12-11-2016  5:52 am      •     
In this Jan. 28, 2016 photo, Joe Heflin, left, of Jefferson City, waits with others for his turn to receive free groceries from the Samaritan Center food pantry in Jefferson City, Mo. Heflin, 33, also receives federally funded food stamp benefits. He is among the more than 1 million people nationwide whose food stamps could end in three months if he doesn’t meet work requirements or receive a disability exemption. (AP Photo/David A. Lieb)

The federal government ended statewide work waivers this year for certain adults receiving aid through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, sometimes referred to as food stamps. In some cases, states were able to retain work waivers for certain counties or cities where there are higher unemployment rates and fewer available jobs.
Here's a state-by-state look at the number of able-bodied adults ages 18 through 49 without dependents who became subject to work requirements this year because of the end of statewide waivers. In most cases, the work requirements kicked in Jan. 1. Benefits will be cut off after three months if people do not comply with the work rules or receive exemptions.
ALABAMA
People affected: About 44,000. Local work waivers remain in 13 of the state's 67 counties.
ALASKA
People affected: About 3,000 in Anchorage. Work waivers remain for the rest of the state.
ARIZONA
People affected: About 33,500. That includes 21,000 in Maricopa County on Jan. 1; 11,000 in Pima County on April 1; and 1,500 in Yavapai County on July 1. Work waivers remain elsewhere.
ARKANSAS
People affected: About 31,300. No local work waivers.
CONNECTICUT
People affected: About 3,650. Work waivers are ending in 87 towns but will remain in 82 others.
FLORIDA
People affected: About 300,000. No local work waivers.
GEORGIA
People affected: About 6,100 in the suburban Atlanta counties of Cobb, Gwinnett and Hall. Work requirements don't apply in the rest of the state.
IDAHO
People affected: none. Although Idaho technically lost its federal statewide work waiver this month, the state has been imposing work requirements since late 2011.
KENTUCKY
People affected: About 17,500 in eight counties. Local work waivers remain the state's other 112 counties.
MARYLAND
People affected: About 15,400 in six counties. Work requirements don't apply in the rest of the counties or the city of Baltimore.
MASSACHUSETTS
People affected: About 23,000. Local work waivers remain in some areas.
MISSISSIPPI
People affected: About 75,000. No local work waivers.
MISSOURI
People affected: About 60,000. No local work waivers.
NEW JERSEY
People affected: About 11,000. No local work waivers.
NEW MEXICO
People affected: About 24,000. Local work waivers remain in nearly one third of the counties and for Native American tribes.
NEW YORK
People affected: About 51,000. Local work waivers remain in most of New York City, 16 counties and seven other cities.
NORTH CAROLINA
People affected: About 110,000, including about half Jan. 1 and the other half July 1. No local work waivers will remain.
OREGON
People affected: About 9,600 in the Portland area. Work waivers remain for the rest of the state.
PENNSYLVANIA
People affected: About 48,000, starting March 1. Local work waivers will remain in 24 of the state's 67 counties and in 12 cities, including Philadelphia.
TENNESSEE
People affected: About 150,000. No local work waivers.
WASHINGTON
People affected: About 36,000 in the Seattle area. Work waivers remain in the rest of the state.
WEST VIRGINIA
People affected: About 27,000 in nine counties. Work waivers remain in the rest of the state.

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