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NORTHWEST NEWS

Federal Officers Use Tear Gas on Portland Protesters

Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty calls officers' behavior "reckless and aggressive" after 26-year-old man struck on head and injured by an impact munition

Oregon Appeals Court Affirms Portland Renter Relocation Law

The Court affirmed a Portland ordinance requiring landlords to pay tenants’ relocation fees if their rent is increased by at least 10% or if they’re evicted without cause.

Seattle Urged to See a 'World Without Law Enforcement'

Proposals include removal of 911 dispatch from Seattle Police control, budget cuts of 50%

Oregon DOJ to Hold Listening Sessions on Institutional Racism; Leaders Wary

DOJ will hold 11 virtual listening sessions for underserved Oregonians.

NEWS BRIEFS

Oregon National Guard Completes Wildland Firefighter Training

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OSU Science Pub Focuses on Influence of Black Lives Matter

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Portland Art Museum and Northwest Film Center Announce Artist Fund

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Oregon reports 332 new coronavirus cases, 2 deaths

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Tear gas used on Portland protesters, 1 man injured

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Federal law enforcement officers used tear gas and crowd-control munitions on people protesting near Portland's federal courthouse during a protest that started Saturday night, Portland police said.Oregon Public Broadcasting reports that friends and family of a...

Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner hurt in jet ski accident

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner sustained serious injuries when he and a passenger on a jet ski collided with a boat on the Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri.According to a police report, Koerner and Cole Coffin were hurt at about 6:30 p.m. Friday when their watercraft...

Missouri football program pushes again for racial justice

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Ryan Walters had just arrived at the University of Missouri to coach safeties for the football program when a series of protests related to racial injustice led to the resignations of the system president and the chancellor of its flagship campus.The student-led movement...

OPINION

Recent Protests Show Need For More Government Collective Bargaining Transparency

Since taxpayers are ultimately responsible for funding government union contract agreements, they should be allowed to monitor the negotiation process ...

The Language of Vote Suppression

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Letter to the Community From Eckhart Tolle Foundation

The Eckhart Tolle Foundation is donating more than 250,000 dollars to organizations that are fighting racism ...

Editorial From the Publisher: Vote as Your Life Depends on It

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AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Legal experts review Black Minnesota teen's life sentence

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Washington's NFL team drops 'Redskins' name after 87 years

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South Carolina man charged with pointing gun at protesters

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ENTERTAINMENT

With new name and album, The Chicks' voices ring loud again

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Jada and Will Smith reveal marriage trouble on Facebook show

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Celebrity birthdays for the week of July 19-25

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U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Kelly Preston, actor and wife of John Travolta, dies at 57

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Look out, Mars: Here we come with a fleet of spacecraft

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Russian constitution change ends hopes for same-sex marriage

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Kosovo president visits prosecutors who indicted him

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4 Azerbaijani troops die in clashes with Armenia

YEREVAN, Armenia (AP) — Armenia and Azerbaijan blamed each other Monday for skirmishes on their volatile...

China sanctions Cruz, Rubio, Smith, Brownback for criticism

BEIJING (AP) — China said Monday it will impose sanctions on three U.S. lawmakers and one ambassador in...

McMenamins
Danica Kirka the Associated Press


London's Olympic Stadium while still under
construction last June

LONDON (AP) -- The pay isn't great, the job is temporary and you could be a target for terrorists. But when Mabel Cross heard that she might be able to work at the 2012 Summer Olympics, she rushed to get to a London recruitment center early.

Immaculate in a navy suit and pink shirt, Cross painstakingly filled out forms Thursday in hopes she could be part of a vast new Olympic workforce. The recruitment effort at a school just outside the Olympic stadium in East London is the most visible signal yet that organizers are ready to stop building arenas and start delivering sports events.

"I wish I could be successful," the 52-year-old said in a voice just above a whisper. "I would be so interested to work for the Olympics."

Some 10,000 security guards are needed and organizers have already received three times that number in applications from around the country. The guards will work alongside British police and the military to deliver a robust - and expensive - security operation involving about 23,700 people.

