06-06-2020  11:48 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Thousands March Peacefully for 7th Night in Portland

NBA Portland Trail Blazer star Damian Lillard walked at the front of the crowd arm-in-arm with young demonstrators

Districts Jettison School Police Officers Amid Protests

Mayor Ted Wheeler: “Leaders must listen and respond to community. We must disrupt the patterns of racism and injustice.”

Two De La Salle North Grads Forge Thrilling Paths

A med student and a Fulbright scholar reflect on their time at the school.

OHSU Resident Uses TikTok, Student Outreach, to Show Representation in Medicine

A group of high school students weighing careers in health care were recently greeted on Google Meet by a physician whose social media star is on the rise.

NEWS BRIEFS

Resources for Supporting Racial Justice in Oregon

Learn about how to get involved with local organizations that have been fighting for decades for racial justice. ...

Business Donates Profits

On Sunday, June 7, the owners of Pine State Biscuits are donating all of their profits to the NAACP and ACLU from all five of their...

NAMC-Oregon Statement on Racism, Inequity & Violence Against Black People

All of us at NAMC-Oregon are angered and deeply saddened by the police murder of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and the...

Civil Rights and Social Justice Organizations Call for a National Day of Mourning Today

At 12:45 p.m. PT today, the NAACP is asking for everyone to take a moment of silence for 8 minutes and 46 seconds. ...

ACLU Files Class Action Lawsuit Against Minneapolis Police for Attacking Journalists at Protests

The lawsuit’s lead plaintiff, Jared Goyette, a journalist covering the demonstrations, was shot in the face with a rubber bullet ...

The Latest: Statue of Gen. Wickham toppled in Richmond

TOP OF THE HOUR:— Statue of Confederate Gen. Wickham toppled in Richmond, Virginia— Police use flash bang devices, pepper spray to disperse Seattle protesters— Mayor of Portland, Oregon, orders police not to use CS gas except as last resort___RICHMOND, Va. — In the...

Oregon city joins others in curbing tear gas, police tactics

SEATTLE (AP) — Portland, Oregon, Mayor Ted Wheeler on Saturday ordered the city’s police to stop using a common type of tear gas except as a last resort in life-threatening situations, making it one of several cities that have started restricting law enforcement tactics in response to...

Kansas, Missouri renew Border War with 4-game football set

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Kansas and Missouri are resuming their bitter Border War in football after the former Big 12 rivals agreed to a four-game series in which each school will play two home games beginning in September 2025.The fourth-longest rivalry in college football dates to 1891, but...

OPINION

Responding to Challenging Questions in a Nation Still in Upheaval

Nate McCoy attempts to answer tough questions in a letter to his sons ...

Mayor Ted Wheeler: Portland and the Path Forward

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler invites Portlanders, as public servants, to join him "in insisting that we never return to business as usual." ...

Local Business Leaders Share Messages of Hope

President, CEO of SAIF says each of us must move forward in "our understanding of the problem, in holding ourselves accountable for our own attitudes and biases, and in coming together, not apart." ...

Time to Stop Messing Around and Strike at the Root of Police Violence

Thomas Knapp says the root of police violence is the creation of "police forces" as state institutions separate from the populace and dedicated to suppressing that populace on command ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Protesters topple Confederate statue in Virginia capital

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — A small group of demonstrators toppled a statue of a Confederate general in the the former capital of the Confederacy late Saturday, following a day of largely peaceful protests in the Virginia city.The statue of Gen. Williams Carter Wickham was pulled from its pedestal...

Asia Today: South Korea's cases surpass 50 for 2nd day

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea on Sunday reported 57 additional cases of the coronavirus, marking a second day in a row that its daily jump is above 50 as authorities struggle to suppress a spike in infections in the densely populated Seoul area.The new cases took the country’s...

Washington protesters express optimism after week on edge

WASHINGTON (AP) — On Monday, they were forcibly removed from the street by law enforcement. On Saturday, they danced. The tens of thousands of racially diverse demonstrators who flooded Washington to protest injustice and police brutality reshaped the mood of a city that has been on edge...

ENTERTAINMENT

Kanye West attends Chicago protest, donates [scripts/homepage/home.php]M to victims

Kanye West has donated [scripts/homepage/home.php] million to support the families and legal teams for George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor.A representative for the rapper confirmed that some of the money donated would fully cover college tuition costs for Floyd’s 6-year-old daughter, Gianna. Floyd died...

Shouts of solidarity for black reporter pulled from protests

A black reporter from the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette was told she could not cover the city’s protests over the death of George Floyd because of a tweet, and now dozens of her colleagues, fellow journalists, her union and even the city’s mayor are speaking out in support of her. On Friday...

AP Photos: Ahead of Tom Jones' 80th birthday, a look back

For nearly 60 years, Tom Jones has been delighting audiences with stunning stage performances and hits like “It's Not Unusual” and “Delilah.”The Welsh baritone who drew comparisons to Elvis turns 80 on Sunday. This gallery of images shot by The Associated Press shows...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

AP PHOTOS: Massive protests punctuate a week in the streets

They held up signs and their fists and the memory of George Floyd.Tens of thousands of protesters marched...

