05 25 2016
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  • On Tuesday, a judge ordered the 78-year-old Cosby to stand trial on sexual assault charges 
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  • The judge concluded Officer Edward Nero played little role in the arrest and wasn't responsible for the failure by police to buckle Gray in  
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  • Bill Cosby faces a preliminary hearing Tuesday to determine if his criminal sex-assault case in suburban Philadelphia goes to trial.Prosecutors had declined to charge the comedian-actor over the 2005 complaint, but arrested him in December after his explosive deposition in the woman's lawsuit became public. In the testimony given in that deposition, Cosby is grilled about giving drugs and alcohol to women before sex; making secret payments to ex-lovers; and hosting Andrea Constand at his home. They knew each other through Temple University, where he was a trustee and she managed the women's basketball team. Bill Cosby's wife refused to answer dozens of questions during a combative deposition in a defamation lawsuit filed by seven women who say the comedian branded them liars after they accused him of sexually assaulting them, according to a transcript released Friday. Camille Cosby was subjected to intense questioning by the women's lawyer, who repeatedly pressed her to say whether she believes her husband "acted with a lack of integrity" during their 52-year marriage. The lawyer also asked if her husband used his position and power "to manipulate young women." Camille Cosby didn't answer those questions and many others after her lawyer cited marital privilege, the legal protection given to communications between spouses. She repeatedly said she had "no opinion" when pressed on whether she viewed her husband's behavior as dishonest and a violation of their marriage vows. About 50 women have publicly accused Bill Cosby of forcing unwanted sexual contact on them decades ago. Cosby has denied the allegations. He faces a criminal case in Pennsylvania, where prosecutors have charged him with sexually violating a former Temple University employee, Andrea Constand. He has pleaded not guilty. Camille Cosby answered questions in the deposition Feb. 22 and again April 19 after her lawyers argued unsuccessfully to stop it. A judge ruled she would have to give a deposition but said she could refuse to answer questions about private communications between her and her husband. Camille Cosby's lawyer, Monique Pressley, repeatedly cited that privilege and advised her not to answer many questions asked by the women's lawyer, Joseph Cammarata. The exchanges between Cammarata and Cosby became testy at times, and she admonished him: "Don't lecture me. Just keep going with the questions." Using a transcript of a deposition Bill Cosby gave in a civil lawsuit filed by Constand in 2005 and a transcript of an interview she gave to Oprah Winfrey in 2000, Cammarata asked Camille Cosby about extramarital affairs her husband had. "Were you aware of your husband setting up trusts for the benefit of women that he had a sexual relationship with?" Cammarata asked. She didn't answer after her lawyer cited marital privilege. Cammarata asked her about Shawn Thompson, a woman who said Bill Cosby fathered her daughter, Autumn Jackson, in the 1970s. Jackson was convicted in 1997 of attempting to extort money from Bill Cosby to prevent her from telling a tabloid she's his daughter. He acknowledged he had an affair with her mother and had given her money. "Was it a big deal when this came up in the 1970s that your husband had — big deal to you that your husband had an extramarital affair and potentially had a daughter from that extramarital affair?" Cammarata asked. "It was a big deal then, yes," Camille Cosby replied. She said she had "no opinion" on whether her husband's admission he obtained quaaludes to give to women with whom he wanted to have sex violated their marriage vows. Her lawyer objected and instructed her not to answer when Cammarata asked her if she ever suspected she had been given any type of drug to alter her state of consciousness when she had sex with her husband. A spokesman for the Cosbys declined to comment on her deposition. The Cosbys have a home in Shelburne Falls, an hour's drive from Springfield, where the lawsuit, seeking unspecified damages, was filed. An attorney handling a separate lawsuit against Bill Cosby revealed Friday that Playboy magazine founder Hugh Hefner provided sworn testimony Wednesday. In the sexual battery lawsuit filed in Los Angeles, Judy Huth says Cosby forced her to perform a sex act on him at the Playboy Mansion around 1974, when she was 15. Bill Cosby's former lawyers have accused Huth of attempting to extort him before filing the case and have tried unsuccessfully to have it dismissed. Huth's attorney, Gloria Allred, said Hefner's testimony will remain under seal for now. Hefner also was named as a defendant in a case filed Monday by former model Chloe Goins, who accuses Bill Cosby of drugging and sexually abusing her at the Playboy Mansion in 2008.   The Associated Press generally doesn't identify people who say they're victims of sexual abuse, but the women accusing Cosby have come forward to tell their stories.___AP Entertainment Writer Anthony McCartney contributed to this report from Los Angeles.
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SEATTLE—By day, the historic Pioneer Square district is a vibrant cross-section of art galleries, toy shops and high-end restaurants that attract shoppers and tourists from around the world.

