07-17-2018  2:37 pm      •     
The Skanner Report
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NEWS BRIEFS

Experience the Culture at the Second Annual Pan African Festival of Oregon

Event will take place from 12 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. August 11 ...

Oregon Humane Society Photo Contest Now Open

Submissions for annual pet photo contest open until August 15 ...

Mark Christopher Lawrence to Perform at Harvey’s Comedy Club July 13-15

Former Big Mike of “Chuck” will perform at 7:30 and 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 7:30 Sunday ...

Dragon Fest 2018

Lions, dragons and breakdancers descend on Seattle’s Chinatown-International District for the Pacific Northwest’s largest...

Residents left with questions after strange sighting in sky

PENDLETON, Ore. (AP) — Many Pendleton residents are questioning what it was they saw last week in the skies over the town.Residents spotted a small white object Wednesday floating above the south area of Pendleton for the better part of an hour, the East Oregonian reported .Some thought the...

Planned Parenthood sues Idaho over abortion reporting law

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest and the Hawaiian Islands is suing the state of Idaho in federal court over new abortion reporting requirements that critics say are unconstitutional and intended to stigmatize women seeking medical care.Planned Parenthood filed...

Planned Parenthood sues Idaho over abortion reporting law

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest and the Hawaiian Islands is suing the state of Idaho in federal court over new abortion reporting requirements that critics say are unconstitutional and intended to stigmatize women seeking medical care.Planned Parenthood filed...

Primary voters in Ferry County will not have to pay postage

SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — It turns out that voters in Washington state's Ferry County will not have to buy their own stamps to mail in their primary ballots this year.Ferry County Auditor Dianna Galvan said Tuesday that she had overcome budget concerns that had prompted her to conclude the small...

OPINION

A Letter from America’s Children

American children struggling with poverty, violence and homelessness, deserve media coverage, too ...

Rep. Maxine Waters Takes Strong Stand for Fair Housing

Congresswoman Maxine Waters recently stepped up to file legislation designed to cure many of regressive ills pushed by Secretary Carson ...

10 Indoor Plants Every Pet Lover Must Have

Dr. Jasmine Streeter shares her tips on stress-busting plants ...

NAACP Statement on Nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court

NAACP opposes Kavanaugh's confirmation to the D.C. Circuit ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Is Trump's retraction his final word on Russia? Unlikely

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Washington political playbook called for President Donald Trump to make clear — and fast — that the U.S. wasn't in the pocket of Russia President Vladimir Putin. On Tuesday, Trump relented, saying he misspoke on Russian election meddling.But apologies and...

Obama delivers veiled rebuke to Trump in Mandela address

JOHANNESBURG (AP) — In his highest profile speech since leaving office, former U.S. President Barack Obama on Tuesday denounced the policies of President Donald Trump without mentioning his name, taking aim at the "politics of fear, resentment, retrenchment," and decrying leaders who are...

San Antonio store owner's killer set for execution

HUNTSVILLE, Texas (AP) — A Texas death row inmate was set for execution Tuesday evening as lawyers argued in the courts that the state parole board improperly refused his clemency request because he's black.Christopher Young was condemned for fatally shooting a San Antonio convenience store...

ENTERTAINMENT

Review: Meg Myers is angry, anguished, exciting on new album

Meg Myers, "Take Me to the Disco" (300 Entertainment)If you assume from the title of Meg Myers' new album that she's taken a fun and frivolous turn, you'll be sorely mistaken. Thrilled, but very mistaken.The superb "Take Me to the Disco" finds Myers angry, anguished, raw and obsessed with...

Review: Bask in the effervescent insanity of 'Mamma Mia 2'

"Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again " is a wholly ridiculous movie that I thoroughly enjoyed. It's the kind of movie that feels and sounds like a summer vacation should: Fizzy, lively, low-stakes and soundtracked by ABBA.This is a world where things generally just work out, where folks are kind and...

Nielsen's top prime-time programs for July 9-15

Prime-time viewership numbers compiled by Nielsen for July 9-15. Listings include the week's ranking and viewership.1. "America's Got Talent" (Tuesday), NBC, 11.55 million.2. "60 Minutes," CBS, 7.3 million.3. "Celebrity Family Feud," ABC, 6.41 million.4. "America's Got Talent" (Wednesday), 5.98...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Blankfein to step aside as Goldman CEO, Solomon to take over

NEW YORK (AP) — Another Wall Street veteran of the financial crisis is stepping aside: Lloyd Blankfein is...

With Trump's endorsement, Roby tries to fend off challenge

MILLBROOK, Ala. (AP) — An Alabama Republican congresswoman who once distanced herself from President Donald...

Many state lawmakers accused of sexual misconduct run again

ATLANTA (AP) — Allegations of sexual misconduct against Kentucky lawmakers have become so common that the...