Coronavirus disrupts global fight to save endangered species

WASHINGTON (AP) — Biologist Carlos Ruiz has spent a quarter-century working to save golden lion tamarins,...

As Trump blames antifa, protest records show scant evidence

WASHINGTON (AP) — Scott Nichols, a balloon artist, was riding home on his scooter from the protests...

UK's rapid-fire changes on face coverings advice criticized

LONDON (AP) — The British government faced criticism Saturday for another sudden change in its advice on...

The Latest: China has 1st non-imported infection in 2 weeks

BEIJING — China has reported its first non-imported case of the new coronavirus in two weeks, an infected...

Brazil govt yanks virus death toll as data befuddles experts

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazil's government has stopped publishing a running total of coronavirus deaths and...

McMenamins
By The Skanner News

EL PASO, Texas (AP) -- In search of Hispanic votes and a long-shot immigration overhaul, President Barack Obama on Tuesday stood at the U.S.-Mexico border for the first time since winning the White House and declared it more secure than ever. He mocked Republican lawmakers for blocking immigration over border security alone, saying they won't be happy until they get a moat with alligators along the border.

"They'll never be satisfied," he said.

Stymied by both chambers of Congress, the president ditched lawmakers in favor of voters who might pressure them, making an appeal to the public on a hot and dusty day far outside the beltway. He told a friendly El Paso, Texas, crowd that it's up to them to tell Congress to pass legislation providing a pathway to citizenship for 11 million illegal immigrants.

The approach also allowed the president to make clear that it's Republicans - not him - standing in the way of immigration legislation. As his re-election campaign approaches it's a message he wants broadcast loud and clear to Latino voters who don't like his administration's heavy deportations and feel he never made good on his promise to prioritize immigration legislation during his first year in office.

"I am asking you to add your voices to this," Obama said in El Paso. "We need Washington to know that there is a movement for reform gathering strength from coast to coast. That's how we'll get this done."

Countering Republican calls to focus on border security before moving to a comprehensive overhaul, Obama boasted of increasing border patrol agents, nearing completion of a border fence, and screening more cargo, among other steps.

"We have gone above and beyond what was requested by the very Republicans who said they supported broader reform as long as we got serious about enforcement," Obama said. "But even though we've answered these concerns, I gotta say I suspect there are still going to be some who are trying to move the goal posts on us one more time."

"Maybe they'll need a moat," he said derisively to laughter from the crowd. "Maybe they'll want alligators in the moat."

"The question is whether those in Congress who previously walked away in the name of enforcement are now ready to come back to the table and finish the work we've started," he said.

Obama also tailored his argument to the times, making his case for immigration reform in newly sharpened economic terms. He said that the middle class would benefit from bringing illegal immigrants out of an underground economy and drawing on the abilities of immigrants educated in American universities. Obama also noted that it's not just Latinos who want an immigration remake, but also police chiefs, business owners, educators and others.

His speech broke no new policy ground, though, and he declined to offer a bill or call on Congress to send him one by a particular deadline - a bow to political realities on Capitol Hill. Republicans who control the House are hostile to overhaul legislation.

And as if to underscore how faintly his call for immigration reform would resonate in Congress, two key border state Republicans immediately shot back with a statement demanding to know: "President Obama speaks about our broken immigration system; but what about our broken borders?" The statement was from Republican Sens. Jon Kyl and John McCain of Arizona, the latter Obama's 2008 presidential opponent and a one-time supporter of comprehensive overhaul legislation.

Obama's personal pitch was the latest step in a visible campaign to build support and pressure on Republicans to act. He went so far as to encourage people to sign up to help him at the White House website. He said it was up to the American people to drive the debate and isolate areas where both parties can agree.

Politically, Obama sought to have it both ways.

He said he would lead a "constructive and civil debate" on the issue but publicly questioned the motives of Republicans and their ability to keep their word.

And it remained unclear how mocking Republican calls for border security would get Obama any closer to his goal of bipartisan legislation.

Just across the Rio Grande from the Chamizal National Park, where Obama spoke Tuesday, the Ciudad Juarez park that shares the same name has been used by criminals to dump the bodies of rivals. A nearby entertainment district, within sight of a major bridge into the United States, has been the scene of numerous shootouts among rival cartels and authorities.

The president made his pitch in a state he lost by more than 10 percentage points in 2008 and is unlikely to pick up in 2012. But Hispanic voters are critical to the president's re-election. Latinos accounted for more than 7 percent of voters in the 2008 presidential election, according to the Pew Hispanic Center, and their numbers are greater in certain swing states like Nevada, New Mexico, Colorado and Florida.

The trip had a more overtly political component, too: From El Paso the president headed to the relatively liberal bastion of Austin to raise money for the Democratic National Committee at two events Tuesday night.

The president wasn't able to get immigration legislation through Congress last year that would have provided a route to legal status for college students and others who were brought to the country as children. The so-called DREAM Act passed the House, then controlled by Democrats, but was blocked by Senate Republicans.

The Senate is now even more heavily Republican, and Republicans control the House. That means immigration reform can't happen unless they cooperate. Nonetheless, Senate Democrats plan to reintroduce the DREAM Act on Wednesday, with their counterparts in the House following suit. Given Republican opposition the bills likely won't get far, but Obama will try to make certain voters know who to blame.

 

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