By night, it can reveal a not-so-chichi alter ego.

Last month's attack on a Seattle Seahawks player near a popular night club recently prompted the team's coach to bar his players from the area, even though it's just blocks from their home field.

"It's a place that probably has more diversity, in terms of both an economic and an ethnic sense, than any other neighborhood" in the city, said Peter Aaron, owner of the independent Elliott Bay Book Co.

The 35-year-old bookstore — a place where you're more likely to be shushed than shoved — shares block space with bars and hip-hop nightclubs that have a sometimes rougher mix of characters.

As daylight dwindles, body-thumping bass spills out into the night air and the area morphs into another creature.

On a recent Saturday night, free admission and cheap drinks boosted the crowd at Larry's Nightclub. Seattle Seahawks safety Ken Hamlin was severely beaten in a fight outside the club on Oct. 17. The bar was a favorite haunt for some of the team's players, but the Hamlin incident, along with an unrelated fight nearby a few weeks earlier, prompted coach Mike Holmgren to issue his edict.

"I mainly want the guys to think about where they go," Holmgren said. "It's an organizational guideline and I presented it to the players. I think common sense plays a role."

The spate of violence hasn't stopped crowds from gathering inside Larry's.

Music from Kanye West, the Black Eyed Peas and Chris Brown pull customers onto the dance floor as the DJ gives a shout out to go-go dancers on tables along the walls. Wearing pink or blue tinsel-like wigs, clunky black boots and more makeup than clothes, they're a visual draw for those not already occupied with a partner.

If you're not dancing or drinking, there's little interest in conversation, especially with a reporter.

Larry's and other nearby bars have drawn neighbors' ire because of after-bar fights, reports of underage drinking and fire-code violations.

Owner Larry Culp says his club is being unfairly targeted because he caters primarily to Blacks.
"It's a cultural issue here," said Culp, who has owned the bar since 1986.

To try and keep the peace, Culp employs at least seven security guards in and around the bar. On Saturday, some calmly escorted several people out of the nightclub.

Culp has also tried rolling closures, cutting off music and alcohol early and now is considering increasing lighting around the area.

"My response to any and all accusations is to try and do the right thing," he said.

However, residents worry newspaper headlines about the disturbances are feeding the public's negative image of Pioneer Square as an unsafe area.

"I think it creates a perception that is not at all accurate and probably makes people think twice about coming into the neighborhood at any time of day or night," Aaron says. "Based on what I've read, I wouldn't come down here at two o'clock in the morning."

Pioneer Square's Jekyll-and-Hyde nature is nothing new to the city.

Settled in 1852, the neighborhood was the nation's first Skid Row, so named for the logs that slid down toward the docks, and has always attracted people from both sides of the economic divide.

Early on, timber, salmon and coal helped build the economy and the district prospered and development soared.
In the 20th century, after sawmills were gone and downtown businesses moved north, the down-and-out urban area was frequented by street drunks and transients.

"The district has been schizophrenic since the late 1960s," said Walt Crowley, a Seattle historian and director of HistoryLink.org, a state historical Web site.

Buildings were restored after the Pioneer Square Historic District was established around 1970 and the neighborhood was transformed with music clubs, loft apartments and upscale taverns.

The Kingdome, built in 1976, periodically flooded the district with tens of thousands of sometimes rowdy baseball and football fans. The Dome's gone, but fans still flock to the stadiums that replaced it.

The most serious incident in the area's modern incarnation came in 2001, when Mardi Gras celebrations turned violent. Several thousand revelers jammed the streets, fighting, throwing beer bottles and smashing windows as police stood by. A 20-year-old man was killed by a blindside punch as he tried to help a woman who had fallen.

Worried that the district may again be disintegrating, community leaders and local law enforcement hope to put more of a nighttime shine on the neighborhood.

This past week, Mayor Greg Nickels responded to the Hamlin assault by calling for a task force of club owners, residents and business owners and an ongoing assessment program of nightclubs throughout the city.
"A vibrant night life shouldn't mean a violent night life," Nickels said.

— The Associated Press

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