10-15-2019  9:37 am   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Hank Willis Thomas Exhibit Opens at Portland Art Museum

One of the most important conceptual artists of our time, his works examine the representation of race and the politics of visual culture

Grocery Workers Union Ratifies Contract with Stores

The United Food and Commercial Workers Union has agreed a three-year contract for stores in Oregon and Southwest Washington

PCC Weighing Community Input on Workforce Training Center, Affordable Housing in Cully

Portland Community College is compiling the results of door-to-door and online surveys

Lawsuit Filed Against Hilton Hotels in “Calling His Mother While Black” Discrimination Case

Jermaine Massey was ousted from the DoubleTree Hotel in Portland where he was a guest and forced to find lodging at around midnight

NEWS BRIEFS

Protesters Rally in Ashland to Demand 'Impeach Trump Now'

Activists are rallying in Ashland Sunday Oct, 13 to demand impeachment proceedings ...

Black Women Help Kick off Sustainable Building Week

The event will be held at Portland’s first and only “green building” owned and operated by African-American women ...

Voter Registration Deadline for the November Special Election is Oct. 15 

The Special Election in Multnomah County will be held on Nov. 5, 2019 ...

Franklin High School’s Mercedes Muñoz Named Oregon Teacher of the Year

In a letter of recommendation, Muñoz was referred to as “a force of nurture.” ...

Founder of Black Panther Challenge Creates Brand To Support Mental Health

The launch comes during Mental Health Awareness Week. The creators say they want people around the world to know that they aren’t...

AP Midseason All-America Team: Burrow, Taylor lead 1st team

LSU quarterback Joe Burrow, who is on a record-breaking pace during the first half of the season, and Wisconsin running back Jonathan Taylor highlight The Associated Press midseason All-America team released Tuesday.No. 2 LSU, No. 6 Wisconsin and No. 12 Oregon each placed three players on the first...

West Nile virus case recorded in Crook County horse

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — State health officials say a case of West Nile virus has been confirmed in a horse east of Bend.The Oregonian/OregonLive reports West Nile virus was first recorded in Oregon in 2003, but this is the first case recorded in Crook County.The virus, which can spread in...

Bryant bounces back to lead Missouri over Mississippi

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Last week, when he heard a pop in his left knee after being hit low, Missouri quarterback Kelly Bryant briefly saw his college football career pass before his eyes. The injury wasn't as bad as it looked, and Bryant played like his old self in a 38-27 victory over...

Missouri out to stop Ole Miss ground game in SEC matchup

Ole Miss coach Matt Luke has watched every game Missouri has played this season, and he was no doubt excited by the way Wyoming ran wild against the Tigers in their season opener.It should have portended good things for the Rebels' own vaunted rushing attack.But the more Luke looked at the video,...

OPINION

“Hell No!” That Is My Message to Those Who Would Divide Us 

Upon release from the South African jail, Nelson Mandela told UAW Local 600 members “It is you who have made the United States of America a superpower, a leader of the world" ...

Rep. Janelle Bynum Issues Response to the Latest Statement from Clackamas Town Center

State legislator questions official response after daughter questioned for ‘loitering’ in parking lot ...

Why Would HUD Gut Its Own Disparate Impact Rule?

"You can’t expand housing rights by limiting civil protections. The ’D’ in HUD doesn’t stand for ‘Discrimination’" ...

Despite U.S. Open Loss, Serena Williams Is Still the Greatest of All Time

Serena Williams lost her bid for what would have been her sixth U.S. Open Singles title ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

President of Bulgarian soccer resigns after fan racism, loss

SOFIA, Bulgaria (AP) — Criticized around Europe for the racist behavior of Bulgarian fans and under pressure from the country's prime minister following a run of poor results, the president of the country's soccer federation resigned on Tuesday.A few hours later, Bulgarian special police...

Money, hatred for the Kurds drives Turkey's Syrian fighters

BEIRUT (AP) — The Syrian fighters vowed to kill "pigs" and "infidels," paraded their Kurdish captives in front of cameras and, in one graphic video, fired several rounds into a man lying on the side of a highway with his hands bound behind his back.They are part of the self-styled Syrian...

The Latest: 0,000 bond set for ex-cop charged with murder

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — The Latest on the fatal police shooting of a black woman inside her own home in Fort Worth (all times local):8:25 p.m.A 0,000 bond has been set for a white former police officer jailed in the fatal shooting of a black woman inside the woman's Fort Worth home.Aaron...

ENTERTAINMENT

Ex-inmate Cyntoia Brown-Long argues for redemption in memoir

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Cyntoia Brown-Long, now 31 years old, knows as much about life in prison as she does about being free.At 16, she was arrested for robbing and killing a man she says picked her up for sex and later was sentenced to life in prison. But two months ago, Brown-Long walked...

ABC apologizes for video wrongly said to be from Syria

NEW YORK (AP) — ABC News is apologizing for airing a video that it said depicted a Turkish attack on Kurds in Syria, but instead was taken at a military gun demonstration in Kentucky.The brief footage was aired on "World News Tonight" Sunday and "Good Morning America" on Monday. The network...

