07-10-2020  2:14 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Oregon Appeals Court Affirms Portland Renter Relocation Law

The Court affirmed a Portland ordinance requiring landlords to pay tenants’ relocation fees if their rent is increased by at least 10% or if they’re evicted without cause.

Seattle Urged to See a 'World Without Law Enforcement'

Proposals include removal of 911 dispatch from Seattle Police control, budget cuts of 50%

Oregon DOJ to Hold Listening Sessions on Institutional Racism; Leaders Wary

DOJ will hold 11 virtual listening sessions for underserved Oregonians.

Portland Black Community Frustrated as Violence Mars Protests

Black leaders condemn violence from small group of mostly-white activists as Rose City Justice suspends nightly marches

NEWS BRIEFS

OSU Science Pub Focuses on Influence of Black Lives Matter

The influence of the Black Lives Matter movement will be the focus of a virtual Oregon State University Science Pub on July 13 ...

Capital Rx Establishes Scholarship at Howard University to Support Next Generation of Pharmacists

“Each of us has a role to play in paving a more equitable path for the future of the industry,” said AJ Loiacono, Founder and CEO...

Adams Joins Lawmakers in Move to Repeal Trump’s Birth Control Rule

Without action, SCOTUS decision clears way for Trump Admin rule to take effect ...

Portland Art Museum and Northwest Film Center Announce Artist Fund

The fund will help support artists during COVID crisis and beyond ...

The OHS Museum Reopens Saturday, July 11

The Oregon Historical Society museum will reopen with new hours and new safety protocols ...

School district committee member resigns over racist remarks

WEST LINN, Ore. (AP) — A West Linn school district committee member has resigned after making racist comments during a podcast, the district said Friday.Doris Wehler, who has served on the Long Range Planning Committee for the district since 2001, was asked to resign after her comments on a...

Most of Seattle council pledges to support police defunding

SEATTLE (AP) — A majority of Seattle City Council members say they agree with a proposal by advocates to defund the police department by 50% and reallocate the dollars to other community needs.Council members Lisa Herbold, Dan Strauss and Andrew Lewis added support Thursday to a road map set...

Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner hurt in jet ski accident

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner sustained serious injuries when he and a passenger on a jet ski collided with a boat on the Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri.According to a police report, Koerner and Cole Coffin were hurt at about 6:30 p.m. Friday when their watercraft...

Missouri football program pushes again for racial justice

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Ryan Walters had just arrived at the University of Missouri to coach safeties for the football program when a series of protests related to racial injustice led to the resignations of the system president and the chancellor of its flagship campus.The student-led movement...

OPINION

Recent Protests Show Need For More Government Collective Bargaining Transparency

Since taxpayers are ultimately responsible for funding government union contract agreements, they should be allowed to monitor the negotiation process ...

The Language of Vote Suppression

A specific kind of narrative framing is used to justify voter suppression methods and to cover up the racism that motivates their use. ...

Letter to the Community From Eckhart Tolle Foundation

The Eckhart Tolle Foundation is donating more than 250,000 dollars to organizations that are fighting racism ...

Editorial From the Publisher: Vote as Your Life Depends on It

The Republican-controlled Senate won’t pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, no matter how hard Oregon’s senators and others work to push for change. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

2 arrested, 2 wanted after 11-year-old killed on July Fourth

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two men have been arrested and two others are wanted in connection with the killing of an 11-year-old boy who was shot during a Fourth of July cookout in Washington, police said Friday. The boy, Davon McNeal, was shot in the head during an exchange of gunfire between five...

Protester: Man pulls gun on anniversary of flag’s removal

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Counterprotesters said a passing driver pointed a gun at them Friday and said “All Lives Matter,” as competing groups gathered in front of South Carolina’s capitol building to mark the five-year anniversary of the state's removal of the Confederate...

Attorney not disputing suicide findings in Black man's death

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The attorney for the family of a Black man found hanging from a tree in a Southern California city park last month on Friday did not dispute investigators' findings ruling the death a suicide. The family of Robert Fuller was absorbing the news and grieving, their lawyer...

ENTERTAINMENT

Armie Hammer and Elizabeth Chambers separate after 10 years

Actor Armie Hammer and wife Elizabeth Chambers are splitting up after 10 years of marriage and 13 years together. Both parties posted the same message on their respective instagram accounts Friday, writing that they have decided to “turn the page and move on" from the marriage.The couple...

Authorities search for 'Glee' star believed to have drowned

Authorities planned Friday to renew the search for “Glee” star Naya Rivera, who is believed to have drowned in a Southern California lake while boating with her 4-year-old son.Rivera, 33, disappeared after renting the pontoon boat for three hours Wednesday afternoon and taking it out...

How The Chicks dropped the word 'Dixie' from their name

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — When The Chicks decided to drop the word “Dixie” from the band's name, it was the culmination of years of internal discussions and attempts to distance itself from negative connotations with the word. The 13-time Grammy-winning trio made the switch last...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Singer says lawsuit over Lady A name is 'white privilege'

Singer Anita White, who was sued by a country group over the use of the name Lady A, says the group is using their...