Planners are also moving to finalize security, ticketing and transport plans despite a series of setbacks that have pushed costs higher.

"We're switching from planning stuff to really doing it," said organizing committee chief executive Paul Deighton.

While Britain's total cost for the event remains at 9.3 billion pounds ($14.6 billion), auditors say there's little wiggle room for the unexpected. The budget for the games is "finely balanced," with less than 0.4 percent of the total left to cover unforeseen expenses, the National Audit Office has said.

If anything unexpected and expensive happens, Olympic officials will have to ask British taxpayers, already struggling in tough economic times, for more money. Paying more for the games would not enhance their popularity among a public already angered by a complex, computerized ticketing system that was riddled with glitches and left many people unable to attend.

Part of the reason for the budget worries is that security costs have continued to rise. British officials last month doubled the funding for security operations at venues, raising overall security costs to more than 1 billion pounds ($1.6 billion).

London Olympic organizing committee chief Sebastian Coe assured The Associated Press in an interview that the games were on track and will stay in the black.

"Occasionally some things are slightly more than you expect," he said, speaking at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. "On a lot of occasions, they're slightly less than you expect, but overall those changes have taken place within that 9.3 billion-pound envelope."

Coe vowed that glitches in the ticketing process were being ironed out before the next batch go on sale in April. About 1.9 million people made 24 million ticket applications for the 6 million tickets available.

Most of the construction work is finished, with centerpiece arenas like Olympic Stadium and the saddle-shaped swimming venue visible for miles. London Mayor Boris Johnson has even taken in the view of Olympic Park from the platform on the almost-finished Orbit, a ruby red sculpture that towers over the stadium.

On weekends, the site can even get quiet - with no beeping construction vehicles backing up.

Work crews are now focusing on details. Ecologists have reintroduced newts to the park. Bats have taken up residence. Even in a bleak London winter, grass has taken root.

Yet in London's famous Underground subway system, things remain more unsettled. Transport planners say the number of trains will increase on the Jubilee Line, one of two key subways that will serve both central London and Olympic Park. Subway travelers will notice changes.

Nigel Holness, the network service director for London Underground, took The Associated Press on a behind-the-scenes tour recently. Standing beside the driver's seat of a subway train, he spoke as the train slipped through the dark tunnels to stations near some of the city's biggest landmarks - Westminster, Waterloo, London Bridge.

"The Jubilee line is absolutely the heart of what we're doing for the Olympics," he said.

The Jubilee is also a huge question mark in a strained system. Around 6.5 billion pounds ($10.2 billion) has been invested in upgrading and extending transport links. The Jubliee, among the newly upgraded lines, marked on London transport maps by a swish of silver.

If the Jubilee has troubles, many spectators trying to get to the games will, in the daily parlance of the London Underground, be forced to "seek alternative routes."

Some 25,000 reporters are expected to land in London for the games and they won't hesitate to make comparisons to Atlanta's 1996 Olympics - where bus drivers got lost, commuters waited hours for trains and athletes nearly missed events. It was so bad in Atlanta that the International Olympic Committee began requiring host cities to make sure their transport systems could deal with the strain.

No one is more aware of the consequences of failure than Holness, who can reel off statistics at will on the improved performance of the Jubilee line. He notes the subway trains are faster than ever - by a minute and a half. They are coming at greater frequency. More of them will be in service at any one time. Switching systems have been improved.

"There will be challenges during the Olympics," he said. "We will be carrying an additional 500,000 people a day. We're working hard to manage that demand."

Challenge is a word heard often lately. Deighton described the hiring of security guards - the "massive mobilization" - as critical to efforts to leave a lasting mark on parts of East London, a neglected area known for its once-thriving but long-derelict shipyards, its dirty canals, slaughterhouses and toxic waste dumps.

Work - even if it is temporary - really matters, especially in these times.

"Jobs change lives," Deighton said.

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Associated Press Writer Pan Pylas contributed to this story from Davos.

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Danica Kirka can be reached at http://twitter.com/DanicaKirka

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