10-27-2016  3:47 pm      •     
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It's not unusual for small-business owners to find themselves in a financial pinch once in awhile. There's an unexpected emergency or a temporary downturn in sales. Or there's a need to expand, and the bank won't approve a loan for the entire amount needed.

To bridge that funding gap, small-businessoperators will be able to turn to the Portland Development Commission for loans through a new program soon to be offered to businesses in Portland's low-income neighborhoods.



When Pat DiPrima first started to think about opening an Italian bakery and café, she asked everyone for advice. But among the best suggestions she received was to check out the Business Outreach Program at Portland State University.

"They helped me tremendously," said DiPrima, whose DiPrima Dolci Italian Bakery and Café is a neighborhood gathering spot at 1936 N. Killingsworth St. "They did everything from helping me gather data to apply for loans, to advising me on marketing and advertising plans and employee issues.



Breaking ground for the East Side Big Pipe project were, from left, Bill Mariucci, Kiewit-Bilfinger Berger Project Director; Portland City Commissioner Sam Adams; Paul Gribbon, Willamette River CSO Tunnel Program Manager; and Dean Marriott, Environmental Services Director

While the city begins to bore a 5.5-mile tunnel 120 feet under Portland's east side, minority contractors should be sharpening their pencils to compete for at least $26 million in construction contracts.



Ronald Langston

WASHINGTON—Black-owned businesses are among the fastest-growing segments of the American economy, according to a report by the Census Bureau.

The number of Black-owned businesses grew by 45 percent from 1997 to 2002, more than four times the national rate for all businesses, the report said.



From time to time, everybody can use a helping hand. Whether you're looking for work and need some assistance polishing your resume, or whether you're a business owner trying to get past those critical first few years, a helping hand at the right time can make all the difference.

Fortunately for workers and business owners in certain parts of North and Northeast Portland, just such a helping hand exists.



SEATTLE—Journalists of color represented only 13.87 percent of the staff in America's daily newsrooms in 2005, according to the American Society of Newspaper Editors' 29th annual newsroom census, released recently.

That percentage represented a nearly invisible increase from last year's census, which identified 13.42 percent of daily journalists as belonging to racial and ethnic minority groups.

About one-quarter of U.S. daily newspapers do not employ a single minority journalist. This year, 377 newspapers reported no minority newsroom employees.



INDIANAPOLIS, Ind.—A new Web site is available that connects African American businesses with consumers.
Called the "African American Connection," the Web site includes African American-owned businesses, employees and non-African American-owned businesses that want to serve the African American community.

Charles Bowlds, founder and CEO of Web site, called it a "self-reliant action born of both need and necessity."



Sen. John Kerry

WASHINGTON—U.S. Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., a member of the Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship, has introduced the Minority Entrepreneurship and Innovation Pilot Program to encourage small business growth among minority populations nationwide.

The legislation creates a $24 million grant program to develop entrepreneurial curricula at historically Black colleges and universities, tribal colleges and Hispanic-serving institutions.



Kaiser Permanente is launching an outreach and mentoring program to help minority contractors compete for construction projects the hospital is planning in Portland during the next several years.

More than $1.7 billion in construction projects are planned for Oregon and Washington, with most of that in the Portland area, said Joanna Davison, manager of National Facilities Services Diversity for Kaiser.

But just as construction plans are coming on line for Kaiser, local construction crews are heading out of Portland and down to Louisiana to rebuild New Orleans and other towns. The new program will help "build our pool of contractors" for the future, she said.



The Rev. Jesse Jackson

LOS ANGELES, Calif.—The ninth annual African American Business Summit 2006, themed "P³ — Power Passion Profit" will have a lineup of dynamic speakers, presenters, keynotes and workshops June 21 to June 26.

The conference will be at Hotel Zoso, in Palm Springs, Calif. The Rev. Jesse Jackson, founder and president of RainbowPUSH Coalition, will deliver the keynote speech.

"P³ — Power Passion Profit" provides small-business professionals serious how-tobusiness-building instruction.


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