Church singing ban strikes sour note with California pastor

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Crossroads Community Church Senior Pastor Jim Clark wants to keep his 1,500...

Lawyer: Over 150 Minneapolis officers seeking disability

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — More than 150 Minneapolis police officers are filing work-related disability claims...

Cyprus: US military training won't harm Russia, China ties

NICOSIA, Cyprus (AP) — Cyprus’ government said Friday that a U.S. decision to provide education and...

Brazil LGBTQ group hides from virus in Copacabana building

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — In a courtyard a few blocks from Rio de Janeiro’s Copacabana beach, a dozen...

Hundreds try to storm Serbian parliament as protests heat up

BELGRADE, Serbia (AP) — Hundreds of demonstrators tried to storm Serbia's parliament on Friday, clashing...

McMenamins
By Ayana Jones, Special to the NNPA from the Philadelphia Tribune

PHILADELPHIA (NNPA) - A new study released by the Alliance for Excellent Education indicated lowering the city's high school dropout rate could significantly increase Philadelphia's job creation, homeownership, spending and investment income.
The results issued in "The Economic Benefits from Halving Philadelphia's Dropout Rate: A Boom to Regional Businesses" come from a larger study that measured on a city-by-city basis the growth in jobs, home ownership, levels of spending and investment and car sales that will result from cutting the high school dropout rate in half in the nation's 50 largest cities and the 45 metropolitan areas surrounding them.
"The report underscores the notion that the best economic stimulus package is a high school diploma," said Bob Wise, Alliance president and former governor of West Virginia.
"If the U.S. is to improve its competitiveness in the global economy, it must have an educational system that meets the fast-growing demand for high-level skills."
The report found that an estimated 16,400 students from the Philadelphia metropolitan area dropped out from the class of 2008. If these rates were reduced by half, graduates in the Philadelphia region would likely have supported 900 additional jobs in their local areas and increased the gross regional product by as much as $159 million by the time they reached the midpoint of their careers. The report indicated they would have boosted tax revenue by $18 million per year and could have bought homes worth $294 million more than what they would spend without a diploma.
"If you look at our advocacy around educational issues and our specific programs in support of kids remaining in school it would be hard for us to find anything in (the) analysis that we would be in disagreement with," said Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce President Rob Wonderling.
"We do think that there is a direct correlation between adequately funded public education and the school district's dropout rates," he said.
"It's really critical for this city and this region to compete globally with other regions — that we have a highly skilled and qualified workforce."
Wonderling said the business community is striving to create the workforce of tomorrow by supporting literacy and internship programs and encouraging young people to learn about entrepreneurship.
He noted qualified workers are needed for jobs that would be created in areas of alternative energy, nanotechnology, life sciences and health care — key sectors of the region's economy.
"We really feel strongly that reducing the dropout rate is an economic imperative for the greater Philadelphia region," Wonderling.
Sulaiman Rahman, chairman of the African-American Chamber of Commerce, concurs.
"With an educated workforce, with the capacity to take on the job opportunities that exist in the city, you have more people who are at a living wage and are able to patronize the businesses that are local," Rahman said.
"For local businesses it's important to be able to hire the intellectual capital to be able to take their businesses to the next level."
"Many small businesses have a challenge identifying talent to help them take their business to the next level, so that affects capacity and scalability of small businesses if the human capital is not available for them to grow their business," he added.
According to the Office of the White House, a total of 1.2 million students are dropping out every year.
Earlier this month, President Barack Obama announced strategies to reduce the dropout rate and challenged states to identify high schools with graduation rates below 60 percent. The Obama administration is investing $3.5 billion in funding transformational changes in the nation's low-performing schools.
"It is time for all of us, no matter what our backgrounds, to come together and solve this epidemic," Obama said. "Stemming the tide of dropouts will require turning around our low-performing schools. Just 2,000 high schools in cities like Detroit, Los Angeles and Philadelphia produce over 50 percent of America's dropouts. Let us all make turning around our schools our collective responsibility as Americans."
The School District of Philadelphia is working to combat the dropout problem. After numerous attempts, a spokesperson did not have the most recent high school dropout figures for The Tribune, however recent reports indicated the rate is reaching 50 percent.
"If we would think through it on a very simple level we'd know that economic success is very closely tied to educational attainment," said Majeedah Scott, assistant director, Multiple Pathways to Graduation.
"Certainly now we're seeing the demand for the jobs out there that really require that folks have a high school diploma and in most cases some skill beyond that. If we are able get more of our young people graduated, they're able to contribute to our local economy more. So I would have to say that report was right on the money."
Scott said the district's accelerated high school system has been instrumental in deterring students from dropping out.
According to Scott, approximately 3,000 students are currently enrolled in the accelerated schools where they can earn their diplomas.
"Sometimes we have young people who have fell behind and have not been keeping up with credit accumulation so the accelerated schools allow them to recoup those credits at a quicker pace while making sure that are still learning the skills that they need to be successful," Scott said.
The accelerated schools provide social support and wraparound services for the students, many of whom are facing personal issues.
Scott said, "One of the things that the young people tell us is one of the things that keeps them engaged in the educational environment is when they have people there they feel care about them."

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