Farrow details lack of enthusiasm at NBC for Weinstein story

NEW YORK (AP) — In reporter Ronan Farrow's account of his contentious divorce from NBC News, the more evidence he gathered on Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein's alleged sexual misconduct, the less enthusiastic his bosses seemed to be.NBC's decision to let Farrow take his work to The New...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

AP Midseason All-America Team: Burrow, Taylor lead 1st team

LSU quarterback Joe Burrow, who is on a record-breaking pace during the first half of the season, and Wisconsin...

AP Exclusive: Julie Andrews reflects on her Hollywood years

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Everyone is on their best behavior when Julie Andrews is around.It's early June in Los...

AP analysis: Most states lack laws protecting LGBT workers

Rumors started circulating around the fire station in Byron, Georgia, within a year after the medical treatments...

Tour boat captain not to blame in deadly Danube crash

BUDAPEST, Hungary (AP) — Experts have concluded that the captain of a sightseeing boat that collided on the...

France: Vote set to legalize IVF for lesbians, single women

PARIS (AP) — France's lower house of parliament is expected to approve a bill that would give single women...

7-story building collapses in Brazil; 1 dead, others trapped

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — A seven-story building collapsed Tuesday in an upscale part of the Brazilian city of...

McMenamins
Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Another unintended consequence of President Barack Obama's health care law has emerged: Older adults of the same age and income with similar medical histories could pay widely different amounts for private health insurance due to a quirk of the complex legislation.

Those differences could be substantial. A 62-year-old could end up paying $1,200 a year more than his neighbor, in one example. And experts say the disparities among married couples would be much larger.

Aware of the problem, the Obama administration says it is exploring options to head off another potential controversy over the health care overhaul. Starting in 2014, the law expands coverage to more than 30 million uninsured people and requires most Americans to carry insurance.

The glitch affects mainly older adults who are too young for a Medicare card but have reached 62, when people can qualify for early retirement from Social Security. Sixty-two is the most common age at which Americans start taking Social Security, although their monthly benefit is reduced.

As the law now stands, those who take early retirement would get a significant break on their health insurance premiums. Part or all of their Social Security benefits would not be counted as income in figuring out whether they can get federal subsidies to help pay their premiums until they join Medicare at 65.

"There is an equity issue here," said Robert Laszewski, a former health insurance executive turned policy consultant. "If you get a job for 40 hours a week, you're going to pay more for your health insurance than if you don't get a job."

The administration says it is working on the problem.

"We are monitoring this issue and exploring options that would take into account the needs of Social Security beneficiaries, many of whom are disabled or individuals of limited means," Emily McMahon, a top Treasury Department policy official, said in a statement to The Associated Press.

Other officials, speaking on condition of anonymity because the issue is politically sensitive, said the administration is concerned that the situation could create a perception that hard-working people get a worse deal compared with less-industrious peers.

McMahon doubted the health care discount would start a stampede toward early retirement at a time when many experts are urging older Americans to stay on the job longer. Only a "limited number of individuals" would decide they're better off not working, she said.

To see how the Social Security wrinkle would work, consider a hypothetical example of two neighbors on the same block.

They are both 62 and each makes $39,500 a year. But one gets all his income from working, while the other gets $20,000 from part-time work and $19,500 from Social Security.

Neither gets health insurance on the job. Instead, they purchase it individually.

Starting in 2014, they would get their coverage through a new online health insurance market called an exchange. Millions of people in the exchanges would get federal tax credits, based on income, to make their premiums more affordable. Less-healthy consumers could not be turned away or charged more because of their medical problems.

The neighbor getting Social Security would pay an estimated $206 a month in premiums.

But the neighbor who makes all his income from work would pay $313 for health insurance, or about 50 percent more.

The early retiree can shield half his Social Security income, or $9,750. On paper, he would look poorer, making him eligible for a bigger tax credit to offset his premiums. But the full-time worker could not deduct any of his earnings.

The estimates were produced using an online calculator from the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation.

The disparities appear to be even greater for married couples and families in which at least one member is getting Social Security. With a bigger household, both the cost of coverage and the federal subsidies involved are considerably larger.

The glitch seems to be the result of an effort by Congress to make things simpler. Lawmakers decided to use the definition of income in the tax code, which protects Social Security benefits from taxation.

It's unclear whether the administration can fix the problem with a regulation, or whether it will have to go back to Congress. In case of the latter, it will have to deal with Republicans eager to repeal the health care law.

The decision to use the tax code's definition of income has created other problems.


Medicare's top number-cruncher is warning that up to 3 million middle-class people in households that get at least part of their income from Social Security could suddenly become eligible for nearly free coverage through Medicaid, the federal-state safety net program for the poor. Chief Actuary Richard Foster says that situation "just doesn't make sense."

mlkbreakfast2020 tickets 300x180

Pacific University Master in Fine Arts Writing
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

Seattle Pay by Plate