02-19-2017  10:49 am      •     
LELO

PHOTO: Sean Bagsby, President of the Seattle IBEW and Ted Thomas President of the Coalition of Black Trade Unionists attend LELO's 43rd Anniversary  Dinner, Saturday Oct. 18 at Southside Commons.  LELO, Legacy of Equality, Leadership and Organizing was formed in 1973 by a coalition of labor groups to fight for racial and economic justice for workers. Photo by Susan Fried

 

Washington CAN Social Justice Breakfast

Seats are filling up at Washington CAN!’s annual Social Justice Awards Breakfast, Nov. 18 at 7:30 a.m.., Seattle Machinists’ Hall, 9125 – 15th Place S.

This year’s honorees include Molly Neitzel, Chettie McAfee, Betsy Andrews, Josélito Lopez and Bonnie Roberts. Keynote speaker is former New York Times columnist and author, Bob Herbert, currently a Distinguished Senior Fellow at Demos which combines research, policy, development and advocacy to influence public debate and catalyze progressive change. 

More information at www.washingtoncan.org.

 

Voter Registration Deadline Monday for General Election

Not registered to vote in Washington? You have until Oct. 27 to register in person at King County Elections so that you can participate in the Nov. 4 general election.

For in-person registration, go to King County Elections, 919 SW Grady Way, Renton, 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. weekdays.

Or, the Voter Registration Annex, King County Administration Building, 500 4th Avenue, Room 440, Seattle, 8:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. or 2 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. weekdays.

To register to vote, you must be: A citizen of the United States; a legal resident of Washington State; at least 18 years old by Election Day; not disqualified from voting due to a court order; and; not under Department of Corrections supervision for a Washington felony conviction.

King County mailed ballots for the general election on Oct. 15. If you are a registered voter in King County and haven’t received yours, call 206-296-VOTE (8683) right away.

Get the latest Elections news and updates online: www.kingcounty.gov/elections; on Facebook: www.facebook.com/kingcountyelections; or Twitter: @kcelections.

 

Green Kent Day Oct. 25

Volunteers are invited to join the Green Kent Partnership (GKP) Saturday, Oct. 25, from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. for a fun-filled morning of restoration work and community camaraderie in celebration of the third annual Green Kent Day, a celebration of the GKP’s work restoring over 1,300 acres of publicly owned forests and natural areas.

All are welcome and no experience is necessary for participation in restoration and planting projects. Volunteers are needed at both the Green River Natural Resources Area, located just north of 22306 Russell Rd., and at Morrill Meadows Park, 10600 SE 248th.

A barbecue lunch at that site will be provided at noon to both volunteer groups, thanks to generous support from Farrington Court. Registration is required at www.kentwa.gov/ComeVolunteer.
Read more at www.forterra.org/greencities.

 

The Seattle Public Library Hosts 'Sharing Our Stories' Series 

Immerse yourself in the art and craft of storytelling this fall with performances, workshops and interactive audience participation at several locations of The Seattle Public Library. There's something for everyone to try out: traditional oral storytelling, radio scripts, personal storytelling, a documentary film, autobiographical comics and more.

The workshops are free and open to the public. Registration is not required for most events. Free parking is available at the branches.

See below for the workshop schedule and descriptions or visit the Sharing Our Stories page.

CHILDREN

Campfire Songs and Stories
Join local singer-songwriter Nancy Stewart for a fun-filled evening with a new twist on an old tradition! Sing songs, share stories and make your own s’mores. For all ages. 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 28 at the Northgate Branch, 10548 Fifth Ave. N.E., 206-386-1980.

Teasin' Pleasin' Tales: Stories to Delight and Treasure
Debra Harris-Branham will tell animated and participatory folktales from around the world, with a special focus on African and African-American tales. For all ages. 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 8 at the University Branch, 5009 Roosevelt Way N.E., 206-684-4063.

TEENS

RadioActive: A two-day journalism workshop
Over a two-day period, teens will record and edit audio, write a script and record their voices in KUOW’s professional studios. Plan to attend both days. For ages 13 to 19. Registration is required; call 206-684-4063 to sign up.
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 25 at the University Branch, 5009 Roosevelt Way N.E., 206-684-4063.
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 26 at the KUOW Studio, 4518 University Way NE, Suite 310.

