09-20-2019  1:12 pm   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

New Treasurer Steps In At Multnomah Dems

Self-described ‘boring guy’ Dean Price steps in amid party tensions

Governor's Lawyer Declines Court Nod Amid Uproar

Misha Isaak has declined his appointment by Gov. Kate Brown to the Court of Appeals after the state's public records advocate accused him of unethical behavior

Resignation of Oregon Public Records Advocate Stirs Doubts

Ginger McCall says Brown's general counsel pressured her to secretly advocate for governor's office

NEWS BRIEFS

Buffalo Soldier Dedication to Be Held at Fort Vancouver on Saturday, Sept. 21

The installation will be the first African-American memorial in the city of Vancouver ...

Africa-America Institute Set to Honor Angola, New York Times Magazine, and Netflix Film During 35th Annual Awards Gala

New York City’s premiere Africa event takes place during the week of the United Nations General Assembly’s 73rd session. ...

YouTube Originals Debuts Michelle Obama’s Reacher College Prep Course

‘A Student’s Guide to Your First Year of College’ debuted last week ...

Portland students join global climate protests

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Thousands of students demanding action on the global climate crisis walked out of class in Portland, Oregon, part of global protests that stretched from Australia to South America.KOIN reports that students rallied Friday outside City Hall, making demands of Mayor Ted...

Prosecutors say key witness lied in motorcycle gang trial

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Prosecutors have asked a judge in Las Vegas to throw out the testimony of a key witness in a federal racketeering trial after they say he lied on the witness stand.The trial stems from a 2011 shootout that killed a rival Hells Angels leader in a northern Nevada...

South Carolina tries to keep success against Missouri going

The only player on the Missouri roster who knows what it's like to beat South Carolina is Kelly Bryant, and the quarterback transfer didn't even accomplish the feat with the Tigers.He did it two years ago while playing for Clemson.The Tigers, who welcome South Carolina to Faurot Field for their SEC...

SEC building some of the top defenses in college football

While defenses are still a work in progress around the Southeastern Conference, they still rank as some of the best in college football.Florida leads the nation with 16 sacks, including 10 in the opener against rival Miami. Missouri, Tennessee and Georgia combined to shut out overmatched opponents...

OPINION

Why Would HUD Gut Its Own Disparate Impact Rule?

"You can’t expand housing rights by limiting civil protections. The ’D’ in HUD doesn’t stand for ‘Discrimination’" ...

Despite U.S. Open Loss, Serena Williams Is Still the Greatest of All Time

Serena Williams lost her bid for what would have been her sixth U.S. Open Singles title ...

Do Black Kids Deserve This Treatment in School?

Three White Pearland ISD employees are named in a federal lawsuit after humiliating a 13-year-old Black student by blackening his scalp with a Sharpie ...

Why I’m Visiting the Border

People of color are feeling less safe today and any day when we see the realities of domestic terrorism and racially-motivated acts of violence ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Judge refuses to toss Coast Guard officer's gun charges

COLLEGE PARK, Md. (AP) — A federal judge on Friday refused to dismiss gun charges against a Coast Guard lieutenant accused of being a domestic terrorist who stockpiled weapons and drafted a hit list of prominent Democrats and TV journalists.U.S. District Judge George Hazel rejected defense...

2 Muslims accuse American Airlines of religious profiling

DALLAS (AP) — Two Texas men who are Muslim say they were profiled when their American Airlines flight was canceled after crew members felt uncomfortable because the men waved to each other.Abderraoof Alkhawaldeh and Issam Abdallah say they have filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of...

Indonesia's president delays vote on new criminal code

JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Indonesia's president urged lawmakers on Friday to delay a vote on a proposed new criminal code amid mounting criticism of the bill, which opponents say threatens democracy and discriminates against minorities.Updating Indonesia's criminal code, a legacy of the...

ENTERTAINMENT

Galifianakis and Aukerman on 'Between 2 Ferns: The Movie'

NEW YORK (AP) — Some Netflix titles involve anguished discussion over whether the movie will also get a substantial theatrical release. This was not the case for "Between Two Ferns: The Movie.""Netflix was like: Do we even want to put this on our platform? Maybe it should be a ringtone,"...

'Game of Thrones,' 'Veep' make last Emmy Awards stand

LOS ANGELES (AP) — "Game of Thrones" has dominated the Emmy Awards with the formidable power of, say, your average fearsome, flame-belching dragon. Same goes for "Veep," but picture a cutthroat politician instead.The drama and comedy series are among the front-runners for Sunday's ceremony...

'House Hunters' host Suzanne Whang dies at 57

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Suzanne Whang, whose smooth, calm voice provided the narration for HGTV's "House Hunters" for years, has died. She was 57.Her Tuesday death was confirmed Friday by her longtime agent, Eddie Culbertson. Whang first gained fame as the on-screen host of the show, where...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

It's no joke: women rule the Emmy comedy series category

LOS ANGELES (AP) — When the winner of the best comedy series Emmy Award is announced Sunday, odds are good...

Nike drops Pats' Brown amid 2nd accusation; Belichick mum

Nike has cut ties with Antonio Brown, and New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick is through answering questions...

Facebook says it has suspended 'tens of thousands' of apps

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Facebook said Friday that it has suspended "tens of thousands" of apps made by about...

The Latest: Young Mexicans urge leaders to act on climate

NEW YORK (AP) — The Latest on the global climate protests being held in cities around the world (all times...

Hurricane Lorena nears Mexico's resort-studded Los Cabos

CABO SAN LUCAS, Mexico (AP) — Hurricane Lorena neared Mexico's resort-studded Los Cabos area Friday as...

