for all areas of Multnomah...

PCC Won't Require Students, Staff to Be Vaccinated This Fall

Behind this decision are several factors: ...

Vancouver Housing Authority Seeks Hotels and Motels to Turn Into Affordable Housing

Vancouver Housing Authority is on the hunt for hotels and motels to purchase for conversion to affordable housing. ...

Seniors Need Fans to Keep Cool in Hot Weather

Meals on Wheels People is again asking for donations of new or gently-used fans to help keep homebound seniors cool and healthy ...

Western drought brings another woe: voracious grasshoppers

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A punishing drought in the U.S. West is drying up waterways, sparking wildfires and leaving farmers scrambling for water. Next up: a plague of voracious grasshoppers. Federal agriculture officials are launching what could become their largest...

Testosterone rule keeps transgender runner out of trials

EUGENE, Ore. (AP) — Transgender runner CeCe Telfer will not be allowed to compete in the women's 400-meter hurdles at U.S. Olympic trials because Telfer has not met the conditions World Athletics established in its eligibility regulations for certain women's events. Telfer...

OPINION

Rx Upper Payment Limit Bill Will Worsen Chronic Disease for Oregonians Most at Risk

A measure being considered by Oregon state legislature will perpetuate a harmful trend for Oregon’s communities of color. ...

COMMENTARY: 100 Days of Biden-Harris

I see the trillion price tag on the Biden legislation as more of an investment than simple spending. ...

Power and Pride to the People!

Happy Pride month to Black LGBTQ readers and to all of us who love LGBTQ people! ...

You Are Not an Imposter

felt I didn’t belong and secretly, I was waiting for the program to tell me that they made a mistake in my admission. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Buckingham Palace releases ethnic makeup of workforce

LONDON (AP) — Buckingham Palace has for the first time released figures on the ethnic makeup of its staff, following the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s allegations of racism in the royal family. The Royal Household said Thursday that 8.5% of its staff come from ethnic...

Chicago confirms 1st Black woman as city fire commissioner

CHICAGO (AP) — The Chicago City Council on Wednesday confirmed the appointment of the city’s first Black female fire commissioner. Annette Nance-Holt was serving as acting fire commissioner following the retirement earlier this year of Richard Ford. ...

Arizona GOP advances wish list on race, taxes, elections

PHOENIX (AP) — The Arizona Senate passed a .8 billion budget for the coming fiscal year early Wednesday that contains massive income tax cuts after a marathon session where majority Republicans packed the package with a conservative policy wish list. Republicans in last...

ENTERTAINMENT

'To Live and Die in LA' returns to search for missing woman

NEW YORK (AP) — In 2019, a listener of writer Neil Strauss' podcast “ To Live and Die in LA ” came forward with information that helped solve the case of a 25-year-old missing woman, Adea Shabani. The revelations were released in almost real time, and listening seemed intimate, not to mention...

Review: Doja Cat album stumbles at first but finishes strong

Doja Cat, “Planet Her" (Kemosabe/RCA) Not to be totally catty, but Doja Cat's third album starts poorly. The first four songs — “Woman,” “Naked,” “Payday” with Young Thug and “Get Into It (Yuh)” — are half-baked tunes mimicking beats and vocals from Nicki...

Tenor Jonas Kaufmann takes on Tristan, opera’s voice killer

NEW YORK (AP) — Ten years ago, Jonas Kaufmann didn’t hesitate when asked if he was ready to take on heavy Wagnerian roles like the hero of “Tristan und Isolde.” “I don’t want to get into the history books as one of the youngest Tristans ever, and who lost his voice...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Bodies of two young girls pulled from South Florida canal

LAUDERHILL, Fla. (AP) — Police are looking into reports that the mother of two young girls found dead in a South...

Michigan Senate GOP probe: No systemic fraud in election

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — State Senate Republicans who investigated Michigan's 2020 presidential election for months...

Border Patrol chief who supported Trump's wall is forced out

CALEXICO, Calif. (AP) — The chief of the U.S. Border Patrol was forced out of his job Wednesday, after less than...

Lisbon drives virus surge as Portugal is chided for failings

LISBON, Portugal (AP) — The Lisbon region’s surge in COVID-19 cases is powering ahead, with new infections...

Tokyo shapes up to be No-Fun Olympics with many rules, tests

TOKYO (AP) — The Tokyo Olympics, already delayed by the pandemic, are not looking like much fun: Not for...

Europe seeks disabled astronauts, more women in space

PARIS (AP) — The European Space Agency says it was “blown away” by the record number of applicants — more...

