12-02-2022  8:58 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Tough Oregon Gun Law Faces Legal Challenge, Could Be Delayed

Midterm voters narrowly passed one of the toughest gun control laws in the nation, but the new permit-to-purchase mandate and ban on high-capacity magazines faces a lawsuit that could put it on ice just days before it's set to take effect.

Portland Approves $27M for New Homeless Camps

Public opposition to the measure and the money that will fund it has been heated, with critics saying it will criminalize homelessness and fail to address its root causes.

Portland Settles Lawsuit Over Police Use of Tear Gas

The lawsuit was originally filed by Don't Shoot Portland in June 2020. “Our freedom of expression is the foundation of how we make social change possible,” Teressa Raiford said in a news release. “Black Lives Still Matter.”

Oregon Lawmakers Lift Security Measure Imposed on Senator

Since July 2019, Sen. Brian Boquist had been required to give 12 hours notice before coming to the Oregon State Capitol, to give the state police time to bolster their security and to ensure the safety of people in the Capitol.

NEWS BRIEFS

PBS Genealogy Show Seeks Viewers’ Brick Walls

The popular PBS show “Finding Your Roots” is putting out a nationwide casting call for a non-celebrity to be featured on season...

The James Museum Opens Black Pioneers: Legacy In The American West

This first-of-its-kind-exhibition explores Black history in the West with a timeline of pictorial quilts. ...

Use of Deadly Force Investigation Involving Clackamas County Sheriff and Oregon State Police Concludes

The grand jury’s role was solely to determine whether the involved officers’ conduct warranted criminal charges; questions...

GOP's Joe Kent contests results of Washington state race

VANCOUVER, Wash. (AP) — Republican Joe Kent’s campaign said Friday it intends to request a machine ballot recount of the counties within southwest Washington state's 3rd Congressional District. “We believe the election workers did their best to ensure a fair election and count...

Case against man arrested in 1994 death of woman dismissed

VANCOUVER, Wash. (AP) — Criminal charges against a man suspected in the 1994 murder of a Vancouver, Washington, woman have been dismissed. Richard Knapp, 60, was released from the Clark County Jail this week after several years in custody. Detectives had used a genealogy database...

Missouri holds off Arkansas 29-27 to reach bowl eligibility

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Missouri and Arkansas will be headed to similar bowl games after the Tigers held off the Razorbacks 29-27 on Saturday night, leaving each of the bitter border rivals 6-6 on the season. Only one walked out of Faurot Field with victory cigars. Brady...

Rivalry week should bring SEC bowl forecast into clear focus

GAINESVILLE, Fla. (AP) — It’s rivalry week for most of the Southeastern Conference. The Egg Bowl. The Iron Bowl. The Palmetto Bowl. The Sunshine Showdown. Clean, Old-Fashioned Hate. The Battle Line Rivalry. It’s a chance for everyone to either avoid or add to the powerhouse...

OPINION

‘I Unreservedly Apologize’

The Oregonian commissioned a study of its history of racism, and published the report on Oct. 24, 2022. The Skanner is pleased to republish the apology written by the editor, Therese Bottomly. We hope other institutions will follow this example of looking...

City Officials Should Take Listening Lessons

Sisters of the Road share personal reflections of their staff after a town hall meeting at which people with lived experience of homelessness spoke ...

When Student Loan Repayments Resume, Will Problems Return Too?

HBCU borrowers question little loan forgiveness, delays to financial security ...

Tell the Supreme Court: We Still Need Affirmative Action

Opponents of affirmative action have been trying to destroy it for years. And now it looks like they just might get their chance. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

GOP's Duarte takes California Central Valley US House seat

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Republican John Duarte defeated Democrat Adam Gray on Friday in a new California U.S. House district in the Central Valley farm belt that produced the closest congressional contest in the state this year. With virtually all of the ballots counted, Duarte has just...

Column: College coaching color barrier firmly entrenched

Hugh Freeze returns to the Southeastern Conference with enough baggage to fill a jumbo jet. He turned his last SEC job into “Freeze Gone Wild," using a university-issued cell phone to call an escort service while presiding over enough scandalous behavior to land Ole Miss on NCAA...

Mamie King-Chalmers, woman in civil rights photo, dies at 81

DETROIT (AP) — Mamie King-Chalmers, who as a young Black woman appeared in an iconic photo about civil rights struggles in Alabama, has died at the age of 81. She died Tuesday in Detroit, her home since the 1970s, daughter Lasuria Allman said. A cause wasn't disclosed. ...

ENTERTAINMENT

Prince William, like his father, prioritizes the environment

BOSTON (AP) — Prince William capped a three-day visit to Boston by meeting with President Joe Biden to share his vision for safeguarding the environment before attending a gala event Friday evening where he sounded an optimistic tone about solving the world’s environmental problems through...

LGBTQ chorus in Colorado Springs unifies community with song

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) — Below the vaulted dome and dark wood beams of a church in Colorado Springs, a gay men's choir rehearsed for a concert that's taken on new meaning after an LGBTQ night club became the site of a shooting that killed five and wounded 17. “There is no...

Britney Spears' massive pop songs to land on Broadway, again

NEW YORK (AP) — A stage musical about woke princesses that uses hit songs by Britney Spears will land on Broadway this summer. "Once Upon a One More Time," featuring Spears' tunes, including “Oops!… I Did It Again,” “Lucky,” “Stronger” and “Toxic,” will start...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

To boost Georgia's Warnock, Biden goes to ... Massachusetts

BOSTON (AP) — President Joe Biden hit the phones with fellow Democrats Friday for Georgia Sen. Raphael Warnock's...

