07-04-2022  7:22 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Eugene Woman Attacked With Acid for Third Time Since March

A Eugene, Oregon, woman who had acid thrown on her while walking her dog in March has been the target of two additional acid attacks at her home

Minimum Wage Increase Initiative Qualifies in WA City

An initiative to increase the minimum hourly wage in Tukwila, Washington, by more than has qualified for the November ballot.

Sydney McLaughlin Does It Again, Breaks Own World Record

When asked how she was going to celebrated afterward, McLaughlin joked: “Eating some real food besides vegetables. Like a cheeseburger or something, some pancakes.”

Inslee Seeks Abortion Rights Amendment to State Constitution

Gov. Jay Inslee will push for a state constitutional amendment to protect abortion rights within the state, and laws that make it difficult for other states to investigate whether their own residents have visited Washington for abortion care.

NEWS BRIEFS

On View This Weekend: Afro-American Heritage Bicentennial Commemorative Quilt

A History Spotlight from Boyle Family Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk ...

State Continues Paying Out Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program Applications to Renters and Landlords Across Oregon

More than 60,000 Oregon households facing pandemic hardship receive over 6 million in rental assistance relief ...

KGW and TEGNA Foundation Award $40k in Community Grants to Aid Four Oregon Nonprofit Organizations

Among the grant recipients are Urban Nature Partners PDX, Self Enhancement, Inc (SEI), Portland YouthBuilders (PYB), and p:ear. ...

Hawthorne, Morrison Bridges Will Close to Motorized Vehicles for July 4 Fireworks Show

The bridges will remain open for bicyclists and pedestrians. ...

Increased Emergency Snap Benefits Continue in July

Approximately 422,000 households will receive an estimated million in extra food benefits ...

Climber rescued after 700-foot fall on Mount Hood

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A Happy Valley man was rescued after a 700-foot fall from the Old Chute area near the summit of Mount Hood, authorities wrote in a news release Sunday. Around 6:30 a.m. Saturday, a 43-year-old man climbing up a popular route up the mountain’s western face...

US testing new fire retardant, critics push other methods

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — U.S. officials are testing a new wildfire retardant after two decades of buying millions of gallons annually from one supplier, but watchdogs say the expensive strategy is overly fixated on aerial attacks at the expense of hiring more fire-line digging ground crews. ...

OPINION

Choice Without Shackles

The constitutional originalists do what they must to keep ignorance viable, to keep us anchored to the certainties of the old days ...

Biden’s Menthol Ban Follows the ‘Racist Law’ Playbook

The ban on menthol threatens to do more harm than good for the Black people these activists purport to want to protect ...

Black Women Will Suffer the Harshest Consequences After the Overturn of Roe

Black women are nearly three times more likely to die during childbirth than white women and are more likely to face maternal health issues. ...

Justice Clarence Thomas and the Conservative Supreme Court Have Fanned the Flames of Racism in America

Former President Donald Trump’s Make America Great Again cry proved an easy between-the-lines moniker, but even that stood as a dog whistle – until now. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

French soccer tournament celebrates diversity, fights racism

CRETEIL, France (AP) — An amateur soccer tournament in France aimed at celebrating ethnic diversity is attracting talent scouts, sponsors and increasing public attention, by uniting young players from low-income neighborhoods with high-profile names in the sport. The National...

Black Jewish leader works to boost community, inclusiveness

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Nate Looney is a Black man who grew up in Los Angeles, a descendant of enslaved people from generations ago. He’s also an observant, kippah-wearing Jew. But he doesn’t always feel welcome in Jewish spaces — his skin color sometimes elicits questioning...

The long, ongoing debate over ‘All men are created equal’

NEW YORK (AP) — Kevin Jennings is CEO of the Lambda Legal organization, a prominent advocate for LGBTQ rights. He sees his mission in part as fulfilling that hallowed American principle: “All men are created equal.” “Those words say to me, ‘Do better, America.’ And what I...

ENTERTAINMENT

Sonny Barger, figurehead of Hells Angels, dies at 83

LIVERMORE, Calif. (AP) — Sonny Barger, the leather-clad fixture of 1960s counterculture and figurehead of the Hells Angels motorcycle club who was at the notorious Rolling Stones concert at Altamont Speedway, has died. He was 83. Barger's death was announced on his Facebook page...

Review: Austen-era schemes, dreams fill 'Mr. Malcolm's List'

“It is a truth universally acknowledged,” goes one of the more famous opening lines in English literature, “that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.” That’s Jane Austen, beginning her 1813 “Pride and Prejudice.” Austen herself has...

Review: Imagine Dragons offer light at the end of the tunnel

“Mercury — Act 2,” Imagine Dragons (Interscope) If you were hiding under your bed after listening to the last album by Imagine Dragons, it's time to come out. The second volume of “Mercury” is upbeat, often Caribbean-spiced and throbbing. It's the sound of a band getting its...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

The long, ongoing debate over ‘All men are created equal’

NEW YORK (AP) — Kevin Jennings is CEO of the Lambda Legal organization, a prominent advocate for LGBTQ rights....

From one July Fourth to the next, a steep slide for Biden

WASHINGTON (AP) — Last Fourth of July, President Joe Biden gathered hundreds of people outside the White House...