Lab-grown meat could be in restaurants in 3 years

BERLIN (AP) — A Dutch company that presented the world's first lab-grown beef burger five years ago said...

Writer removed from summit event says he only had a question

HELSINKI (AP) — The writer and political activist who was forcibly removed from a room where U.S. President...

Afghan officials: IS bomber kills 20, Taliban kill 9 police

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — An Islamic State suicide bomber killed 20 people in northern Afghanistan on...

Eric Olson AP Sports Writer

Major League Baseball would fund scholarships and exert greater influence over Division I college baseball under what would be an unprecedented partnership with the NCAA.

If an agreement is reached, it would be the first of its kind and could lead other professional organizations enter partnerships with the NCAA.

The NCAA's point man in the talks, University of Hartford President Walter Harrison, said it could take a year or longer for an agreement to be reached because new or amended legislation might be required.

"There is a lot for us to explore as an association," Harrison said. "The one principle we have is that we want to be completely true to the core values of amateur collegiate baseball... I want to be cautious about whether this will happen or not. These are concepts at the moment."

Still, Harrison said he could see similar arrangements occurring in other sports that generally produce no revenue for colleges. The PGA, for example, might one day help fund scholarships in golf, he said.

According to Harrison, five issues have been discussed with MLB: scholarships, ways to increase diversity, the calendar for the entry draft and College World Series, MLB's involvement in summer leagues, and wooden bats. The discussions were first reported by CBSSports.com.

Oregon State coach Pat Casey told The Associated Press on Tuesday he sees only positives if MLB increases its involvement. North Carolina coach Mike Fox said he's wary of becoming beholden to MLB.

"Usually when you provide money to someone," Fox said, "you want something in return."

MLB spokesman Pat Courtney said it was too early to comment on the discussions. Union head Michael Weiner characterized the talks as "exploratory."

"It's been our view for a long time that while each player gets to make his own decision, we'd like to encourage as many players as possible to use their athletic ability to try to get an education before they try a professional career," Weiner said.

Harrison said the most dramatic proposal would have MLB fund one full scholarship for each Division I program that meets certain criteria. A possibility, he said, is that a program would have to already provide a full allotment of 11.7 scholarships to be eligible for the extra one. MLB stipulated that the scholarship could be awarded to only one player, rather than splitting them.

Harrison said the reason for awarding a full scholarship is that it would potentially attract economically disadvantaged minorities who otherwise might quit playing baseball in hopes of earning a full scholarship in basketball or football. MLB has been particularly concerned about the decrease in number of African-American players in the big leagues.

Black players made up 5 percent of Division I baseball players last season, according to the NCAA. The percentage of blacks in the major leagues was 8.8 percent on opening day this year, according to the University of Central Florida's Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport.

"There are a lot less African-American kids playing at the high school level than there should be, and whatever can be done to help that situation and facilitate opportunities is good," Oregon State's Casey said.

Harrison said the proposal would give MLB no say in who receives the scholarship. Fox said he wondered if MLB would require the awards be given to black student-athletes, and he had other concerns.

"Most of the time a full-scholarship player is one who can pitch for you on the weekend and hit in the middle of the order right out of the gate," Fox said. "Those are the most talented players that are going to go in the first or second round of the draft. The scholarship amount isn't going to be enough to keep these kids from signing pro contracts."

There was no official estimate of how much it would cost MLB to fund scholarships. However, if 150 of the 291 Division I programs met the criteria, and the average one-year scholarship was valued at $20,000, that would be $3 million.

Weiner declined to comment on where the money would come from, other than to say "funding is a real question."

College coaches for years have complained that the baseball scholarship limit is too low. Their calls for an increase have not been heeded, in part, because baseball loses money at most schools. They also have been stymied by gender-equity concerns. An increase in baseball scholarships could require a similar increase in a women's sport for a school to comply with Title IX.

Harrison said Title IX would have to be addressed if MLB were to provide extra scholarships to baseball.

The timing of the MLB entry draft and College World Series also has generated discussion. Harrison said MLB would like the college season to end earlier so drafted players, if signed, could join their organizations sooner. This year, the MLB draft begins June 4, two weeks before the College World Series.

The 56-game regular season already is compacted into 13 weeks and, coaches say, it would be almost impossible to shorten the season without sacrificing games.

MLB also wants to spur player development by sending pitching and hitting instructors to summer leagues where players migrate after the college season. Harrison said that would conflict with current NCAA amateurism rules.

MLB also is pushing for colleges to use wooden bats instead of aluminum, Harrison said.

Harrison said committees will be formed to address each of the five proposals. The next meeting between NCAA, MLB and union officials has not been set.

© 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Carpentry Professionals
Montavilla Jazzfest 2018
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

The Skanner Report

The Skanner Foundation Scholarships