09 01 2014
  12:42 am  
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Un Report: Afghan Civilian Casualties Rise

Pregnant woman killed for adultery but the man involved goes free

A UN report says civilian casualties in Afghanistan have risen by 31 percent, because of Taliban tactics. But Taliban spokesmen reject responsibility for cases such as that of Aisha, the 18-year-old woman whose face was mutilated when she tried to leave her husband's home, and Bibi Sanubar, a pregnant widow killed yesterday after being accused of adultery.


Read more: Un Report: Afghan Civilian Casualties Rise

Time Magazine Cover Links War to Afghan Women's Struggle

Aisha's maimed face is a symbol of Taliban violence

The face on the cover of Time magazine is graceful, composed and unthinkably maimed. The heart-shaped hole where 18-year-old Aisha's nose should be is a mark of Taliban justice — a visceral illustration, the headline suggests, of "what happens if we leave Afghanistan."
The portrait has quickly become a symbol of the stakes of a nearly decade-old war.


Read more: Time Magazine Cover Links War to Afghan Women's Struggle

Video: Wyclef Jean Talks Finances and His Bid for Haiti's Presidency

After the hip-hop party was over, newly minted presidential candidate Wyclef Jean sat down to talk business -- promoting Haiti's and defending his own.
The potential front-runner in Haiti's Nov. 28 election told The Associated Press that he supports the U.S. and U.N. vision for rebuilding Haiti's economy after its magnitude-7 earthquake -- a plan that encourages private investment in factories, agriculture and other areas.


Read more: Video: Wyclef Jean Talks Finances and His Bid for Haiti's Presidency

Dutch Troops Leave Afghanistan

First NATO member withdraws troops from unpopular war

The Netherlands became the first NATO country to end its combat mission in Afghanistan, withdrawing nearly 1,900 Dutch troops Sunday. Canada has announced it will withdraw its 2,700 troops in 2011 and Polish President Bronislaw Komorowski has promised to pull out his country's 2,600 soldiers the year after. The move is politically significant because it comes at a time of rising casualties and growing doubts about the war in NATO capitals, even as allied troops are beginning what could be the decisive campaign of the war.


Read more: Dutch Troops Leave Afghanistan

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