12-09-2019  6:52 pm   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Black Food Professionals See Opportunities to “Scale Up” in School Cafeterias and on Store Shelves

Two Portland women are addressing disparities in the local food scene with Ethiopian and Haitian flavors, ingredients

Portland Fire Chief Sara Boone Climbing Historic Ladders

In 1995, Boone was the first African American woman hired by Portland Fire & Rescue; this year she became its first African American Chief

Christmas Tree Shopping is Harder Than Ever, Thanks to Climate Change and Demographics

For Christmas tree farms to survive, shoppers will need to be more flexible

November Holiday Travel at PDX Brings More Comfort, Convenience and Furry Friends

If you’ve not been to Portland International Airport in a few months, you’re in for some surprises.

NEWS BRIEFS

EPA Approves Funding for Oregon and Washington to Improve Drinking Water, Wastewater Infrastructure

States estimate $190 million for wastewater, $35 million for drinking water projects in Oregon, and $120 million for...

Conservation Breakthrough for Endangered Butterfly

The Oregon Zoo's breeding success provides new hope in an effort to save Oregon silverspots ...

Meet 80 Local Authors at OHS 52nd Holiday Cheer Book Sale and Signing

This free Oregon Historical Society event will be held this Sunday, December 8 from 12 p.m. – 4 p.m. ...

Need for Blood Doesn’t Stop for Holidays – Donors Needed

Those who come to give through Dec. 18 will receive a Amazon.com Gift Card ...

North Carolina Court Decision Upholds Removal of Confederate Monument

Lawyers argued that the monument was installed at the end of Reconstruction to further the false “Lost Cause” narrative,...

Person dies when travel trailer catches fire, explodes

ALFALFA, Ore. (AP) — One person died when a travel trailer caught fire and exploded east of Bend, authorities said.KTVZ-TV reports Crook County deputies were sent shortly after 9 a.m. Sunday for a welfare check on someone living in the trailer near Alfalfa, according to Sheriff John...

Portland police release names in officer shooting of man

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Police have released the name of the officer who shot and killed a man Sunday afternoon outside a coffee shop on Portland's southeast side. The Portland Police Bureau said Monday that Officer Justin Raphael shot the man while Officer Daniel Leonard used less lethal...

LSU's Burrow, Auburn's Brown named AP SEC players of year

LSU quarterback Joe Burrow is a unanimous selection as the offensive player of the year on The Associated Press All-Southeastern Conference football team.The top-ranked Tigers also have the SEC’s coach of the year in Ed Orgeron and the newcomer of the year in freshman cornerback Derek...

AP Source: Mizzou hiring Appalachian State's Eli Drinkwitz

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri reached an agreement Sunday with Eliah Drinkwitz to take over the Tigers' once-proud football program, a person with knowledge of the hiring told The Associated Press, making Appalachian State's successful coach the second-youngest in a Power Five...

OPINION

Will You Answer the Call for Moral Revival?

In embracing and expanding the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Revs. Barber and Theoharis have asked Presidential candidates to consider a debate that focuses exclusively on poverty ...

What I’m Thankful For This Season

Ray Curry gives thanks for a human right that shaped our country throughout the 20th century and that made Thanksgiving possible for so many Americans who, like him, didn’t get here by way of the Mayflower ...

Congressional Black Caucus Members Visit U.S.-Mexico Border: “Mistreatment of Black Immigrants is Another ‘Stain on America’”

Members said they witnessed first-hand the deplorable treatment and plight of Black immigrants ...

Portland, I'm Ready

Last month I had the privilege to stand with hundreds of supporters and announce my intention to run for re-election ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Jury selection starts for trial in college student's killing

UPPER MARLBORO, Md. (AP) — Jury selection began Monday for the trial of a white man charged with a hate crime in the fatal stabbing of a black college student on the University of Maryland’s campus.Jurors are expected to hear opening statements for Sean Urbanski’s trial later...