Putin declares victory in embattled Donbas region of Luhansk

POKROVSK, Ukraine (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin on Monday declared victory in the eastern Ukrainian...

Ukraine lays out 0B 'recovery plan' for postwar future

LUGANO, Switzerland (AP) — Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said Monday the reconstruction of his...

Hope and despair: Kathy Gannon on 35 years in Afghanistan

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The Afghan policeman opened fire on us with his AK-47, emptying 26 bullets into the...

How a favela in Rio got its clean water back, for ,300

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Butterflies and waxbills flit through the Enchanted Valley just outside Rio de Janeiro’s...

By Ayana Jones, Special to the NNPA from the Philadelphia Tribune

PHILADELPHIA (NNPA) - A new study released by the Alliance for Excellent Education indicated lowering the city's high school dropout rate could significantly increase Philadelphia's job creation, homeownership, spending and investment income.
The results issued in "The Economic Benefits from Halving Philadelphia's Dropout Rate: A Boom to Regional Businesses" come from a larger study that measured on a city-by-city basis the growth in jobs, home ownership, levels of spending and investment and car sales that will result from cutting the high school dropout rate in half in the nation's 50 largest cities and the 45 metropolitan areas surrounding them.
"The report underscores the notion that the best economic stimulus package is a high school diploma," said Bob Wise, Alliance president and former governor of West Virginia.
"If the U.S. is to improve its competitiveness in the global economy, it must have an educational system that meets the fast-growing demand for high-level skills."
The report found that an estimated 16,400 students from the Philadelphia metropolitan area dropped out from the class of 2008. If these rates were reduced by half, graduates in the Philadelphia region would likely have supported 900 additional jobs in their local areas and increased the gross regional product by as much as $159 million by the time they reached the midpoint of their careers. The report indicated they would have boosted tax revenue by $18 million per year and could have bought homes worth $294 million more than what they would spend without a diploma.
"If you look at our advocacy around educational issues and our specific programs in support of kids remaining in school it would be hard for us to find anything in (the) analysis that we would be in disagreement with," said Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce President Rob Wonderling.
"We do think that there is a direct correlation between adequately funded public education and the school district's dropout rates," he said.
"It's really critical for this city and this region to compete globally with other regions — that we have a highly skilled and qualified workforce."
Wonderling said the business community is striving to create the workforce of tomorrow by supporting literacy and internship programs and encouraging young people to learn about entrepreneurship.
He noted qualified workers are needed for jobs that would be created in areas of alternative energy, nanotechnology, life sciences and health care — key sectors of the region's economy.
"We really feel strongly that reducing the dropout rate is an economic imperative for the greater Philadelphia region," Wonderling.
Sulaiman Rahman, chairman of the African-American Chamber of Commerce, concurs.
"With an educated workforce, with the capacity to take on the job opportunities that exist in the city, you have more people who are at a living wage and are able to patronize the businesses that are local," Rahman said.
"For local businesses it's important to be able to hire the intellectual capital to be able to take their businesses to the next level."
"Many small businesses have a challenge identifying talent to help them take their business to the next level, so that affects capacity and scalability of small businesses if the human capital is not available for them to grow their business," he added.
According to the Office of the White House, a total of 1.2 million students are dropping out every year.
Earlier this month, President Barack Obama announced strategies to reduce the dropout rate and challenged states to identify high schools with graduation rates below 60 percent. The Obama administration is investing $3.5 billion in funding transformational changes in the nation's low-performing schools.
"It is time for all of us, no matter what our backgrounds, to come together and solve this epidemic," Obama said. "Stemming the tide of dropouts will require turning around our low-performing schools. Just 2,000 high schools in cities like Detroit, Los Angeles and Philadelphia produce over 50 percent of America's dropouts. Let us all make turning around our schools our collective responsibility as Americans."
The School District of Philadelphia is working to combat the dropout problem. After numerous attempts, a spokesperson did not have the most recent high school dropout figures for The Tribune, however recent reports indicated the rate is reaching 50 percent.
"If we would think through it on a very simple level we'd know that economic success is very closely tied to educational attainment," said Majeedah Scott, assistant director, Multiple Pathways to Graduation.
"Certainly now we're seeing the demand for the jobs out there that really require that folks have a high school diploma and in most cases some skill beyond that. If we are able get more of our young people graduated, they're able to contribute to our local economy more. So I would have to say that report was right on the money."
Scott said the district's accelerated high school system has been instrumental in deterring students from dropping out.
According to Scott, approximately 3,000 students are currently enrolled in the accelerated schools where they can earn their diplomas.
"Sometimes we have young people who have fell behind and have not been keeping up with credit accumulation so the accelerated schools allow them to recoup those credits at a quicker pace while making sure that are still learning the skills that they need to be successful," Scott said.
The accelerated schools provide social support and wraparound services for the students, many of whom are facing personal issues.
Scott said, "One of the things that the young people tell us is one of the things that keeps them engaged in the educational environment is when they have people there they feel care about them."

Jan. 6 Committe Hearings - Day 6

A suprise hearing with newly discovered evidence will be held Tuesday, June 28 at 9:45 a.m. PT (12:45 p.m. ET).

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