'Invisible Young' Film Screening & Panel Discussion
Watch an award-winning documentary film about four young adults, all of whom lived on the Seattle streets as teenagers. After the film, stay for a panel discussion featuring director Steve Keller along with homeless and formerly-homeless youth. For teens and adults.
1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 9 at the University Branch, 5009 Roosevelt Way N.E., 206-684-4063.

Your Mostly True, 100% Awesome Story: A Comics Workshop
Create a mini-comic based on your own true story with the help of local comic book artist, David Lasky. For ages 12 to 19.
5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 12 at the Lake City Branch, 12501 28th Ave. N.E., 206-684-7518.

ADULTS

Seattle Storytellers Guild
Join Cynthia Westby and the Seattle Storytellers Guild for a brief introduction to the art of storytelling, then listen to experienced storytellers or share your own story.
6 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 9 at the Northgate Branch, 10548 Fifth Ave. N.E., 206-386-1980.

Family History Storytelling
Every family has interesting stories. Learn how to tell them in this innovative workshop presented by Mahina Oshie, genealogy librarian.
6 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 22 at the Northeast Branch, 6801 35th Ave. N.E., 206-684-7539

Storytelling with Fresh Ground Stories
Join Paul Currington and Fresh Ground Stories for an afternoon celebrating true, first-person storytelling inspired by The Moth Radio Hour. The story theme will be: Lessons Learned.
3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 1 at the University Branch, 5009 Roosevelt Way N.E., 206-684-4063.
This program series is presented in partnership with KUOW, the Burke Museum, Seattle Storyteller’s Guild, Fresh Ground Stories and The Seattle Public Library Foundation.

For more information, call the Library at 206-386-4636, visit Sharing Our Stories or www.spl.org.

 

Senior Services Training: Oct. 24 Improving Aging Services for LGBTQ Elders

Senior Services is offering a one-day training session, Improving Aging Services for LGBTQ Elders, based on the curriculum set by the National Resource Center on LGBT Aging (NRC). The training is targeted toward social/community workers or others involved in social outreach and networking person who would like to improve their own engagement with the LGBTQ elder community. Anyone interested in the topic is welcome to participate.

Serving LGBTQ Elders is Oct. 24, 8 a.m. -5 p.m., Senior Services, Lillian Rice Building, 2208 Second Avenue, Seattle.

To register, send an email to trainingreg@seniorservices.org, (include dietary exclusions with registration), or write to Marxa Marnia, M.E.S., Staff Training and Development Coordinator, 206.268.6705, marxam@seniorservices.org.

 

4th Annual Sound Living - A One Day Communiversity

A One Day Communiversity on Saturday, Oct. 25 at Everett Community College from 9 a.m.– 4 p.m.. This “Communiversity” is a day of learning for everyone. Attendees will be able to explore the connections between land, water and the people of Snohomish County with 19 presentation options during the day.

Attendees will have a chance to select from sessions as diverse as “Orca Tribes of the Salish Sea” to “What is Biochar?” All sessions are led by experts in their field who will share the latest information available. You don’t need to be a scientist to attend – the ‘communiversity’ is for everyone.

David Dilgard, History Specialist with Everett Public Libraries, presents the keynote session on Port Gardner and Beyond – A Place Across Centuries and Cultures. He will set the tone for Sound Living 2014 by delving into the growth and development of Snohomish County and the waters that adjoin it, from prehistory through the present. He will attempt to describe the ways in which the patterns of early settlement were shaped by the waters and waterways and how those natural patterns were subsequently shaped by settlement and development. In many cases the consequences of patterns that commenced long ago are very much with us today.

On-line registration closes on October 18, but registration, with cash or check, at the door is welcome.

For more information call 425-357-6028, or check the website at www.wsusoundliving.org

 

HealthFest Offers Health and Wellness Options for Individuals and their Families

The first ever HealthFest at Seattle Center offers a broad range of free information and services for individuals and their families to help them achieve healthier lives, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 25 – 26, in Seattle Center Armory.

The two-day resource fair welcomes the whole community to connect with local health, human, and social service providers – over 40 exhibitors and presenters in all.

