09-27-2021  5:30 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Police Use New Ordinance to Crack Down on Street Racing

The offenses have been labeled as “Unlawful Street Takeover” and “Unlawful Staging of a Street Takeover Event.”

Oregon Lawmakers Fail to Agree on House Districts as Deadline Looms

Republicans failed to show up for a session to redraw the state's congressional districts Saturday, thwarting majority Democrats’ attempts to pass new political maps before a looming deadline

Oregon School Board Ban on Anti-Racist, LGBT Signs Draws Ire

An Oregon school board has banned educators from displaying Black Lives Matter and gay pride symbols, prompting a torrent of recriminations and threats to boycott the town and its businesses.

New, Long-Term Black Lives Matter Public Art Piece Installed at Seattle City Hall

Mayor Jenny A. Durkan and the Seattle Office of Arts & Culture today announced that a new, long-term Black Lives Matter public art piece has been installed at Seattle City Hall.

NEWS BRIEFS

5th Annual Yard Tree Giveaway Events to Begin

Free trees for all Portlanders continue Portland Parks & Recreation’s Urban Forestry division’s mission to grow, preserve, and...

House Passes Historic Abortion Rights Legislation With Support of Reps. Bonamici, Defazio, Blumenauer and Schrader

Today’s vote to pass the Women’s Health Protection Act comes three weeks after Texas’s radical 6-week abortion ban went into...

Oregon Announces Stabilization Grant Opportunity to Assist Child Care Providers

Oregon received approximately 4 million in grant funding from the federal American Rescue Plan Act to be paid directly to eligible...

TriMet Plans Weekend Construction Along MAX Red Line to Help Keep Trains Running Efficiently

Shuttle buses will replace MAX Sept. 25-26 between Gateway Transit Center and Portland International Airport ...

Larsen Chairs Hearing on Surge in Air Rage Incidents, Effects on Workers, Airlines, Airports

The hearing was an opportunity for the subcommittee to examine the alarming increase in disruptive and unruly airline passengers, the...

Health officials see COVID cases tied to Pendleton Round-Up

PENDLETEON, Ore. (AP) — Health officials in Umatilla County, Oregon, say they are starting to see COVID-19 cases linked to the Pendleton Round-Up. Umatilla County Public Health Director Joseph Fiumara told county commissioners Monday the county’s case count last week was 550...

Deputy shoots, kills person in Portland suburb traffic stop

HAPPY VALLEY, Ore. (AP) — A Clackamas County deputy shot and killed a person during a traffic stop in the Portland suburb of Happy Valley early Monday. The sheriff’s office said a deputy initiated the traffic stop around 2 a.m. near Southeast 145th Avenue and Southeast King...

AP Top 25 Takeaways: Clemson falls during frenetic afternoon

For about 45 minutes late Saturday afternoon, college football was on overload. North Carolina State went from agony to ecstasy against No. 9 Clemson. Baylor stopped a 2-point conversion to upset No. 14 Iowa State. No. 16 Arkansas finished off No. 7 Texas A&M to claim a Lone...

BC beats Mizzou 41-34 in OT on Flowers catch, Sebastian INT

BOSTON (AP) — Denis Grosel threw a 10-yard touchdown pass to Zay Flowers in overtime, and Brandon Sebastian’s interception sealed the victory on Saturday as Boston College recovered after blowing two fourth-quarter leads to beat Missouri 41-34. BC coach Jeff Hafley said he...

OPINION

Homelessness, Houselessness in the Richest Country in the World: An Uncommon Logic

When and why did the United States of America chose the wealth of a few over the health, wealth, and well-being of so many ...

American Business Leaders Step Up to Fight Inequities in the South

With COVID-19 still an omnipresent concern and the country’s recovery still very much in jeopardy, individuals, families, and communities are struggling to deal with issues that have only been exacerbated by the pandemic. ...

