02-19-2017  1:32 pm      •     
Kshama Sawant at demonstration

Photo: Sawant joined hundreds of people in Seattle last month to march from Judkins Park to Seattle Central Community College to show their support for a $15 minimum wage for Seattle workers.  

Flash Mob to Celebrate Portland Trailblazers

Entrepreneur Andre Miller is organizing a flash mob to celebrate the Portland Trailblazers success this season.

Portland entrepreneur Andre Miller is organizing a flash mob to celebrate the Portland Trailblazers success this season. The event will be filmed. The Blazers are 53-28 putting them second in the Northwest Division, and setting them up for a run at the post-season playoffs.

Fans are invited to join the crowd, 3 p.m. Saturday April 19 at Lloyd Center Mall ice skating rink, and sing join upcoming artist Yung Jordan in singing his anthem, “Welcome to RipCity.” 

Cheer, dance and be part of a video celebrating Portland’s beloved basketball heroes. And if you need some fan gear, Miller will be offering special discounts on his line of Blazer Gang apparel. Find it in the LloydCenter or online.

Seattle City Councilor Kshama Sawant in Portland for $15 Wage Campaign

Kshama Sawant, a socialist elected last year to the Seattle City Council, speaks in Portland, Thursday, April 24, 6:30 p.m., at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 1624 NE Hancock St, Portland, on the 15 Now campaign to raise Seattle’s minimum wage to $15 an hour. Other speakers include Portland City Council candidate Nick Caleb and labor organizer and author, Ahjamu Umi. This event is a fundraiser for Kshama Sawant's campaign. Suggested donation is $15, but no one will be turned away.
For more information on the campaign go to www.15now.org .

STASHA Hosts Substance-Free Party for Middle-, High-Schoolers

Strong Teens Against Substance Hazards and Abuse will hold a drug- and alcohol-free party late this month for ClarkCounty middle- and high-school students.

STASHA is a peer educator program. Members are 12-19 and work to prevent substance abuse among youth and in the community. Some members have never used drugs or alcohol, others have experimented and still others have completed treatment and are now in recovery.

The group is part of the Clark County Youth House within the Department of Community Services.

The party is scheduled for 8-11 p.m. on Friday, April 25, at the MarshallCommunity Center, 1009 E. McLoughlin Blvd.

Food is free. Bring a bathing suit and 25 cents for a locker if you want to swim. Other activities include basketball, volleyball, dancing with a live DJ and video and table games.

For more information go to www.clark.wa.gov.

Workforce Conferences Target 50-and-Older Crowd

PortlandCommunity College is hosting two conferences on employment and training aimed at the 50-and-older crowd.

The half-day conferences titled, “Finding Work at 50 Plus: Yes You Can!” are set to go from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., Tuesday, April 22, in Beaverton at the Willow Creek Center (241 S.W. Edgeway Dr.) and again on Thursday, April 24, at the Portland Metro Workforce Training Center (5600 N.E. 42nd Ave). The free conferences are for members of AARP who are age 50 or older. The purpose is to give information, offer networking opportunities and help create a “next steps plan” for AARP members on employment and training options targeted specifically for their age group. In addition to PCC, AARP and the Small Business Administration are co-sponsoring the events.

The conferences, which are co-sponsored by AARP and the Small Business Administration, will feature workshops on how attendees can run their own business, learn more about solo entrepreneurship, take advantage of the hidden job market, re-careering, and discover specific tools and techniques on finding employment. Keynote speakers include Kevin Cahill with ECON Northwest and Malcolm Boswell from Oregon State Employment. Both will present data on the 50-plus workforce to show where the jobs are, employment trends and data on entrepreneurship. Panel speakers will talk about how they have re-created their lives.

Organizations providing information at the conferences include PCC’s Small Business Development and CLIMB centers as well as the college’s Career Pathways, Community Education and Life by Design programs. Plus, SCORE, Mercy Corps, Small Business Administration, Worksystems Inc., Experience Works, Easter Seals of Oregon, AARP and Dress For Success will also be on hand.

To register, call toll free at (877) 926-8300.       

WSU Vancouver Hosts Discussion on Proposed Copper Mine Near Mt. St. Helens

The WashingtonStateUniversityVancouverCenter for Social and Environmental Justice and the Gifford Pinchot Task Force will host author Bill Carter who will talk about a proposed copper mine near Mount St. Helens. The lecture will be held at 6:30 p.m. April 23 in the DengerinkAdministrationBuilding, Room 110. The event is free and open to the public.
Carter wrote "Boom, Bust, Boom - A Story About Copper, the Metal that Runs the World." The book is an account of the presence of copper in our lives and its cost on health, the economy and the environment. Carter was poisoned by vegetables grown in his family garden, contaminated with invisible pollutants from a once prosperous copper mining industry. His experience sent him on an international discovery mission to learn more about what he describes as the most important metal in modern society.
The Canadian company Ascot Resources Ltd. has begun exploratory drilling 12 miles from the crater of Mount St. Helens in the Green River watershed, which provides clean drinking water to Southwest Washington communities.
For more information go to www.vancouver.wsu.edu.