HealthFest offers free flu shots, health screenings and emergency preparedness tips. Participants may find help in navigating health insurance, collect valuable nutritional and fitness ideas, and join in discussions on health and wellness.

Seminars that empower individuals to develop more mindful eating patterns such as preparation of unfamiliar local winter vegetables, health impacts of processed foods, and tips on deciphering food labeling.

More information on HealthFest, as well as the Seattle/King County Clinic, is available at www.seattlecenter.org or by calling 206-684-7200.

 

King County 8th Graders Essay Contest on Legacy of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 

The King County Civil Rights Commission invites all 8th grade students throughout the county to participate in the Commission's 16th annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Essay Writing Contest and present their ideas on Dr. King's legacy of peace and justice.

The Essay Contest is open to all 8th grade students in King County. Three essays will receive prizes. First, second, and third prize winners will win trophies and a commemorative Dr. King pin.
Participants must submit an essay that focuses on the theme of the County's 28th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration, set to take place on Thursday, Jan. 15, 2015 in downtown Seattle.

This year's theme is:

"So long as I do not firmly and irrevocably possess the right to vote I do not possess myself. I cannot make up my mind — it is made up for me. I cannot live as a democratic citizen, observing the laws I have helped to enact — I can only submit to the edict of others."

All essays must be postmarked by Friday, Nov. 7, 2014 and mailed to: King County Civil Rights Commission, 401 Fifth Ave., Suite 135, Seattle, WA 98104. For more information and full list of rules, contact Paula Harris-White, Department of Executive Services Equity and Social Justice Manager, at 206-263-2444.

 

The Seattle Public Library Presents Richard Blanco's New Memoir Nov. 10

The 2014 Seattle Reads author Richard Blanco will read from his new, full-length memoir about growing up in Miami as the gay son of Cuban immigrants from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 10 at the Broadway Performance Hall of Seattle Central College, 1625 Broadway Seattle, 98122. (206-934-3052.)

In Blanco's memoir, "The Prince of Los Cocuyos: A Miami Childhood," he explores his coming-of-age in a Cuban immigrant family and his attempts to understand his place in America while grappling with his burgeoning artistic and sexual identities.

Blanco was born in Madrid in 1968 and immigrated as an infant with his Cuban-exile family to the United States. He was raised and educated in Miami, earning a B.S. in civil engineering and a M.F.A. in creative writing from Florida International University. Blanco is practicing civil engineer, writer and poet, and teacher. His book "For All of Us, One Today: An Inaugural Poet’s Journey" was the featured work for the Library’s 2014 Seattle Reads series.

Library events and programs are free and everyone is welcome. Registration is not required. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. Parking is available in nearby commercial lots and on the street.
For more information, call the Library at 206-386-4636 or Ask A Librarian.

 

Find more news and events in Portland and Seattle on The Skanner News Community Calendar

 

