10-19-2019  11:34 pm   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Washington State to Vote on Affirmative Action Referendum

More than two decades after voters banned affirmative action, the question of whether one's minority status should be considered in state employment, contracting, colleges admissions is back on the ballot

Merkley Introduces Legislation that Protects Access to Health Care for Those Who Cannot Afford Bail

Under current law, individuals in custody who have not been convicted of a crime are denied Medicare, Medicaid, and veterans’ benefits

New County Hire Aims to Build Trust, Transparency Between Community and Public Safety Officials

Leneice Rice will serve as a liaison focused on documenting and reporting feedback from a community whose faith in law enforcement has been tested

Hank Willis Thomas Exhibit Opens at Portland Art Museum

One of the most important conceptual artists of our time, his works examine the representation of race and the politics of visual culture

NEWS BRIEFS

GFO Offers African Americans Help in Solving Family Mysteries

The Genealogical Forum of Oregon is holding an African American Special Interest Group Saturday, Oct. 19 ...

Third Annual NAMC-WA Gala Features Leader on Minority Business Development

The topic of the Washington Chapter of the National Association of Minority Contractors' event was 'Community and Collaboration' ...

Building Bridges Event Aims to Strengthen Trust Between Communities

The 4th Annual Building Bridges of Understanding in Our Communities: Confronting Hate will be held in Tigard on...

The Black Man Project Kicks Off National Tour in Seattle

The first in a series of interactive conversations focused on Black men and vulnerability takes place in Seattle on October 25 ...

Protesters Rally in Ashland to Demand 'Impeach Trump Now'

Activists are rallying in Ashland Sunday Oct, 13 to demand impeachment proceedings ...

Video shows coach disarming, embracing Oregon student

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Authorities have released a video that shows part of a former Oregon football star's successful effort to disarm a student who brought a shotgun to a Portland high school.The video released Friday by the Multnomah County District Attorney's Office shows Keanon Lowe and...

Parents guilty of starving 5-year-old daughter to death

BEND, Ore. (AP) — A jury has convicted a Redmond couple of starving their 5-year-old adopted daughter to death.The Bulletin reports by unanimous jury verdicts Friday after a weekslong trial, Sacora Horn-Garcia and Estevan Garcia were found guilty of murder by abuse and criminal...

Vaughn scores twice, Vandy upsets No. 22 Missouri 21-14

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Derek Mason wants it known he's the best coach for the Vanderbilt Commodores.Riley Neal came off the bench and threw a 21-yard touchdown to Cam Johnson with 8:57 left, and Vanderbilt upset No. 22 Missouri 21-14 on Saturday with a stifling defensive...

No. 22 Missouri heads to Vandy, 1st road trip since opener

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Missouri coach Barry Odom knows only too well the dangers of going on the road and how a few mistakes can prove very costly.While some of his players my not remember that stunning loss at Wyoming to open this season, Odom hasn't forgotten."We're going to treat it just...

OPINION

Atatiana Jefferson, Killed by Police Officer in Her Own Home

Atatiana Jefferson, a biology graduate who worked in the pharmaceutical industry and was contemplating becoming a doctor, lived a life of purpose that mattered ...

“Hell No!” That Is My Message to Those Who Would Divide Us 

Upon release from the South African jail, Nelson Mandela told UAW Local 600 members “It is you who have made the United States of America a superpower, a leader of the world" ...

Rep. Janelle Bynum Issues Response to the Latest Statement from Clackamas Town Center

State legislator questions official response after daughter questioned for ‘loitering’ in parking lot ...

Why Would HUD Gut Its Own Disparate Impact Rule?

"You can’t expand housing rights by limiting civil protections. The ’D’ in HUD doesn’t stand for ‘Discrimination’" ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

New Emmett Till marker dedicated to replace vandalized sign

GLENDORA, Miss. (AP) — A new bulletproof memorial to Emmett Till was dedicated Saturday in Mississippi after previous historical markers were repeatedly vandalized.The brutal slaying of the 14-year-old black teenager helped spur the civil rights movement more than 60 years ago.The...