Rail strike averted: Biden signs bill enforcing agreement

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden signed a bill Friday to avert a freight rail strike that he said could...

Distaste for Walker provides tailwind for Warnock in Georgia

MORROW, Ga. (AP) — It might go without saying that Democrats generally vote against Republicans. But in...

US names 4 militants in Afghanistan, Pakistan 'terrorists'

ISLAMABAD (AP) — The United States has added four top Islamic militants operating in Afghanistan and Pakistan to...

US forces monitor Mideast skies at Qatar base amid World Cup

AL-UDEID AIR BASE, Qatar (AP) — As World Cup fans throng stadiums across Qatar, about 8,000 American troops...

Camel pageant is among World Cup's sidelines attractions

ASH-SHHANIYA, Qatar (AP) — Like all good pageant contestants, Nazaa'a displayed not only dazzling beauty but...

Connie Cass and Stacy A. Anderson the Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The nation's economic upheaval has been especially hard on young people trying to start their working lives with a high school education or less. Only about a third are working full-time, compared with two-thirds of recent college grads, according to an Associated Press-Viacom poll.

Most say money was a major reason they bypassed college, and the vast majority aspire to more education someday.

Christopher Cadaret's been fixing TVs and stereos for fun since he was 10 years old and thinks he'd like to work in electronics or auto repair. But four months after he dropped out of high school, he hasn't found any kind of job.

He's tried a local electronics company, the hardware store, the dollar store, the minimart. Nothing.

"I'm seeking work, anything that is put in front of me," said Cadaret, 18, who lives with his father in Burkesville, Ky., a small town amid the hills and farmland along the Tennessee border. Without that first toehold on work, his dream of earning enough to save up for technical training seems far away.

Four in 10 of those surveyed whose education stopped at high school are unemployed. Less than a quarter have part-time jobs, the poll of 18- to 24-year-olds found.

The Labor Department's figures document how much harder it's become for these young adults to find a job since the recession that began late in 2007. The unemployment rate has been over 20 percent each March for the past three years for high school graduates ages 16-24 who have no college education. That's up from 10 percent in March 2007 and 14.5 percent a year later.

For college grads that age, March unemployment peaked at 8.5 percent this year. The government's figures count only those considered actively looking for jobs.

Young adults who skipped higher education are willing to work and have some experience; the vast majority in the AP-Viacom survey have held paying jobs at some point. About two-thirds hold high school diplomas. But a majority - almost six in 10 - say the high school they attended did only a fair to poor job in helping them prepare for work.

About three-fourths worry at least a little about having enough money to get by from week to week.

Almost four in 10 still lean on their parents or relatives for financial support. Still, most feel that their families' financial situations have held them back, especially those whose families earn less than $50,000 per year, according to the survey conducted in partnership with Stanford University.

Three-fourths of those who bypassed college cite cost as a reason. More than half - 56 percent - say money was "very" or "extremely" important to their decision.

They still believe in the power of higher education. Nearly three-fourths say they hope to return to the classroom someday, either for trade school or college.

"I just feel like I've got enough drive and I'm not going to quit," said high school senior Jonathan McDaniel, who's made plans to join the Navy when he graduates from high school in Pittsburg, Okla., this spring. "If you work hard enough, you will get where you want to be."

McDaniel, 18, is interested in pursuing a college degree and maybe a career as a police officer or airplane mechanic. He figures starting out serving on an aircraft carrier "will give me a solid foundation to build my life on."

Cost isn't the only reason many stopped school rather than starting college. Almost half say getting real-world experience before going through more school was a key factor in their decision. And almost as many said they were influenced by their ability to find a job right after high school.

"I kind of always knew college wasn't for me," said Ayla Godfrey, 19, of Charlotte, N.C. "I was ready to get out and work, and I really didn't want to go back to school anymore."

Godfrey said it took her months and more than 100 applications to find work in a clothing store after she graduated from high school in 2009. She later worked as a hostess at an assisted living facility but quit that job after becoming pregnant. Godfrey, who lives with her boyfriend's family and relies on his paycheck, says she feels confident she'll find job happiness after her baby is born.

"I have to make a life for my little baby girl, and I'm willing to do whatever I have to do," she said.

Young people whose education stopped at high school don't report as much certainty about the future as those in college, but they're still strikingly optimistic - eight in 10 are at least somewhat confident they'll find a career that will make them happy.

Most of those with jobs don't feel they've found their calling, however. Six in 10 say their job is just something to get them by, not a career or a stepping stone to one.

And the dismal job market leaves many feeling shut out.

"It's going to take time for the economy to work itself back up for people to find jobs," said Cadaret, who keeps looking. Meanwhile, he said, "I'm worried about money all the time."

The AP-Viacom telephone survey of 1,104 adults ages 18-24 was conducted Feb. 18-March 6 by GfK Roper Public Affairs & Corporate Communications. The margin of sampling error is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points.

Stanford University's participation in this project was made possible by a grant from The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

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AP Polling Director Trevor Tompson, Deputy Director of Polling Jennifer Agiesta and AP News Survey Specialist Dennis Junius contributed to this report.

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