11-14-2019  8:45 pm   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Veterans and Consumers Fair Credit Act Introduced

In honor of Veterans Day, Monday, Merkley, Brown, Reed, Van Hollen introduced legislation to extend financial protections for servicemembers to veterans and consumers

Home Base Keeps More Than 400 Families in Their Homes in Seattle

The United Way of King County program aims to reduce homelessness by preventing evictions

Jefferson High Sees Gains in Freshman Preparedness, Graduation Rates

New support positions aim to increase attendance rates among students who often struggle with displacement, homelessness

Nike Cuts Ties With Amazon, but Shoes Won’t Vanish From Site

Nike wants to focus on selling its swoosh-branded gear on its own site and apps

NEWS BRIEFS

Noose Found at Oregon Health & Science University

Surveillance cameras did not capture the area; investigator are reviewing who had access ...

DEQ Extends Air Quality Advisory Due to Stagnation

DEQ expects the air quality advisory to last until at least Tuesday, Nov. 12 ...

Forest Service Waives Fees in Honor of Veterans Day

The USDA Forest Service will waive fees at day-use recreation sites in Oregon and Washington on Monday, Nov. 11 in honor of Veterans...

Two Local Nonprofits Announced as Grant Recipients for Portland-Area Programs

Financial Beginnings Oregon and Portland Parks Foundation will receive a total of 0,000 plus leadership resources through Bank of...

State Seeks Volunteers to Rank Investments in Washington’s Outdoors

The Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office is recruiting 50 volunteers to evaluate grant proposals for parks, boating...

Court blocks flavored THC oil vape ban

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Both parts of Gov. Kate Brown’s ban on flavored vape products are now on hold, with the Court of Appeals putting a stay on flavored cannabis vape products.The Oregonian/OregonLive reports the Court of Appeals action Thursday came in response to a suit by the...

Oregon’s chief justice bars ICE from courthouse arrests

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Seeking to halt federal agents from arresting people in courthouses for immigration violations, Oregon’s Supreme Court chief justice on Thursday prohibited civil arrests in state courthouses unless the arresting agency has a judicial arrest warrant.This sets up a...

No. 11 UF heads to struggling Mizzou with SEC hopes alive

No. 11 Florida (8-2, 5-2 SEC, No. 11 CFP) at Missouri (5-4, 2-3), Saturday at 12 p.m. EST (CBS).Line: Florida by 7.Series record: Missouri leads 5-3.WHAT'S AT STAKE?Florida trails Georgia by a half-game in the SEC East and the Bulldogs hold the tiebreaker. So, the Gators need to beat the Tigers...

No. 5 Georgia visits No. 13 Auburn to highlight SEC slate

Here are some things to watch during the 12th week of the Southeastern Conference football season.GAME OF THE WEEKNo. 5 Georgia (8-1, 5-1 SEC, No. 4 College Football Playoff) at No. 13 Auburn (7-2, 4-2, No. 12 CFP): Georgia probably must win this game to keep its playoff hopes alive. The Bulldogs...

OPINION

Illinois Prison Bans Black History Books

Officials claim the works are ‘racial’ ...

5 Ways Life Would be Better if it Were Always Daylight Saving Time

A Professor from the University of Washington says DST saves lives and energy and prevents crime ...

Importance of Educators of Color for Black and Brown Students

A new report examines the ways that school leaders of color’s experiences and perspectives influence how they build school culture ...

Atatiana Jefferson, Killed by Police Officer in Her Own Home

Atatiana Jefferson, a biology graduate who worked in the pharmaceutical industry and was contemplating becoming a doctor, lived a life of purpose that mattered ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

3 in melee with white supremacists plead to lesser charges

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Three protesters entered no-contest pleas Thursday to lesser charges stemming from a 2016 melee with white supremacists that injured at least 14 people at the California state Capitol.They include prominent San Francisco Bay Area anti-fascist leader Yvonne Felarca....

Ex-Gov. Deval Patrick launches ‘Hail Mary’ bid for president

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — Deval Patrick launched what he acknowledged to be a “Hail Mary” bid on Thursday for the Democratic presidential nomination, testing whether voters sifting through an already crowded field are open to hearing from new candidates less than three months before...