Parents sue Virginia school district over racist 2017 video

HENRICO, Va. (AP) — The parents of a Virginia student who say their son was assaulted and bullied by his middle school football teammates in an incident captured on video two years ago are suing the school system.The video, which showed football players simulating sex acts on black students...

Team abandons FA Cup qualifier after racial abuse

LONDON (AP) — An FA Cup qualifier between Haringey Borough and Yeovil was abandoned Saturday when the home team walked off the field after one of its players was racially abused.Haringey, a London-based non-league club, walked off in the 64th minute after claims its Cameroonian goalkeeper...

ENTERTAINMENT

Adam Lambert: Happy to see more LGBTQ artists find success

NEW YORK (AP) — Adam Lambert, who rose on the music scene as the runner-up on "America Idol" in 2009, says he's happy to see more mainstream LGBTQ artists find major success."I think it's less taboo to be queer in the music industry now because there's so many cases you can point to like,...

Jane Fonda returns to civil disobedience for climate change

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inspired by the climate activism of a Swedish teenager, Jane Fonda says she's returning to civil disobedience nearly a half-century after she was last arrested at a protest.Fonda, known for her opposition to the Vietnam War, was one of 17 climate protesters arrested Friday...

Naomi Wolf and publisher part ways amid delay of new book

NEW YORK (AP) — Naomi Wolf and her U.S. publisher have split up amid a dispute over her latest book, "Outrages."Wolf and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt announced separately Friday that they had "mutually and amicably agreed to part company" and that Houghton would not be releasing "Outrages."...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Altuve's HR in 9th sends Astros to World Series over Yankees

HOUSTON (AP) — Jose Altuve, the 5-foot-6 driving force of Houston, delivered a swing that will play in...

Impeachment inquiry puts spotlight on Perry, who shunned it

WASHINGTON (AP) — Long after more flamboyant colleagues flamed out of President Donald Trump's favor amid...

Hong Kong activist stabbed as protesters gird for march

HONG KONG (AP) — A man distributing leaflets near a wall with pro-democracy messages was stabbed and...

The Latest: Syria Kurds say they will withdraw from border

BEIRUT (AP) — The Latest on Turkey's invasion of northern Syria (all times local):11:15 p.m.A senior Syrian...

South Sudan opposition leader returns to meet with president

JUBA, South Sudan (AP) — South Sudan opposition leader Riek Machar returned to the country Saturday to meet...

Ethiopia's Nobel-winning leader launches million-copy book

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia (AP) — Ethiopia's Nobel Peace Prize-winning prime minister is launching a book of his...

McMenamins
By Chris Levister Special to the NNPA from Blackvoicenews.com

The statistics are alarming. One out of every three young Black males in America today is in prison, in jail, on probation, or on parole. Eighty percent of those dropping out of high school today are boys of color. In California the graduation rate for young Black males is below 40 percent. The U.S. Education Department tells us these boys represent 80 percent of those nationwide who misbehave in the class. Sixty-nine percent of Black male dropouts are boys in fatherless homes.

Veteran LAPD officer Stinson Brown, Sr. knows something about the heart-breaking demise of America's young Black males. In July 2009 his only son, 21-year-old Stinson Ameer Brown, a solid Christian, good student, accomplished athlete and dedicated community servant was gunned down at a party in Baldwin Hills. Thus, his inspiration to create Brother II Brother, an organization dedicated to "eradicating generational curses and strongholds that prevent 'at risk' children from achieving their full potential."

Stinson, along with a host of community leaders and more than 70 mentors from Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. and Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc. teamed up with Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., to corral 200 Black boys ages 11 to 19-years-old for a full day of mentoring on the campus of UC Riverside.

Our mentors come from a myriad of socio-economic and professional backgrounds said Stinson. "We are physicians, attorneys, police officers, journalists, civil servants, construction workers, teachers, truck drivers, engineers, military veterans, sales professionals, and entrepreneurs. All are leaders. We all share the common desire to make this world – our communities, our neighborhoods – a better place for our children."

