06-05-2020  6:38 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Thousands March Peacefully for 7th Night in Portland

NBA Portland Trail Blazer star Damian Lillard walked at the front of the crowd arm-in-arm with young demonstrators

Districts Jettison School Police Officers Amid Protests

Mayor Ted Wheeler: “Leaders must listen and respond to community. We must disrupt the patterns of racism and injustice.”

Two De La Salle North Grads Forge Thrilling Paths

A med student and a Fulbright scholar reflect on their time at the school.

OHSU Resident Uses TikTok, Student Outreach, to Show Representation in Medicine

A group of high school students weighing careers in health care were recently greeted on Google Meet by a physician whose social media star is on the rise.

NEWS BRIEFS

Resources for Supporting Racial Justice in Oregon

Learn about how to get involved with local organizations that have been fighting for decades for racial justice. ...

Business Donates Profits

On Sunday, June 7, the owners of Pine State Biscuits are donating all of their profits to the NAACP and ACLU from all five of their...

NAMC-Oregon Statement on Racism, Inequity & Violence Against Black People

All of us at NAMC-Oregon are angered and deeply saddened by the police murder of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and the...

Civil Rights and Social Justice Organizations Call for a National Day of Mourning Today

At 12:45 p.m. PT today, the NAACP is asking for everyone to take a moment of silence for 8 minutes and 46 seconds. ...

ACLU Files Class Action Lawsuit Against Minneapolis Police for Attacking Journalists at Protests

The lawsuit’s lead plaintiff, Jared Goyette, a journalist covering the demonstrations, was shot in the face with a rubber bullet ...

Seattle mayor bans 1 type of tear gas amid protests

SEATTLE (AP) — The Seattle mayor has banned the police use of one form of tear gas as protests continue in the city and nationally over the killing of George Floyd. Mayor Jenny Durkan said in a news conference Friday afternoon that the ban on CS gas would continue for 30 days. The move came...

Multnomah County applies to ease coronavirus restrictions

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Multnomah County officials submitted reopening framework to Gov. Kate Brown’s office Friday in the hope of beginning phase 1 of the state’s plan to ease COVID-19 restrictions.If approved, restaurants in Multnomah County on June 12 could once again offer...

Kansas, Missouri renew Border War with 4-game football set

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Kansas and Missouri are resuming their bitter Border War in football after the former Big 12 rivals agreed to a four-game series in which each school will play two home games beginning in September 2025.The fourth-longest rivalry in college football dates to 1891, but...

OPINION

Responding to Challenging Questions in a Nation Still in Upheaval

Nate McCoy attempts to answer tough questions in a letter to his sons ...

Mayor Ted Wheeler: Portland and the Path Forward

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler invites Portlanders, as public servants, to join him "in insisting that we never return to business as usual." ...

Local Business Leaders Share Messages of Hope

President, CEO of SAIF says each of us must move forward in "our understanding of the problem, in holding ourselves accountable for our own attitudes and biases, and in coming together, not apart." ...

Time to Stop Messing Around and Strike at the Root of Police Violence

Thomas Knapp says the root of police violence is the creation of "police forces" as state institutions separate from the populace and dedicated to suppressing that populace on command ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Demonstrators vow to sustain momentum until change happens

WASHINGTON (AP) — Protesters stirred by the death of George Floyd vowed Friday to turn an extraordinary outpouring of grief into a sustained movement as demonstrations shifted to a calmer, but no less determined focus on addressing racial injustice. In Minneapolis, where Floyd died in police...

The Latest: Minneapolis and St. Paul no longer under curfew

TOP OF THE HOUR:— Minneapolis-St. Paul curfew over as troopers, National Guard to be sent home— Seattle mayor bans police use of tear gas for 30 days.— Phoenix woman says her brother's death three years ago was similar to Floyd's.— California governor orders end to holds...

Seattle mayor bans 1 type of tear gas amid protests

SEATTLE (AP) — The Seattle mayor has banned the police use of one form of tear gas as protests continue in the city and nationally over the killing of George Floyd. Mayor Jenny Durkan said in a news conference Friday afternoon that the ban on CS gas would continue for 30 days. The move came...