Nevada third to vote, still up for grabs for 2020 Democrats

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Nevada won its coveted early date in the presidential primary because it was supposed to offer Democrats something different.It’s more racially diverse than the two states that weigh in earlier, Iowa and New Hampshire. Its population is young, working class, largely...

Black church believed to be oldest in US finishes repairs

SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP) — A 160-year-old church believed to be the oldest black church in the United States and built by enslaved Africans has been restored to a version of its former glory.A fresh coat of paint covers the freshly carpeted First African Baptist Church in Savannah, Georgia, which...

ENTERTAINMENT

‘Benson,’ ‘Star Trek’ actor René Auberjonois has died at 79

LOS ANGELES (AP) — René Auberjonois, a prolific actor best known for his roles on the television shows “Benson” and “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine” and his part in the 1970 film “M.A.S.H.” playing Father Mulcahy, has died. He was 79. The actor died...

Broadcast TV shut out of Globe nods, Netflix edges HBO

NEW YORK (AP) — The Golden Globe TV nominations were most striking not for what they included, but what they didn't: The traditional broadcast networks were completely shut out in all 55 nominations.It was a crowning moment for Netflix, and not just for the jeweled one on Queen Elizabeth's...

Golden snubs and surprises, including little 'Cats' love

NEW YORK (AP) — Some Golden Globe nominations seemed like locks: Joaquin Phoenix, Tom Hanks, Adam Driver and Eddie Murphy. But others were shocks, like Lupita Nyong'o not getting a nomination for “Us.” Other notable snubs and surprises:MEN ONLYOnly men made the best director...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Strasburg, Nationals reach record 5M, 7-year deal

SAN DIEGO (AP) — Stephen Strasburg returned to the Washington Nationals with a record contract on the first...

George Laurer, inventor of ubiquitous UPC, dies at 94

WENDELL, N.C. (AP) — George J. Laurer, whose invention of the Universal Product Code at IBM transformed...

Broadcast TV shut out of Globe nods, Netflix edges HBO

NEW YORK (AP) — The Golden Globe TV nominations were most striking not for what they included, but what...

China claims everyone in Xinjiang camps has 'graduated'

BEIJING (AP) — People who were at vocational training centers in China's far west Xinjiang have all...

Michelle Obama promotes girls education in Vietnam school

LONG AN, Vietnam (AP) — Former U.S. first lady Michelle Obama spoke to students at a school in southern...

Intl journalist group: fewer media staff killed this year

BRUSSELS (AP) — Deaths among journalists killed in the line of duty are lower this year, but a journalism...

McMenamins
By Chris Levister Special to the NNPA from Blackvoicenews.com

The statistics are alarming. One out of every three young Black males in America today is in prison, in jail, on probation, or on parole. Eighty percent of those dropping out of high school today are boys of color. In California the graduation rate for young Black males is below 40 percent. The U.S. Education Department tells us these boys represent 80 percent of those nationwide who misbehave in the class. Sixty-nine percent of Black male dropouts are boys in fatherless homes.

Veteran LAPD officer Stinson Brown, Sr. knows something about the heart-breaking demise of America's young Black males. In July 2009 his only son, 21-year-old Stinson Ameer Brown, a solid Christian, good student, accomplished athlete and dedicated community servant was gunned down at a party in Baldwin Hills. Thus, his inspiration to create Brother II Brother, an organization dedicated to "eradicating generational curses and strongholds that prevent 'at risk' children from achieving their full potential."

Stinson, along with a host of community leaders and more than 70 mentors from Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. and Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc. teamed up with Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., to corral 200 Black boys ages 11 to 19-years-old for a full day of mentoring on the campus of UC Riverside.

Our mentors come from a myriad of socio-economic and professional backgrounds said Stinson. "We are physicians, attorneys, police officers, journalists, civil servants, construction workers, teachers, truck drivers, engineers, military veterans, sales professionals, and entrepreneurs. All are leaders. We all share the common desire to make this world – our communities, our neighborhoods – a better place for our children."