Cubans wait hours in gas lines as fuel crisis bites

HAVANA (AP) — A fuel shortage blamed on the Trump Administration has turned filling a tank in Cuba into an...

McMenamins
The Associated Press

The waters of the Mississippi River have become a creeping monster that has swallowed the homes of some and left others to wonder how unforgiving the river may be.

In Mississippi, many don't know how long it will be before their houses finally dry out. Farther downstream in Louisiana, others wait, contemplating if the predictions that their rooftops could soon be swamped will come to pass. The Skanner News Video

The river, swollen by rainfall and snowmelt, has reached its apex in places like Vicksburg, Miss. The murky waters are continuing their slow trek toward communities in Louisiana, taking far longer than first expected.

The Army Corps of Engineers opened the Morganza spillway more than a week ago, hoping to spare heavily populated Baton Rouge and New Orleans from potentially catastrophic flooding. So far, the plan has worked. Now, the water splashes through the floodgates into the Atchafalaya River basin, inching its way toward places like the oil-and-seafood hub of Morgan City.

AMELIA, La. — Russel Andras carries the marks of a life lived on the oil patch — his skin bronzed, lines burned around his eyes, his 71-year-old body still in pretty good shape.

But the Mississippi's rampage is sending a new kind of trouble his way.

A year after the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and the ensuing embargo on oil drilling, the fabricating company Andras has run for 30 years was just getting back to business. Then the Corps opened the Morganza spillway, sending the Mississippi River's brown water into the Atchafalaya River, and spilling over Bayou Boeuf, where Andras' company operates.

Last year, Andras had close to 600 employees before the oil spill. Now, he has fewer than 150. Last week, most of them were busy building racks to lift equipment above the floodwaters, sandbagging and shutting down electrical connections.

"Things were just starting to pick up again," said Andras, whose company fabricates metal for oil drilling operations. "But the contracts we have are on tight deadlines, and we can't make them with all my workers picking up for the flood."

While his workers moved equipment and filled sandbags, Andras was working the phones, talking to clients, explaining what was happening, asking them to understand.

The waiting is the hardest part, Andras said. Waiting to see how high the water will go, waiting to see if his business and house will survive.

"It's another tough blow," he said. "Things were just starting to get a little better, but this flood could make it really bad. Really bad."

VIDALIA, La. — Arty Person has spent half his 44 years farming. He raises rice, corn, cotton and soy beans on 4,000 acres in Concordia Parish in east-central Louisiana.

It was never an easy job, but never has it been this difficult.

"I'm flooded on one side of the levee and drying out on the other," Person said with a rueful grin. "And it looks like what isn't dried up or drowned will be eaten by the deer."

Many of Louisiana's parishes had been stricken by drought — and many of those are now flooded. It had been the year farmers were supposed to get caught up and pay off their bills, with ethanol demand pushing corn prices higher and soy beans and cotton fetching good prices, too.

Now, Person is left to worry about the seepage — water pushed to the surface of his field by the river's pressure against the levees — that will rot his plants.

"If the river goes down quickly, if we don't get a lot of rain, those crops might make it," Person said. Then again, he needs the rain for the fields drying out.

Worse still, wild hogs and other wildlife are digging and wallowing in his fields. Deer are finding a free meal, eating the fields bare. He rides the fields through the night with a gas gun, which makes a loud noise to scare off the animals. It isn't working.

"I think they've pretty well gotten used to it," Person said. "It doesn't scare them much anymore."

PORT GIBSON, Miss. — The Rev. Eddie Walls Jr., 83, lives in a town that Civil War Union Gen. Ulysses S. Grant said was "too beautiful to burn."

Beauty is not what comes to mind in the small hotel room Walls shares with his 52-year-old daughter Linda and her 30-year-old autistic son. The room is crowded and cluttered. Clothes and other belongings are scattered about. Privacy does not exist.Days grind by in conditions like these. And to make things worse, the money for the hotel room might dry up before the water does. They can't get home because of flooded streets. They can only pray that it isn't flooded.

"There's not a thing in the world you can do about it but pray," Walls said, wearing plaid pajamas and clutching a cane as he sat on the edge of a hotel bed.

Linda sat on the other side of the bed. Her son clung to a brown bear and watched TV, the covers pulled high, almost covering his face.

"But we're together as a family," Linda said.

"If you don't have family, what do you have? Not a thing in the world. We're taking it a day at a time, and God is going to work it out."

CUTOFF, Miss. — Harry Johnson, a retired mechanic, found his corner of paradise in a little community that sprang from fishing camps.

Cutoff, in Mississippi's Tunica County, is on the unprotected side of the Mississippi River levee and is under water. It wasn't so bad for Johnson, a grown man, to gather up his most prized possessions to rescue before the floodwaters hit. For his 10-year-old daughter, such a task was unmerciful.

"When I went in her room, I just fell apart," Johnson said while sitting on a shelter cot in a dimly lit gymnasium. "How do you pick which of your child's toys to take and which ones to leave behind? And then there's all the little art stuff she made. I was just beside myself."

Cutoff is a community where "600 people know each other's names" and most travel around in golf carts. Like many residents, Johnson doubts it will ever recover because there's already talk of stricter building codes with higher elevations that will be too expensive for most.

"We all fell apart and cried. Not materially what we lost, but the culture and lifestyle we had," said Johnson, who had worked repairing equipment at factories.

If there can be a bright side, it's that Johnson picked the right toys: "All the ones she asked about are the ones I got."

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