ENTERTAINMENT

New York Times says senator’s op-ed didn’t meet standards

NEW YORK (AP) — In an embarrassing about-face, The New York Times said Thursday that an opinion piece it ran by U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton advocating the use of federal troops to quell nationwide protests about police mistreatment of black Americans did not meet its standards.Cotton's op-ed,...

CMT special focuses on good news work of everyday heroes

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Country stars highlighted the heroic work of citizens and communities around the country who were coming together to help each other in the middle of the coronavirus epidemic during the "CMT Celebrates Our Heroes" TV special.But Wednesday's show largely didn't address...

Ill-considered posts lead to lost jobs amid protests, crisis

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A writer from a “Law & Order" spin-off and the play-by-play broadcaster for the NBA’s Sacramento Kings found themselves out of jobs after making social media posts this week that their bosses found too incendiary or insensitive, highlighting an apparent...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Jordan giving 0 million for racial equality, justice

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Michael Jordan and the Jordan Brand are giving 0 million to organizations...

Officers suspended after man, 75, shoved and hurt on video

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — Prosecutors were investigating Friday after a video captured police in Buffalo shoving...

AP PHOTOS: Images of calm emerge after days of protests

Amid the anger, violence and grief evident in the massive protests shaking the country after the death of George...

The Latest: NM high court suspends consumer debt collection

SANTA FE, N.M. — The New Mexico Supreme Court is temporarily suspending consumer debt collection such as...

UN health agency: Wear mask if you can't keep your distance

The World Health Organization is broadening its recommendations for the use of masks during the coronavirus...

Pandemic accelerates Mormon missionaries' transition online

BRIGHAM CITY, Utah (AP) — Wearing dress shirts, ties and name tags, three missionaries with The Church of...

McMenamins
By Erica Werner of the Associated Press

JOPLIN, Mo. – Europe's splendor behind him, Missouri rubble in front of him, President Barack Obama on Sunday toured the devastation wrought by a monster tornado, consoled the bereaved and committed the government to helping Joplin rebuild until the job is done.

"This is not just your tragedy. This is a national tragedy, and that means there will be a national response," Obama said.

Air Force One flew over a massive swath of brown as far as the eye could see — a landscape of flattened houses and stripped trees — on its approach. Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon and others greeted him on the tarmac before they set out for their first stop, a walking tour of a destroyed neighborhood. A memorial service later was punctuating a day of remembrance one week after the disaster.

Obama's motorcade pulled into a neighborhood where downed trees cleaved open houses, roofs were stripped or blown off, cars were cratered and splintered wood was everywhere. He saw nothing whole, but rather small domestic sights — a view into a room with a TV still in place, a recliner sitting amid rubble, a washer-dryer standing next to a decimated house. American flags were planted here and there in the mess.

"Sorry for your loss," Obama told an anguished woman, hugging her twice as they talked. Another woman told him that her uncle lives up the road — he survived but his house did not. "Tell your uncle we're praying for him," the president said.

To those working at the scene, the president said: "We appreciate everything you guys are doing. God bless you." One volunteer told him that people were streaming in from other states to help any way they could.

Obama vowed: "We are going to be here long after the cameras leave. We're not going to stop `til Joplin's back on its feet."

Obama returned to the U.S. on Saturday from a six-day European tour of Ireland, Britain, France and Poland. After days of focusing on the U.S. relationship with the rest of the world, he turned to an even more critical connection: his own, with the American people. He was visiting survivors and the bereaved from the worst tornado in decades, which tore through Joplin a week ago leaving more than 120 dead and hundreds more injured. At least 40 remain unaccounted for, and the damage is massive.

Consoling his fellow Americans is a task Obama has had to assume with increasing frequency of late, after the mass shooting in Arizona in January in which Rep. Gabrielle Giffords was injured, when tornadoes struck Tuscaloosa, Ala., last month and, more recently, when flooding from the Mississippi inundated parts of Memphis, Tenn.

Such moments can help define a president, but habitually even-tempered Obama is more apt to offer handshakes and hugs than tears and deep emotion.

Though times of trouble can erase politics and unite people, a phenomenon Obama has commented on, his task as healer Sunday unfolded on unfriendly political ground as his re-election campaign approaches. Obama narrowly lost Missouri to Republican John McCain in 2008, but in Jasper County, where Joplin is located, McCain won by a large margin: 66 percent to 33 percent.

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