Sarah El Deeb Associated Press

Ousted leader Hosni Mubarak

CAIRO (AP) -- Tens of thousands of Egyptians braved scorching summer heat to hold one of their biggest protests in months Friday, filling streets in Cairo and other cities to demand trials for members of Hosni Mubarak's regime and express frustration with the slow pace of change.

The exhilaration of Mubarak's ouster on Feb. 11 after 18 days of mass protests has yielded to widespread frustration that "the revolution" has stalled. The economy remains sluggish and many are confused about what comes next. Some are demanding that the country's military rulers, who took power after Mubarak, push back parliamentary elections set for September because most political factions are not ready.

Many complain that although Mubarak and many hated figures under him have lost power, the key elements of his regime remain in the judiciary, the police and the civil service.

Doubts have also begun to grow about the council of ruling generals, which has faced protests and riots for what some see as its reluctance to prosecute police and former regime officials accused of complicity in the killing of nearly 900 protesters during the uprising.

"The military council is being wishy-washy," said protester Mohammed al-Tayyib in Cairo's Tahrir Square, the epicenter of the uprising that toppled Mubarak. "No one is being brought to trial and nothing is moving."

Earlier this week, seven policemen in the city of Suez were freed on bail during their trial for the killing of the protesters. Their release set off two days of riots by angry families who accused the judiciary of corruption. Other former regime officials were acquitted on corruption charges, also raising the ire of many.

"Things are going in the wrong direction," said protester Lilian Wagdy. She complained of the many civilians convicted by military courts while trials of security officials are often postponed or release the accused.

In scenes reminiscent of the 18 day uprising, civilian checkpoints were erected around Tahrir to prevent thugs from mixing in with demonstrators and potentially causing violence since no police or military were in the area.

Banners fluttered in the wind and a large white cloth had the words "Retribution from the killers of martyrs" painted on it. Fliers read: "Real cleansing. Real government. Real trials."

Crowds clustered under an improvised canopy and sought shade under blankets and placards. Wandering merchants sold cold water and ice cream. Egypt's Health Ministry said ambulances carried 54 people from the square by mid-afternoon, most of them suffering from heat exhaustion.

With the rally, dubbed "Friday of Accountability," organizers were seeking to restore some unity in Egypt's protest movement, which has fragmented since Mubarak's fall. The Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's most organized political group, and ultraconservative Salafis decided to join the protests after staying away from others in past weeks.

The theme of justice allowed the various factions to patch over for the moment differences over the transition. Many liberal and secular activists demand that the ruling military push back the parliament elections, saying political parties can't be ready in time for September.

The Muslim Brotherhood, which is the best prepared for the race, strongly opposes any delay.

The secretive council of generals in power has so far refused any postponement, but it has also failed to set an exact date for the election or start preparations for holding it - increasing the confusion and disenchantment with what some see as the military's mismanagement of the transition.

To ramp up pressure, protesters said Friday's demonstration would launch an open-ended sit-in until their demands are met. It was not clear if that would go ahead but dozens of tents were erected in the Cairo square.

"The military council makes decisions when we are here. When we were silent, nothing happens," said Mona Farag, 45, who said her three sons were planning to remain in the square.

She expressed a common frustration with the military rulers, whose tendency to communicate mostly through messages on their Facebook page has led many to see them as aloof and out of touch.

"We are going to stay here until someone from the military council comes out and tell us what's going on," she said.

Protesters also massed Friday at main squares in Suez and Alexandria, the two coastal cities that have also witnessed violent clashes between security forces and protesters during the uprising. In Alexandria, protesters carried a large cloth with the colors of the Egyptian flag; and a large banner on the seaside read: "Retribution."

In Suez, a man fired a gunshot toward the rally and was detained by organizers, said a witness, Ahmed Khafagi.

In the southern city of Assiut, hundreds of protesters set up a tent camp in a main city square to prepare for a sit-in for the first time in the conservative south.

In an unusual show of anger in southern Egypt, the protesters chanted against the military council, which is led by Field Marshal Mohammed Hussein Tantawi.

"They removed and brought the field marshal. That means there is no change," the protesters shouted.

In the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh, scores of protesters gathered outside the hospital where Mubarak is under arrest, demanding to see proof that he is inside. "Hosni, Get Out!" the protesters shouted, amid tight security presence.

In an attempt to defuse public anger, a prosecutor on Thursday charged 25 Mubarak-era officials with manslaughter, attempted murder and assault for their part in organizing a February attack on anti-regime protesters in which assailants on horses and camels charged into the crowds.

© 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events