Waters Statement on 20th Anniversary of September 11 Attacks

Twenty years ago today, our nation suffered devastating terrorist attacks on our soil and against our people that wholly and completely changed the world as we knew it. ...

Letter to the Editor: Reform the Recall

Any completely unqualified attention seeker with ,000 for the candidate‘s filing fee can be the largest state in the Union’s next governor ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Racial alliances, rivalries on display in LA mayor's race

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The diversity of Los Angeles is on display in the emerging race to replace Mayor Eric Garcetti and the winning candidate who emerges from the growing field of hopefuls will need to navigate rivalries and forge alliances across the city’s racial and ethnic communities. ...

Greyhound settles lawsuit over immigration sweeps on buses

SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Greyhound Lines Inc. will pay [scripts/homepage/home.php].2 million to settle a lawsuit over the bus line’s practice of allowing U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents to board its buses in Washington state to conduct warrantless immigration sweeps, the state attorney general said Monday. ...

NATO-led mission increases patrols on Kosovo-Serbia border

PRISTINA, Kosovo (AP) — The NATO-led KFOR mission in Kosovo increased its patrols Monday on the border with Serbia in a bid to deescalate tensions between the two Balkan foes over a dispute about license plates. KFOR, with around 4,000 troops from 28 countries, is led by NATO...

ENTERTAINMENT

‘Dear Evan Hansen’ opens 2nd to ‘Shang-Chi’ at box office

“Dear Evan Hansen” may have been a hit on Broadway, but the filmed adaptation of the Tony-winning show is off to a slow start at the box office in its first weekend in theaters. The Universal musical that’s playing exclusively in theaters grossed an estimated .5 million from 3,364...

'Moulin Rouge! The Musical' sashays home with 10 Tony Awards

NEW YORK (AP) — “Moulin Rouge! The Musical,” a jukebox adaptation of Baz Luhrmann’s hyperactive 2001 movie, won the best new musical crown at the Tony Awards on a Sunday night when Broadway looked back to honor shows shuttered by COVID-19, mourn its fallen and also look forward to welcoming...

Celebrity birthdays for the week of Oct. 3-9

Celebrity birthdays for the week of Oct. 3-9: Oct. 3: Composer Steve Reich is 85. Singer Chubby Checker is 80. Actor Alan Rachins (“Dharma and Greg”) is 79. Singer-guitarist Lindsey Buckingham of Fleetwood Mac is 72. Jazz saxophonist Ronnie Laws is 71. Blues singer Keb’...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Biden plan seeks to expand education, from pre-K to college

WASHINGTON (AP) — As Democrats push ahead with President Joe Biden’s .5 trillion rebuilding plan, they’re...

Taliban issue no-shave order to barbers in Afghan province

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The Taliban on Monday banned barbershops in a southern Afghanistan province from...

Facebook puts Instagram for kids on hold after pushback

Facebook is putting a hold on the development of a kids' version of Instagram, geared toward children under 13, to...

London police charge man with murder of teacher Sabina Nessa

LONDON (AP) — British police charged a 36-year-old man on Monday with the murder of Sabina Nessa, a primary...

Azerbaijan, Armenia mark anniversary of their war

MOSCOW (AP) — Azerbaijan and Armenia are marking the anniversary of the start of their six-week war in which...

Strong quake hits Greek island of Crete; 1 dead, 20 injured

ATHENS, Greece (AP) — A strong, prolonged earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of at least 5.8 struck the...

