12-03-2020  5:31 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
MLK Breakfast 2021 Save the Date
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Black Mental Health Oregon Offers Free Computers, Internet Access

Organization wants to help elderly and those with mental illness stay connected

Black Restaurant Owners Keep Doors Open, Often at Great Loss

Blumenauer’s RESTAURANT Act could prove a lifeline -- if it makes it through Senate 

Merkley, Clay Propose Constitutional Amendment to Close Slavery Loophole in 13th Amendment

Indisputably racist exception permitting slavery as punishment for crime has fueled systemic racism in criminal justice for 150 years

Police Guide That Calls BLM a Terrorist Group Draws Outrage

The document contains misinformation and inflammatory rhetoric that could incite officers against protesters and people of color, critics said

NEWS BRIEFS

Commissioner Fritz Directs Portland Parks & Rec to Remove the Name 'Custer Park'

The park at SW 21st Avenue and Capitol Hill Road will temporarily be known as “A Park” as PP&R engages with the community to...

Oregonians May Qualify for Help Paying for Health Insurance

The deadline to apply for coverage is Tuesday, December 15. ...

Additional Food Benefits To Be Distributed in December

The Oregon Department of Human Service will issue emergency supplemental allotments to Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program...

Multnomah County Opens Applications for Restaurant and Food Cart COVID-19 Relief Grants

Caterers, B&Bs and benevolent groups can also apply; application deadline is Tuesday, Dec. 15 ...

OHS Shares Update on Afro-American Heritage Bicentennial Commemorative Quilt Conservation Efforts

The historical quilt was damaged during a vandalism incident at the Oregon Historical Society’s downtown facility last month ...

Fatal shooting of Black teen roils liberal town in Oregon

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The killing of a young Black man last month by a white man who complained that he was playing loud music has roiled Ashland, Oregon, forcing the liberal college town that is famous for its Shakespeare festival to take a hard look at race relations.The death of Aidan...

18th person with virus in Oregon Corrections custody dies

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — A man who tested positive for the coronavirus while incarcerated at the Oregon State Correctional Institution in Salem has died, state officials said. The state Department of Corrections said in a news release Thursday that the man described only as between 80 and 90 years...

Missouri takes on ex-coach Odom, Arkansas in rivalry game

Missouri quarterback Conor Bazelak should have a pretty good idea how to dissect the Arkansas defense on Saturday.His old coach is the one running it.Barry Odom didn't wander far after he was fired by as the head coach of the Tigers late last year, accepting a job as the defensive coordinator under...

Vanderbilt women's soccer player receives SEC football honor

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The Southeastern Conference has named Vanderbilt kicker Sarah Fuller as the league's co-special teams player of the week after she made history becoming the first woman to play in a Power 5 conference football game. Fuller shared the award Monday with Florida punt...

OPINION

All Eyes on Georgia

Senate control is crucial for the nation ...

Thanksgiving 2020: Grateful for New Hope and New Direction in Our Nation

This hasn’t been a normal year, and it isn’t going to be a normal Thanksgiving. ...

No Time to Rest

After four years under a Trump administration, we see there is a lot of work to be done. ...

Could America Learn a COVID-19 Lesson from Rwanda?

As of October 28, in a country of just over twelve million people, they have experienced only 35 deaths from the coronavirus ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Fatal shooting of Black teen roils liberal town in Oregon

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The killing of a young Black man last month by a white man who complained that he was playing loud music has roiled Ashland, Oregon, forcing the liberal college town that is famous for its Shakespeare festival to take a hard look at race relations.The death of Aidan...

Suit: Tennessee makes it too hard to restore voting rights

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee's path for those convicted of a felony to restore their right to vote has not only silenced Black voters but also contains constitutional and federal law violations, a newly filed federal lawsuit alleges.Voter rights advocates submitted the 46-page class...

Rights group says Egypt has freed 3 of its arrested staffers

CAIRO (AP) — Three Egyptian rights workers who were arrested and slapped with terrorism-related charges last month were freed on Thursday after an outcry over the government’s crackdown on one of the last rights groups still operating in the country.The government of President...

ENTERTAINMENT

Holiday movies, music specials arrive to light a bleak year

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Bring on the sentimental holiday rom-coms, the chorus of Christmas music specials and the nostalgia of last century’s animated charmers. We’ll take any and all feel-good moments in a year of scarcity.Mariah and Dolly and Charlie Brown are among the comforts...

Theater uses its creativity to defy pandemic and stage shows

NEW YORK (AP) — There's theater on Broadway. You just have to adjust your sights.More than a hundred blocks north of Manhattan's shuttered theater district but on that same famed thoroughfare, an actor recently read his lines from a huge stage.But there was no applause. Instead, all that was...

Hillary, Chelsea Clinton to tell unheralded heroes' stories

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Hillary Rodham Clinton and her daughter, Chelsea, are forming a film production company that they say will tell the stories of people whose voices are often overlooked. Their first project of their HiddenLight company is to be a documentary series called “Gutsy...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Theater uses its creativity to defy pandemic and stage shows

NEW YORK (AP) — There's theater on Broadway. You just have to adjust your sights.More than a hundred blocks...

In some parts of New York, vote count shrouded in secrecy

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Policies favoring secrecy over transparency have meant that New Yorkers will be among...

Wind fans wildfire in California canyons, residents flee

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Powerful gusts pushed flames from a wildfire through Southern California canyons on...

Q&A: Britain's OK of COVID-19 vaccine sparks speedy debate

LONDON (AP) — Britain’s announcement that it has become the first Western country to authorize the...

S. Koreans take college entrance exam amid viral resurgence

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Hundreds of thousands of masked students in South Korea, including 41 confirmed...

