04-25-2018  1:29 pm      •     
The Skanner Report

Northwest News

After four years of planning and renovation, Portland Center Stage welcomes Portlanders to a community celebration of its new home, The Gerding Theater at the Armory.
To commemorate the rebirth of this 115-year-old Portland fixture, Portland Center Stage and Portland Family of Funds are hosting a street party from noon to 5 p.m. Oct. 1 on Northwest Davis Street between Ninth and 11th avenues. Admission is free; food and beverages will be available at modest prices.


READ MORE

The Rev. Ellis H. Casson, left, has a word with James Kelly, CEO of the Seattle Metropolitan Urban League, at the seventh annual Tabor 100 Captains of Industry Gala, held Sept. 16 at the  Washington Trade and Convention Center. Kelly was one of six people presented with the Crystal Eagle Leadership Award by the Tabor 100.


READ MORE

State facing chronic prison shortage due to repeat offenders

OLYMPIA—Many of the roughly 9,000 inmates released from the state's prisons each year re-offend and get locked up again. Though it's not a problem unique to Washington, the state's secretary of corrections says he plans to push for reforms designed to reduce the number of repeat offenders.
"We know how to lock people up, know how to incapacitate," said Harold Clarke. "But for me, the true measure of public protection is what the individual does after release. Because then the public becomes vulnerable."
Clarke's wish list includes revamping prison psychological assessments, education, job-training and treatment programs. "If we can help prop them up — prepare them — I think most of these folks will choose law-abiding lives," he said.


READ MORE

Prostate cancer more likely to strike Black men; early detection is key

Men who might be worried about prostate cancer have a solution: "Let's Talk About It."
African American men have the highest rate of prostate cancer in the country and are more likely to die of the disease than are men of any other race. The "Let's Talk About It" campaign is meant to raise awareness about prostate cancer in the Seattle area.


READ MORE

Critics worry changes would erode public confidence in government

Under a proposal supported by Mayor Greg Nickels, Seattle's ethics code would be relaxed for members of 29 advisory boards, from the Planning Commission to the Marijuana Policy Review Panel. The Seattle Ethics and Elections Commission also supports the proposal. "It's a balancing act," said Bob Mahon, a commission member. Nickels and commission members point out the volunteer panels were created to advise city officials and don't have the final vote on any issues.


READ MORE

Edward P. Jones, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "The Known World," answers questions after reading from his new collection of stories, "All Aunt Hagar's Children," Sept. 18 at the Central Library in Downtown Seattle.


READ MORE

NEW YORK—National Urban League President Marc Morial last week expressed strong opposition to U.S. House legislation requiring voters to show proof of citizenship to register to vote and then provide government-issued photo identification to cast ballots in the 2006 general elections and beyond.


READ MORE

The Seattle Seahawks are off to a 2-0 start after a 21-10 win over the Arizona Cardinals Sunday afternoon at Qwest Field in front of the largest crowd ever for a Seattle home opener.
The defense rolled over the Cardinals offense, with five different Seahawk players sacking Cardinals' quarterback Kurt Warner.


READ MORE

Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast

Every year, we award several thousand dollars in scholarships to worthy students who have demonstrated their desire for self-improvement through education. We also present two awards (The Drum Major Award and The John Jackson award) to individuals, community organizations, or businesses that continue Dr. King's work for civil rights in their community. During the past 20 years, over $220,000 has been contributed to the community for educational growth.


READ MORE

Oregon is taking another stab at joining the handful of states being allowed to pilot a new way of measuring student progress under the No Child Left Behind federal education law.
Only North Carolina and Tennessee have so far been tapped for the pilot program, which tracks how individual students perform in math and reading over time, known as a "growth model."
Oregon's initial proposal was rejected this spring, but state education officials say they've altered it to address concerns raised by federal officials.
Education officials in Oregon have been keen on growth models for months, saying that tracking test scores of individual students gives a far better pictures of how much progress schools and classroom teachers are making.
Under the current system, schools must compare the scores of different groups of kids from one year to the next -- the performance of this year's third-graders, for example, will be measured against their counterparts from last year.


READ MORE

Recently Published by The Skanner News

  • Default
  • Title
  • Date
  • Random
load morehold SHIFT key to load allload all
Oregon Lottery
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

The Skanner Report