Mo’Nique sues Netflix for discrimination in show offer

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Mo’Nique sued Netflix on Thursday for race and sex discrimination in its offer for a proposed comedy special, accusing the streaming service of giving her a lowball offer that was part of a larger company tendency to underpay black women.The comedian and...

ENTERTAINMENT

The barrier-breaking ‘Atlantics’ heralds Mati Diop’s arrival

NEW YORK (AP) — Mati Diop has always lived in Paris but as a French-Senegalese woman whose family is from Dakar, she’s long been acutely conscious of another, unlived existence for herself in Africa. And it’s there that her life as a filmmaker has largely resided.Diop spent...

Review: An evolved iceman? Kristoff steps up in ‘Frozen 2’

Picture this: A princess is in distress. It looks bad. Her dashing young man rides up in the nick of time and says, “Here I am to save you, my dear!” Actually, he doesn’t. He just says, “I'm here. Whaddya need?” She has a plan, and off they go.This little exchange...

Alejandro Sanz, Rosalía, Residente win Latin Grammys

The 2019 Latin Grammys kicked off its 20th anniversary with a festive performance highlighting various sounds from the genre as 20 artists, from Prince Royce to Anitta, united onstage to honor Latin music.Fito Páez, Reik, Natalia Jiménez, Beto Cuevas and Calibre 50 were among the acts who...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Swift says AMAs performance in jeopardy over music dispute

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Taylor Swift said Thursday that she may not perform at the American Music Awards and may...

Tents, stench, smoke: Health risks are gripping migrant camp

MATAMOROS, Mexico (AP) — A smoke-filled stench fills a refugee camp just a short walk from the U.S.-Mexico...

As Gaza truce begins, Israel could face questions on tactics

GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) — Residents say the airstrike came without warning: With fighting raging between...

Chileans blinded by police firing pellet guns in protests

SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — Chileans are accustomed to seeing violent clashes between police and demonstrators...

EU takes legal action against UK over commissioner dispute

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union is piling pressure on Britain and has launched legal action against the...

AP Interview: Evo Morales wants UN mediation in Bolivia

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Bolivia’s Evo Morales on Friday called for the United Nations, and possibly Pope...

McMenamins
Adrian Sainz and Matt Sedensky the Associated Press

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) -- The Mississippi River rose Monday to levels not seen in Memphis since the 1930s, swamping homes in low-lying neighborhoods and driving hundreds of people from their homes. But officials were confident the levees would protect the city's world-famous musical landmarks, including Graceland and Beale Street, and that no new areas would see any serious flooding.

As residents in the Home of the Blues waited for the river to crest as early as Monday night at a projected mark just inches short of the record set in 1937, officials downstream in Louisiana began evacuating prisoners from the state's toughest penitentiary and opened floodgates to relieve pressure on levees outside of New Orleans.

In Memphis, authorities have gone door-to-door to 1,300 homes over the past few days to warn people to clear out, but they were starting to talk about a labor-intensive clean up Monday afternoon, signaling the worst was likely over.

"Where the water is today, is where the water is going to be," Cory Williams, chief of geotechnical engineering for the Army Corps of Engineers in Memphis, told The Associated Press.

Exactly how many people heeded the warnings was not immediately clear, but more than 300 people were staying in shelters, and police stepped up patrols in evacuated areas to prevent looting.

Aurelio Flores, 36, his pregnant wife and their three children were among 175 people staying in a gymnasium at the Hope Presbyterian Church in Shelby County. His mobile home had about 4 feet of water when he last visited the trailer park on Wednesday.

"I imagine that my trailer, if it's not covered, it's close," said Flores, an unemployed construction worker. "If I think about it too much, and get angry about it, it will mean the end of me."

Sun Studio, where Elvis Presley made some of the recordings that helped him become king of rock `n' roll, was not in harm's way. Nor was Stax Records, which launched the careers of Otis Redding and the Staple Singers. Sun Studio still does some recording, while Stax is now a museum.

Graceland, Presley's former estate several miles south of downtown, was in no danger either.