It was a powerful moment when Stinson and the elite professionals stood in a receiving line. Mentors placed a reassuring hand on each boy's shoulder committing to motivate, encourage, and give the support needed for a bigger and brighter future.

Young Danny Bennett's eyes lit up, like Christmas lights, full of hope, he nodded, eagerly.

"Many of these kids come from fatherless homes. Many have never been on a college campus. Most of them have never seen as many well-dressed accomplished men in one room," said Kenneth Simons, director of African Students Programs at UCR.

"You can see their faces light up. You can see the curiosity. Sadly behind some of those smiles," said co-chair Terry Boykins, "there is deep pain, loneliness, and anger. It's very powerful to witness this."

Fatherhood; incarceration; health and mental wellness; 'How to Treat a Lady"; "How to be Strong without Being Violent"; money management; effective speaking and faith-based involvement were repeated themes voiced by the panelists during a series of group workshops and break-out sessions.

Boykins admitted "the church must be more transparent" to meet the needs of youth today. He challenged 'Day of Mentoring' participants to "begin within your own community and work outward to enrich all."

"Think of us as surgeons in an operating room," said project director Kevin Hall. "The goal is to eradicate the disease that prevents our children from achieving. With the help of love, leadership and guidance, we get to know family history. We identify the wounds. We listen to aspirations, dreams and frustrations. We earn trust. We empower. Little by little we see the disease replaced by healthy physical and mental wellness."

Rialto High School teacher and U.S. Naval Academy graduate, Commander Sandy Jones said as in the case of one young participant, mentors are rarely surprised to see the deep pockets of distress cloaked in disguise.

"I had to pull this kid out of one of the sessions today because he was being disruptive," recalled Jones. "He was not receptive to any guidance I tried to give him.

His response disguised in humor and aggression, unmasked woundedness, disappointment, a sense of despair and hopelessness."

"He's had so much anger and hurt in his life – authority is meaningless to him because he's been let down so many times. When I hugged him and said – what's hurting you son, he dropped his eyes and said, 'How did you know that.' I said it helps to have 43 years of life in front of you. His eyes lit up. That's the power of what we do here," said Jones.

"I learned not to let obstacles get in your way," said Tyler Thomas, 14 of Culver City. "Also, we learned that we should not use any excuse to hold us from our dream."

"I wish I had a father. I would get him to help me with my homework and go to soccer games," said Jesse from Victorville.

Kishaun, from Pomona, said the workshops were helpful. "They let us talk about stuff you can't talk to your mother or sister about."

Malik Beamon says he learned what to do when he sees bullying at his Perris middle school. "I learned that it's important to take bullying seriously and not just brush it off as something that kids have to "tough out."

Jacoby O'Neal said he was surprised that almost all of the mentors had gone through the same struggles he and other the mentees are going through now when they were young men.

"With all of the problems they had during their childhood, they did not let any of those issues hold them back from reaching their goals," said O'Neal. "I learned - always have a positive male role model in your life that will always lead you the right way," said Darryl Turner, 13.

In support of the sorority's EMBODI (Empowering Males to Build Opportunities for Developing Independence), the Mu Chi Chapter is presenting young men grades 6-12 with a scholarship opportunity.

"We are excited to let young scholars express themselves through an oratorical contest. In today's society, many young men do not have ways to have their emotions and opinions be heard. Since writing is an essential part of college, we want to present young men with an opportunity in using writing as an outlet." For information visit www.muchideltas.org/embodi.php.

For Stinson Brown Brother II Brother can't fill the gaping hole left by his son's murder. Still he says the organization is a powerful tool for turning tragedy into hope and change.

PHOTO: Danny Bennett (left) and Jeremy Johnson were the among the 200 boys and teens at the Brother II Brother event held May 7, 2011 at UCR.  

mlkbreakfast2020 tickets 300x180

Martha Redbone Trio
Oregon Lottery Scoreboard app download
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

Crown Royal Boss Play the Game