Congolese Project Slideshow

Portland artist and printmaker Roger Peet recently returned from the Democratic Republic of Congo, where he coordinated a project of conservation theater with Congolese scientists and artists. The project toured remote villages by bicycle.

Peet presents images, music, video and stories from the project April 29, 7:30 p.m. at the Alleyway Bar, 2415 NE Alberta St.

Peet wrote and directed several short skits, made elaborate masks, and documented the project through photography, video, and audio recording. The performances took place in seven villages near the proposed LomamiNational Park, in a region of high insecurity menaced by warlords, poachers, and renegade elements of Congo's national army.

More about the project at www.lomamibandanas.tumblr.com/.

Training to Help Chefs Keep the Flavor, Cut The Salt

A free culinary training on strategies to enhance flavor and reduce sodium is to chefs from locally owned, independent restaurants in ClarkCounty, Tuesday April 29, 9 – 11 a.m. atClarkCollegeColumbiaTechCenter, 18700 SE Mill Plain Blvd., in the Cooking School Kitchen.

The instructor is Chef Garrett Berdan, a registered dietitian who offers culinary workshops for professional cooks across the country. Garrett has been recognized by the White House as a “Champion of Change” and is past president of the Oregon Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Registration is required; please contact melissa.martin@clark.wa.gov or 360-397-8000 ext. 7291.

Mount Hood Emergency Preparedness Expo May 2-3

The bi-annual Mount Hood Emergency Preparedness Expo will be held Friday-Saturday, May 2-3 at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Boring at12300 S.E. 312th Ave. The event is free and open to the pubic.

The expo, which will feature more than 60 workshops and 30 displays, will run from 11:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Friday, May 2, and from 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, May 3.

This community event, designed to help local residents prepare for a disaster, will feature a wide variety of workshops including first aid, fire safety, financial planning, food storage, firearm safety, organic gardening, bee keeping, and more.

Visitors will receive free hands-on training and resources from local experts and professionals in emergency preparedness, disaster management, and self-reliance.

Portland State University Geology Professor and widely known speaker, Dr. Scott Burns, will deliver a keynote address at 2:00 pm Saturday, May 3, about the scientific evidence of an impending major earthquake in the Pacific Northwest.

For more information, contact event chairperson Patti Paxson at 971-645-6847 or by email atpaxson2000@hotmail.com.

The Rosewood Initiative Mother's Day Market

The Rosewood Initiative Mother's Day Market will be on Saturday May 3, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. inside The Rosewood Initiative building located at16126 SE Stark Street, Portland.

The event is free and open to the public allowing shoppers the opportunity to find the right gift for mom or spend some quality time together. If you're looking for an opportunity to support local artisans and try delicious food, The Rosewood Initiative Mother's Day Market is just the place.
The Rosewood Initiative is a non-profit organization dedicated to making the Rosewood area a desirable place to live, work and play.

For more information about The Rosewood Initiative or The Rosewood Initiative Mother's Day Market you can contact them on the web at rosewoodinitiative.org or call 503-208-2562.

Commissioners seek applicants for Board of Equalization vacancies

The Board of County Commissioners is seeking applicants to fill two seats on the Clark County Board of Equalization.

One position is for a full-term board member, and one is for an alternate to serve on an on-call basis. Terms are for three years.
The board provides an impartial citizen forum in which property owners can resolve issues of assessed valuation and exemptions. Members are paid $75 per day while attending meetings. Meetings usually are Tuesday through Thursday and scheduled during regular business hours, as needed.
Applicants should have knowledge of real and personal property, Clark County, property appraisal techniques and property tax law. Experience or education in the building trades also is helpful.
Applicants should submit a letter of interest and resume to Jennifer Clark, Board of County Commissioners, P.O. Box 5000, Vancouver, WA 98666-5000 or email jennifer.clark@clark.wa.gov.

Deadline is 5 p.m. Wednesday, May 7.

To learn more, visit www.clark.wa.gov/board-of-equalization/index.html.