"I want to say this: Graceland is safe. And we would charge hell with a water pistol to keep it that way and I'd be willing to lead the charge," said Bob Nations Jr., director of the Shelby County Emergency Management Agency.

The main Memphis airport was not threatened, nor was FedEx, which has a sorting hub at the airport that handles up to 2 million packages per day.

An NBA playoff game Monday night featuring the Memphis Grizzlies at the FedEx Forum downtown was not affected, and a barbecue contest this weekend was moved to higher ground.

"The country thinks were in lifeboats and we are underwater. For visitors, its business as usual," said Kevin Kane, president and chief executive of the Memphis Convention and Visitors Bureau.

Sandbags were put up in front of the 32-story tall Pyramid Arena, which was once used for college and pro basketball but is now being turned into a fishing and sporting goods store.

Forecasters said it appeared that the river was starting to level out and could crest as soon as Monday night at or near 48 feet, just shy of the all-time high of 48.7 feet. Forecasters had previously predicted the crest would come as late as Wednesday.

The Army Corps of Engineers said homes in most danger of flooding are in places not protected by levees or floodwalls, including areas near Nonconnah Creek and the Wolf and Loosahatchie rivers. About 150 Corps workers were walking along levees and monitoring the performance of pumping stations.

Levees in the Memphis area are 58 feet high on average, and the floodwalls downtown are 54 feet.

"We still have significant room before we even consider overtopping," Elizabeth Burks, deputy levee commander for the Memphis sector of the Corps.

At Beale Street, the thoroughfare known for blues music, people gawked and snapped photos as water pooled at the end of the street. Beale Street's world-famous nightspots are on higher ground.

At Sun Studio, where Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and a multitude of others also recorded, tourists from around the world continued to stream off buses and pose beneath the giant guitar hanging outside.

"We didn't really know what to expect," said Andy Reilly, a 32-year-old musician from Dublin, Ireland, who was in town to perform. "We're delighted it's not as bad as we thought it was going to be."

Because of heavy rain over the past few weeks and snowmelt along the upper reaches of the Mississippi, the river has broken high-water records upstream and inundated low-lying towns and farmland. The water on the Mississippi is so high that the rivers and creeks that feed into it are backed up, and that has accounted for some of the worst of the flooding so far.

Because of the levees and other defenses built since the cataclysmic Great Flood of 1927 that killed hundreds of people, engineers say it is unlikely any major metropolitan areas will be inundated as the high water pushes downstream over the next week or so. Nonetheless, they are cautious because of the risk of levee failures, as shown during Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

In Louisiana, the Corps partially opened a spillway that diverts the Mississippi into a lake to ease pressure on the levees in greater New Orleans. As workers used cranes to remove some of the Bonnet Carre Spillway's wooden barriers, hundreds of people watched from the riverbank.

The spillway, which the Corps built about 30 miles upriver from New Orleans in response to the flood of 1927, was last opened in 2008. Monday marked the 10th time it has been opened since the structure was completed in 1931.

Rufus Harris Jr., 87, said his family moved to New Orleans in 1927 only months after the disaster. He was too young to remember those days, but the stories he heard gave him respect for the river.

"People have a right to be concerned in this area because there's always a possibility of a levee having a defective spot," Harris said as he watched water rush out.

The Corps has also asked for permission to open a spillway north of Baton Rouge for the first time since 1973. Officials warned residents that even if it is opened, they can expect water 5 to 25 feet deep over parts of seven parishes. Some of Louisiana's most valuable farmland is expected to be inundated.

At the Louisiana State Penitentiary in Angola, home of the state's death row, officials started moving prisoners with medical problems to another prison as backwaters began to rise. The prisoners were moved in buses and vans under police escort.

The prison holds more 5,000 inmates and is bordered on three sides by the Mississippi. The prison has not flooded since 1927, though prisoners have been evacuated from time to time when high water threatened, most recently in 1997.

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Associated Press writers Michael Kunzelman in Norco, La.; Mary Foster in Angola, La.; Jim Salter in St. Louis and Chuck Bartels in Little Rock contributed to this report.

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