By Ayana Jones, Special to the NNPA from the Philadelphia Tribune

PHILADELPHIA (NNPA) - A new study released by the Alliance for Excellent Education indicated lowering the city's high school dropout rate could significantly increase Philadelphia's job creation, homeownership, spending and investment income.
The results issued in "The Economic Benefits from Halving Philadelphia's Dropout Rate: A Boom to Regional Businesses" come from a larger study that measured on a city-by-city basis the growth in jobs, home ownership, levels of spending and investment and car sales that will result from cutting the high school dropout rate in half in the nation's 50 largest cities and the 45 metropolitan areas surrounding them.
"The report underscores the notion that the best economic stimulus package is a high school diploma," said Bob Wise, Alliance president and former governor of West Virginia.
"If the U.S. is to improve its competitiveness in the global economy, it must have an educational system that meets the fast-growing demand for high-level skills."
The report found that an estimated 16,400 students from the Philadelphia metropolitan area dropped out from the class of 2008. If these rates were reduced by half, graduates in the Philadelphia region would likely have supported 900 additional jobs in their local areas and increased the gross regional product by as much as $159 million by the time they reached the midpoint of their careers. The report indicated they would have boosted tax revenue by $18 million per year and could have bought homes worth $294 million more than what they would spend without a diploma.
"If you look at our advocacy around educational issues and our specific programs in support of kids remaining in school it would be hard for us to find anything in (the) analysis that we would be in disagreement with," said Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce President Rob Wonderling.
"We do think that there is a direct correlation between adequately funded public education and the school district's dropout rates," he said.
"It's really critical for this city and this region to compete globally with other regions — that we have a highly skilled and qualified workforce."
Wonderling said the business community is striving to create the workforce of tomorrow by supporting literacy and internship programs and encouraging young people to learn about entrepreneurship.
He noted qualified workers are needed for jobs that would be created in areas of alternative energy, nanotechnology, life sciences and health care — key sectors of the region's economy.
"We really feel strongly that reducing the dropout rate is an economic imperative for the greater Philadelphia region," Wonderling.
Sulaiman Rahman, chairman of the African-American Chamber of Commerce, concurs.
"With an educated workforce, with the capacity to take on the job opportunities that exist in the city, you have more people who are at a living wage and are able to patronize the businesses that are local," Rahman said.
"For local businesses it's important to be able to hire the intellectual capital to be able to take their businesses to the next level."
"Many small businesses have a challenge identifying talent to help them take their business to the next level, so that affects capacity and scalability of small businesses if the human capital is not available for them to grow their business," he added.
According to the Office of the White House, a total of 1.2 million students are dropping out every year.
Earlier this month, President Barack Obama announced strategies to reduce the dropout rate and challenged states to identify high schools with graduation rates below 60 percent. The Obama administration is investing $3.5 billion in funding transformational changes in the nation's low-performing schools.
"It is time for all of us, no matter what our backgrounds, to come together and solve this epidemic," Obama said. "Stemming the tide of dropouts will require turning around our low-performing schools. Just 2,000 high schools in cities like Detroit, Los Angeles and Philadelphia produce over 50 percent of America's dropouts. Let us all make turning around our schools our collective responsibility as Americans."
The School District of Philadelphia is working to combat the dropout problem. After numerous attempts, a spokesperson did not have the most recent high school dropout figures for The Tribune, however recent reports indicated the rate is reaching 50 percent.
"If we would think through it on a very simple level we'd know that economic success is very closely tied to educational attainment," said Majeedah Scott, assistant director, Multiple Pathways to Graduation.
"Certainly now we're seeing the demand for the jobs out there that really require that folks have a high school diploma and in most cases some skill beyond that. If we are able get more of our young people graduated, they're able to contribute to our local economy more. So I would have to say that report was right on the money."
Scott said the district's accelerated high school system has been instrumental in deterring students from dropping out.
According to Scott, approximately 3,000 students are currently enrolled in the accelerated schools where they can earn their diplomas.
"Sometimes we have young people who have fell behind and have not been keeping up with credit accumulation so the accelerated schools allow them to recoup those credits at a quicker pace while making sure that are still learning the skills that they need to be successful," Scott said.
The accelerated schools provide social support and wraparound services for the students, many of whom are facing personal issues.
Scott said, "One of the things that the young people tell us is one of the things that keeps them engaged in the educational environment is when they have people there they feel care about them."

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