For more Portland events check out The Skanner News community calendar

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  • WASHINGTON (AP) — One month after the inauguration, the stretch of Pennsylvania Avenue in front of Donald Trump's White House still is a hard-hat zone. Skeletal remains of the inaugural reviewing stands poke skyward. Random piles of plywood and cables are heaped on the ground inside crooked lines of metal fencing. The disarray outside the president's front door, though not his fault, serves as a metaphor for the tumult still unfolding inside. Four weeks in, the man who says he inherited "a mess" at home and abroad is presiding over a White House that is widely described as itself being a mess. At a stunning pace, Trump has riled world leaders and frustrated allies. He was dealt a bruising legal blow on one of his signature policies. He lost his national security adviser and his pick for labor secretary to scandal. He's seen forces within his government push back against his policies and leak confidential information. All of this has played out amid a steady drip of revelations about an FBI investigation into his campaign's contacts with Russian intelligence officials. Trump says his administration is running like a "fine-tuned machine." He points to the rising stock market and the devotion of his still-loyal supporters as evidence that all is well, although his job approval rating is much lower than that for prior presidents in their first weeks in office. Stung by the unrelenting criticism coming his way, Trump dismisses much of it as "fake news" delivered by "the enemy of the people" — aka the press. Daily denunciations of the media are just one of the new White House fixtures Americans are adjusting to. Most days start (and end) with presidential tweets riffing off of whatever's on TV talk shows or teasing coming events or hurling insults at the media. At some point in the day, count on Trump to cast back to the marvels of his upset of Democrat Hillary Clinton in the November election and quite possibly overstate his margins of support. Expect more denunciations of the "dishonest" press and its "fake news." From there, things can veer in unexpected directions as Trump offers up policy pronouncements or offhand remarks that leave even White House aides struggling to interpret them. The long-standing U.S. policy of seeking a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? Trump this past week offered this cryptic pronouncement: "I'm looking at two-state and one-state, and I like the one that both parties like. I can live with either one." His U.N. ambassador, Nikki Haley, the next day insisted, "We absolutely support a two-state solution." Trump's days are busy. Outside groups troop in for "listening sessions." Foreign leaders call or come to visit. (Or, in the case of Mexico's president, cancel out in pique over Trump's talk about the planned border wall.) After the president signed two dozen executive actions, the White House was awaiting a rush order of more of the gold-plated Cross pens that Trump prefers to the chrome-plated ones used by his predecessor. Trump hands them out as souvenirs at the signing ceremonies that he points to as evidence of his ambitious pace. "This last month has represented an unprecedented degree of action on behalf of the great citizens of our country," Trump said at a Thursday news conference. "Again, I say it. There has never been a presidency that's done so much in such a short period of time." That's all music to the ears of his followers, who sent him to Washington to upend the established order and play the role of disrupter. "I can't believe there's actually a politician doing what he says he would do," says an approving Scott Hiltgen, a 66-year-old office furniture sales broker from River Falls, Wisconsin. "That never happens." Disrupt Trump has. But there may be more sound and fury than substance to many of his early actions. Trump did select Judge Neil Gorsuch to replace the late Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court, a nomination that has drawn strong reviews from conservatives. But the president is regrouping on immigration after federal judges blocked his order to suspend the United States' refugee program and ban visitors from seven Muslim-majority countries, which had caused chaos for travelers around the globe. Some other orders on issues such as the U.S.-Mexico border wall and former President Barack Obama's health care law are of limited effect. Trump says his early actions show he means to deliver on the promises he made during the campaign. "A lot of people say, 'Oh, oh, Trump was only kidding with the wall,'" the president told a group of police chiefs recently. "I wasn't kidding. I don't kid." But the Republican-led Congress is still waiting to see specifics on how Trump wants to proceed legislatively on top initiatives such as replacing the health care law, enacting tax cuts and revising trade deals. The messy rollout of the travel ban and tumult over the ouster of national security adviser Michael Flynn for misrepresenting his contacts with Russia are part of a broader state of disarray as different figures in Trump's White House jockey for power and leaks reveal internal discord in the machinations of the presidency. "I thought by now you'd at least hear the outlines of domestic legislation like tax cuts," says Princeton historian Julian Zelizer. "But a lot of that has slowed. Trump shouldn't mistake the fact that some of his supporters like his style with the fact that a lot of Republicans just want the policies he promised them. He has to deliver that." Put Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., in the camp of those more interested in substance than style. "I'm not a great fan of daily tweets," McConnell said Friday, referring to the "extra discussion" that Trump likes to engage in. But McConnell was quick to add: "What I am a fan of is what he's been actually doing." He credits Trump with assembling a conservative Cabinet and taking steps to reduce government regulation, and promised: "We like his positions and we're going to pursue them as vigorously as we can." The challenge may be to tease out exactly what Trump wants in the way of a health care plan, tax changes and trade policy. At his long and defiant news conference on Thursday, Trump tried to dispel the impression of a White House in crisis, squarely blaming the press for keeping him from moving forward more decisively on his agenda. Pointing to his chief of staff, Reince Priebus, Trump said, "You take a look at Reince, he's working so hard just putting out fires that are fake fires. I mean, they're fake. They're not true. And isn't that a shame because he'd rather be working on health care, he'd rather be working on tax reform." For all the frustrations of his early days as president, Trump still seems tickled by the trappings of his office. When New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie visited the White House last week to discuss the national opioid epidemic over lunch, the governor said Trump informed him: "Chris, you and I are going to have the meatloaf.'" Trump added: "I'm telling you, the meatloaf is fabulous." ___Follow Nancy Benac on Twitter at http://twitter.com/nbenac
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