It was a powerful moment when Stinson and the elite professionals stood in a receiving line. Mentors placed a reassuring hand on each boy's shoulder committing to motivate, encourage, and give the support needed for a bigger and brighter future.

Young Danny Bennett's eyes lit up, like Christmas lights, full of hope, he nodded, eagerly.

"Many of these kids come from fatherless homes. Many have never been on a college campus. Most of them have never seen as many well-dressed accomplished men in one room," said Kenneth Simons, director of African Students Programs at UCR.

"You can see their faces light up. You can see the curiosity. Sadly behind some of those smiles," said co-chair Terry Boykins, "there is deep pain, loneliness, and anger. It's very powerful to witness this."

Fatherhood; incarceration; health and mental wellness; 'How to Treat a Lady"; "How to be Strong without Being Violent"; money management; effective speaking and faith-based involvement were repeated themes voiced by the panelists during a series of group workshops and break-out sessions.

Boykins admitted "the church must be more transparent" to meet the needs of youth today. He challenged 'Day of Mentoring' participants to "begin within your own community and work outward to enrich all."

"Think of us as surgeons in an operating room," said project director Kevin Hall. "The goal is to eradicate the disease that prevents our children from achieving. With the help of love, leadership and guidance, we get to know family history. We identify the wounds. We listen to aspirations, dreams and frustrations. We earn trust. We empower. Little by little we see the disease replaced by healthy physical and mental wellness."

Rialto High School teacher and U.S. Naval Academy graduate, Commander Sandy Jones said as in the case of one young participant, mentors are rarely surprised to see the deep pockets of distress cloaked in disguise.

"I had to pull this kid out of one of the sessions today because he was being disruptive," recalled Jones. "He was not receptive to any guidance I tried to give him.

His response disguised in humor and aggression, unmasked woundedness, disappointment, a sense of despair and hopelessness."

"He's had so much anger and hurt in his life – authority is meaningless to him because he's been let down so many times. When I hugged him and said – what's hurting you son, he dropped his eyes and said, 'How did you know that.' I said it helps to have 43 years of life in front of you. His eyes lit up. That's the power of what we do here," said Jones.

"I learned not to let obstacles get in your way," said Tyler Thomas, 14 of Culver City. "Also, we learned that we should not use any excuse to hold us from our dream."

"I wish I had a father. I would get him to help me with my homework and go to soccer games," said Jesse from Victorville.

Kishaun, from Pomona, said the workshops were helpful. "They let us talk about stuff you can't talk to your mother or sister about."

Malik Beamon says he learned what to do when he sees bullying at his Perris middle school. "I learned that it's important to take bullying seriously and not just brush it off as something that kids have to "tough out."

Jacoby O'Neal said he was surprised that almost all of the mentors had gone through the same struggles he and other the mentees are going through now when they were young men.

"With all of the problems they had during their childhood, they did not let any of those issues hold them back from reaching their goals," said O'Neal. "I learned - always have a positive male role model in your life that will always lead you the right way," said Darryl Turner, 13.

In support of the sorority's EMBODI (Empowering Males to Build Opportunities for Developing Independence), the Mu Chi Chapter is presenting young men grades 6-12 with a scholarship opportunity.

"We are excited to let young scholars express themselves through an oratorical contest. In today's society, many young men do not have ways to have their emotions and opinions be heard. Since writing is an essential part of college, we want to present young men with an opportunity in using writing as an outlet." For information visit www.muchideltas.org/embodi.php.

For Stinson Brown Brother II Brother can't fill the gaping hole left by his son's murder. Still he says the organization is a powerful tool for turning tragedy into hope and change.

PHOTO: Danny Bennett (left) and Jeremy Johnson were the among the 200 boys and teens at the Brother II Brother event held May 7, 2011 at UCR.  

mlkbreakfast2020 tickets 300x180

Pacific University Master in Fine Arts Writing
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

Chicken Waffles 2019