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  • WASHINGTON (AP) — One month after the inauguration, the stretch of Pennsylvania Avenue in front of Donald Trump's White House still is a hard-hat zone. Skeletal remains of the inaugural reviewing stands poke skyward. Random piles of plywood and cables are heaped on the ground inside crooked lines of metal fencing. The disarray outside the president's front door, though not his fault, serves as a metaphor for the tumult still unfolding inside. Four weeks in, the man who says he inherited "a mess" at home and abroad is presiding over a White House that is widely described as itself being a mess. At a stunning pace, Trump has riled world leaders and frustrated allies. He was dealt a bruising legal blow on one of his signature policies. He lost his national security adviser and his pick for labor secretary to scandal. He's seen forces within his government push back against his policies and leak confidential information. All of this has played out amid a steady drip of revelations about an FBI investigation into his campaign's contacts with Russian intelligence officials. Trump says his administration is running like a "fine-tuned machine." He points to the rising stock market and the devotion of his still-loyal supporters as evidence that all is well, although his job approval rating is much lower than that for prior presidents in their first weeks in office. Stung by the unrelenting criticism coming his way, Trump dismisses much of it as "fake news" delivered by "the enemy of the people" — aka the press. Daily denunciations of the media are just one of the new White House fixtures Americans are adjusting to. Most days start (and end) with presidential tweets riffing off of whatever's on TV talk shows or teasing coming events or hurling insults at the media. At some point in the day, count on Trump to cast back to the marvels of his upset of Democrat Hillary Clinton in the November election and quite possibly overstate his margins of support. Expect more denunciations of the "dishonest" press and its "fake news." From there, things can veer in unexpected directions as Trump offers up policy pronouncements or offhand remarks that leave even White House aides struggling to interpret them. The long-standing U.S. policy of seeking a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? Trump this past week offered this cryptic pronouncement: "I'm looking at two-state and one-state, and I like the one that both parties like. I can live with either one." His U.N. ambassador, Nikki Haley, the next day insisted, "We absolutely support a two-state solution." Trump's days are busy. Outside groups troop in for "listening sessions." Foreign leaders call or come to visit. (Or, in the case of Mexico's president, cancel out in pique over Trump's talk about the planned border wall.) After the president signed two dozen executive actions, the White House was awaiting a rush order of more of the gold-plated Cross pens that Trump prefers to the chrome-plated ones used by his predecessor. Trump hands them out as souvenirs at the signing ceremonies that he points to as evidence of his ambitious pace. "This last month has represented an unprecedented degree of action on behalf of the great citizens of our country," Trump said at a Thursday news conference. "Again, I say it. There has never been a presidency that's done so much in such a short period of time." That's all music to the ears of his followers, who sent him to Washington to upend the established order and play the role of disrupter. "I can't believe there's actually a politician doing what he says he would do," says an approving Scott Hiltgen, a 66-year-old office furniture sales broker from River Falls, Wisconsin. "That never happens." Disrupt Trump has. But there may be more sound and fury than substance to many of his early actions. Trump did select Judge Neil Gorsuch to replace the late Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court, a nomination that has drawn strong reviews from conservatives. But the president is regrouping on immigration after federal judges blocked his order to suspend the United States' refugee program and ban visitors from seven Muslim-majority countries, which had caused chaos for travelers around the globe. Some other orders on issues such as the U.S.-Mexico border wall and former President Barack Obama's health care law are of limited effect. Trump says his early actions show he means to deliver on the promises he made during the campaign. "A lot of people say, 'Oh, oh, Trump was only kidding with the wall,'" the president told a group of police chiefs recently. "I wasn't kidding. I don't kid." But the Republican-led Congress is still waiting to see specifics on how Trump wants to proceed legislatively on top initiatives such as replacing the health care law, enacting tax cuts and revising trade deals. The messy rollout of the travel ban and tumult over the ouster of national security adviser Michael Flynn for misrepresenting his contacts with Russia are part of a broader state of disarray as different figures in Trump's White House jockey for power and leaks reveal internal discord in the machinations of the presidency. "I thought by now you'd at least hear the outlines of domestic legislation like tax cuts," says Princeton historian Julian Zelizer. "But a lot of that has slowed. Trump shouldn't mistake the fact that some of his supporters like his style with the fact that a lot of Republicans just want the policies he promised them. He has to deliver that." Put Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., in the camp of those more interested in substance than style. "I'm not a great fan of daily tweets," McConnell said Friday, referring to the "extra discussion" that Trump likes to engage in. But McConnell was quick to add: "What I am a fan of is what he's been actually doing." He credits Trump with assembling a conservative Cabinet and taking steps to reduce government regulation, and promised: "We like his positions and we're going to pursue them as vigorously as we can." The challenge may be to tease out exactly what Trump wants in the way of a health care plan, tax changes and trade policy. At his long and defiant news conference on Thursday, Trump tried to dispel the impression of a White House in crisis, squarely blaming the press for keeping him from moving forward more decisively on his agenda. Pointing to his chief of staff, Reince Priebus, Trump said, "You take a look at Reince, he's working so hard just putting out fires that are fake fires. I mean, they're fake. They're not true. And isn't that a shame because he'd rather be working on health care, he'd rather be working on tax reform." For all the frustrations of his early days as president, Trump still seems tickled by the trappings of his office. When New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie visited the White House last week to discuss the national opioid epidemic over lunch, the governor said Trump informed him: "Chris, you and I are going to have the meatloaf.'" Trump added: "I'm telling you, the meatloaf is fabulous." ___Follow Nancy Benac on Twitter at http://twitter.com/nbenac
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