12-18-2017  6:41 am      •     
MLK Breakfast
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NEWS BRIEFS

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Special Call for Stories about the Spanish Flu

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Q&A with Facebook's Global Director of Diversity Maxine Williams

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City Announces Laura John as Tribal Liason

Laura John brings an extensive background in tribal advocacy and community engagement to the city of Portland ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Don’t Delay, Sign-up for Affordable Healthcare Today

The deadline to enroll or modify healthcare coverage under the Affordable Care Act is December 15. ...

The Skanner Editorial: Alabama Voters Must Reject Moore

Allegations of predatory behavior are troubling – and so is his resume ...

Payday Lenders Continue Attack on Consumer Protections

Charlene Crowell of the Center for Responsible Lending writes that two bills that favor predatory lenders has received bipartisan...

Hundreds Rallied for Meek Mill, but What About the Rest?

Lynette Monroe, a guest columnist for the NNPA Newswire, talks about Meek Mill, the shady judge that locked him up and mass...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

In this Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2015 photo, from left, Jo Armstrong, Julie Armstrong, Skylar Armstrong, Amelia Anderson, Nathan Anderson, Westley Armstrong and Dean Anderson sit together for a game at their home in Tucson, Ariz. At 42 with a blended family of five, Nathan Anderson runs an acupuncture clinic with his wife, Julie, also an acupuncturist. Combined, their monthly student loans bills approach $1,700. "More than we spend on groceries and kind of like having a second mortgage," Nathan said. (AP Photo/Rick Scuteri)
JOSH BOAK, AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's $1.2 trillion in student debt is having consequences in far-reaching ways.

College dropouts and students who borrowed to attend for-profit colleges are at risk of default. Many Generation X parents — ages 35 to 50 — are still repaying debt even as their children prepare to enter college and begin a second generation of family debt. Some millennials are delaying marriage and home ownership until their loans become less burdensome.

Three trends show how the pressures from student debt are compounding:

FALLING INCOMES

For people with college degrees but no graduate school education, incomes, after accounting for inflation, have declined, reducing their ability to repay their loans. For a 23-to-29-year-old with a college degree, median income in 2013 was $41,000. That figure has plunged $5,000 in current dollars since 2000, according to Georgetown University's Center on Education and the Workforce.

The drop reflects a trend dating to 1970 of stagnant income for the college educated with no graduate degree — evidence that the supply of these workers has roughly matched employer demand.

Median incomes have risen consistently for one group since 1970: Workers older than 30 with graduate degrees. But even those gains began stalling before the Great Recession began in late 2007.

 

MORE BORROWING

A typical member of the class of 2013 graduated owing $27,300, according to the College Board. This figure has risen $5,000 in current dollars since 2000, a 22 percent jump. College grads who go straight into master's programs often owe a combined $70,000 by the time they leave. Debt averaged $41,400 for a master's degree, $71,600 for a research doctorate and $128,600 for a professional doctorate in medicine or law, according to exclusive Education Department data analyzed for The Associated Press.

 

LESS SPENDING ELSEWHERE

When incomes fail to rise, every additional dollar in debt comes at a cost: A delay in major purchases, such as cars or homes. This can slow the economy because consumer spending drives about 70 percent of U.S. economic activity.

In 2013, college-educated heads of households under age 40 owed $4,850 in annual student loan payments, the Federal Reserve Survey of Consumer Finances shows. The figure has shot up by $1,090 since 2001 after adjusting for inflation.

The surge in student debt has coincided with reduced spending in other categories. Auto loan payments fell by nearly half from 2001 to 2013. Mortgage payments have also dipped, in part because of a lack of affordability in cities with many recent college graduates.

Surveys show that student debt increasingly monopolizes family budgets. The average yearly grocery budget was $4,719 in 2013 — $130 less than what the Fed said college-educated households owed in loans.

 

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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