05 29 2015
  1:14 am  
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40 Years of Service
Statewide, more than 12 percent of children have no health care

Of Oregon's children who could qualify for privately or publicly funded health care, 25 percent — or 117,000 — are still going without health insurance, according to a survey conducted by a family physician from Oregon Health & Science University.


Conducted by Dr. Jen DeVoe, the survey of low-income families enrolled in Oregon's food stamp program determined that the percentage of children without health insurance has risen from 10.1 percent in 2002 to 12.3 percent in 2004.
"Twenty-five percent of eligible children without coverage is quite a staggering number, especially when they qualify for coverage," DeVoe said. "We have existing programs that we think are covering these children, but they aren't covered. There's a lot of work to be done."


Low-income children most likely to go without health insurance are Hispanic, aged 14 and older and in families whose income approached the higher end of the low-income threshold. In some cases, they had an employed but uninsured parent.


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