Italians told to celebrate Christmas at home to fight virus

MILAN (AP) — Italy recorded a pandemic-high daily death toll Thursday, providing a grim backdrop for...

MLK Breakfast 2021 Save the Date
Matthew Lee and Raf Casert the Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Despite rebel setbacks and an increasingly public rift with NATO allies, the U.S. will stick to its plan to remain in the back seat of the Libya air campaign, the Obama administration insisted Tuesday after three weeks of air missions that have failed to turn the tide against Moammar Gadhafi.

France's defense minister declared that without full American participation, the West probably would not be able to stop attacks by Gadhafi loyalists on besieged rebel cities.

U.S. officials said they were comfortable with their role and had no plans to step up involvement, even as British and French officials said Washington's military might was needed to ensure the mission's success. The Americans said NATO could carry out the operation without a resumption of the heavy U.S. efforts that kicked it off last month.

"The president and this administration believes that NATO, and the coalition of which we remain a partner, is capable of fulfilling that mission of enforcing the no-fly zone, enforcing the arms embargo and providing civilian protection," White House spokesman Jay Carney told reporters.

"The U.S. has not abandoned this operation by any means," State Department spokesman Mark Toner said. "We still are offering support where we can. I don't think it's correct to say that there's somehow discord in the alliance."

The public complaints of Britain and France, however, contradicted that position, and U.S. officials contended privately that some in Europe appeared to be backing down on pledges to take the lead in the operation once the opening phase was over. The administration had not wanted to keep a primary role after that point and had made its participation in the NATO mission contingent on having only a supporting function afterward.

With the disagreement out in the open, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton is expected to hear loud calls for the U.S. to resume heavier fighting when she travels to Germany for meetings of NATO foreign ministers on Thursday and Friday. Those talks are expected to be dominated by the situation in Libya, where rebels fighting forces loyal to Gadhafi are facing increasing challenges and appealing for additional assistance.

At the State Department, spokesman Toner said President Barack Obama had been clear from the beginning that the U.S. "role would diminish as NATO stepped up and took command and control of the operation."

He added, "The U.S., of course, as needed, would help out if requested in other capacities, in other capabilities, but really our role has receded in this mission."

At the Pentagon, Marine Col. Dave Lapan said there was no move to increase American military involvement.

"I don't see any planning to re-assert U.S. strike aircraft and forces as we saw early in the campaign," the Pentagon spokesman said. "NATO has those capabilities to conduct strikes."

"Ultimately, what needs to happen is Gadhafi needs to stop attacking his own people," Lapan said. "The lack of U.S. strike missions doesn't change that."

At NATO headquarters in Brussels, alliance officials agreed and said the operation was succeeding.

NATO Brig. Gen. Mark Van Uhm rejected criticism of the operation. He said the North Atlantic military alliance was performing well in enforcing the arms embargo, patrolling the no-fly zone over Libya and protecting civilians.

"With the assets we have, we're doing a great job," Van Uhm told reporters.

France and Britain differed, calling for the rest of the group, in particular the United States, to step up the campaign.

At a European Union meeting in Luxembourg, Paris lamented the limited U.S. military role in Libya and chided Germany, too, for its lack of involvement. In a dire analysis, France's defense minister said that without full American participation in the combat operation, the West probably couldn't stop Gadhafi's attacks on rebel-held cities.

French Foreign Minister Alain Juppe shredded NATO's united front, saying its actions to this point were "not enough" to ease the pressure on the city of Misrata, which has been subjected to weeks of bombardment by forces loyal to Gadhafi.

"NATO absolutely wanted to lead this operation. Well, voila, this is where we are," Juppe said. "It is unacceptable that Misrata can continue to be bombed by Gadhafi's troops."

Britain's Foreign Secretary William Hague agreed that the allies must "intensify" their efforts, but he used a more diplomatic tone.

"The U.K. has in the last week supplied additional aircraft capable of striking ground targets threatening the civilian population of Libya," Hague said before a meeting of EU foreign ministers. "Of course, it will be welcome if other countries also do the same. There is always more to do."

French Defense Minister Gerard Longuet complained that France and Britain were carrying "the brunt of the burden." He said the reduced U.S. effort - American forces are now in support, not combat, roles in the airstrike campaign - have made it impossible "to loosen the noose around Misrata," which has become a symbol of the resistance against Gadhafi.

Longuet also criticized Germany, which is not taking part in the military operation, saying that Berlin's commitment to primarily back a humanitarian effort only was "secondary" at best. Germany does not take part in NATO's military airstrikes in Libya because it sees the operation as too risky. Italy also has been reluctant to get involved in the airstrikes because it had been Libya's colonial ruler.

France's frustration with the stalemate on the ground, where Libyan rebels have struggled to capitalize on Western air attacks, has been echoed in several Western capitals, but rarely were the comments as barbed as Juppe's.

The reduced U.S. role since NATO took over command on March 31 has clearly affected the operation.

"Let's be realistic. The fact that the U.S. has left the sort of the kinetic part of the air operation has had a sizable impact. That is fairly obvious," said Swedish Foreign Minister Carl Bildt.

Libyan opposition spokesman Ali al-Issawi said that Gadhafi's soldiers have killed about 10,000 people throughout the country and injured 30,000 others, with 7,000 of the injured facing life-threatening wounds. He said an additional 20,000 people were missing and suspected of being in Gadhafi's prisons. There was no way to independently verify his claims.

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Casert reported from Luxembourg. Associated Press writers Pauline Jelinek and Sagar Meghani contributed from Washington, Angela Charlton from Paris, Selcan Hacaoglu from Turkey, Adam Schreck from Doha, Qatar, and Paisley Dodds and Raphael G. Satter from London.

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