04 20 2015
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  • When should we use military to enforce US goals? NASHUA, N.H. (AP) — Rand Paul lashed out Saturday at military hawks in the Republican Party in a clash over foreign policy dividing the packed GOP presidential field. Paul, a first-term senator from Kentucky who favors a smaller U.S. footprint in the world, said that some of his Republican colleagues would do more harm in international affairs than would leading Democrat Hillary Rodham Clinton. "The other Republicans will criticize the president and Hillary Clinton for their foreign policy, but they would just have done the same thing — just 10 times over," Paul said on the closing day of a New Hampshire GOP conference that brought about 20 presidential prospects to the first-in-the-nation primary state. "There's a group of folks in our party who would have troops in six countries right now, maybe more," Paul said. Foreign policy looms large in the presidential race as the U.S. struggles to resolve diplomatic and military conflicts across the globe. The GOP presidential class regularly rails against President Barack Obama's leadership on the world stage, yet some would-be contenders have yet to articulate their own positions, while others offered sharply different visions. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, whose brother, President George W. Bush, authorized the 2003 invasion of Iraq, declined to say whether he would have done anything different then. Yet Jeb Bush acknowledged a shift in his party against new military action abroad. "Our enemies need to fear us, a little bit, just enough for them to deter the actions that create insecurity," Bush said earlier in the conference. He said restoring alliances "that will create less likelihood of America's boots on the ground has to be the priority, the first priority of the next president." The GOP's hawks were well represented at the event, led by Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, who has limited foreign policy experience but articulated a muscular vision during his Saturday keynote address. Walker said the threats posed by radical Islamic terrorism won't be handled simply with "a couple bombings." "We're not going to wait till they bring the fight to us," Walker said. "We're going to bring the fight to them and fight on their soil." South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham addressed the question of putting U.S. troops directly in the battle against the Islamic State group militants by saying there is only one way to defeat the militants: "You go over there and you fight them so they don't come here." Texas Sen. Ted Cruz suggested an aggressive approach as well. "The way to defeat ISIS is a simple and clear military objective," he said. "We will destroy them." Businesswoman Carly Fiorina offered a similar outlook. "The world is a more dangerous and more tragic place when America is not leading. And America has not led for quite some time," she said. Under Obama, a U.S.-led coalition of Western and Arab countries is conducting regular airstrikes against Islamic State targets in Iraq and Syria. The U.S. also has hundreds of military advisers in Iraq helping Iraqi security forces plan operations against the Islamic State, which occupies large chunks of northern and western Iraq. Paul didn't totally reject the use of military force, noting that he recently introduced a declaration of war against the Islamic State group. But in an interview with The Associated Press, he emphasized the importance of diplomacy. He singled out Russia and China, which have complicated relationships with the U.S., as countries that could contribute to U.S. foreign policy interests. "I think the Russians and the Chinese have great potential to help make the world a better place," he said. "I don't say that naively that they're going to, but they have the potential to." Paul suggested the Russians could help by getting Syrian President Bashar Assad to leave power. "Maybe he goes to Russia," Paul said. Despite tensions with the U.S., Russia and China negotiated alongside Washington in nuclear talks with Iran. Paul has said he is keeping an open mind about the nuclear negotiations. "The people who already are very skeptical, very doubtful, may not like the president for partisan reasons," he said, and "just may want war instead of negotiations."
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Jesse Hagopian press conference

Seattle Black Film Festival Launches This Week

The Langston Hughes African American Film Festival continues through April 22 with a powerful lineup that includes Seattle premieres, local directors, a LGBT focus, Weekday Happy Hour Films, Ladies Night, Teen Fest, talkbacks and panel discussions.

The event is at the Langston Hughes Performing Arts Center, 104 17th Ave. S. at Yesler Way.

There will be new and seasoned filmmakers in attendance, some with recent awards and accolades in tow. LHAAFF always offers a unique blend of returning filmmakers and each year the festival sparks memorable and provocative discussions from across the aisle and across neighborhoods.

The festival spotlights dozens of feature-length and short films by independent filmmakers, and the rare opportunity to chat face-to-face with filmmakers, industry professionals and Seattle leadership. Tickets to just the opening or closing night film events are $20.

All other LHAAFF screenings are $8 for adults and $5 for youth younger than 16 and seniors. The All-Access Langston Pass, which includes access to both the opening and closing night films, is $50. All film details, including show times, locations and ticketing information are available at www.langstonblackfilmfest.org or by calling 206-326-1088.

#MYHIVMOMENT: Youth Creating an Aids-Free Generation

In recognition of National Youth HIV & AIDS Awareness Day (NYHAAD), The Seattle Public Library and Seattle-area youth HIV activists will host a free educational community forum from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, April 18 at the Central Library, 1000 Fourth Ave., Level 1, Microsoft Auditorium.

The community forum will feature a panel discussion on "A Future United: Youth Creating an AIDS-free Generation," with an open dialogue about HIV/AIDS stigma and its effect on youth, as well as prevention efforts. The discussion will be hosted by local drag personality, Aleksa Manila, and will include guest speakers working in the field of HIV education.

The panel will include:

Tranisha Arzah, BABES Network-YWCA; Manuel Venegas, NYHAAD Ambassador, Advocates for Youth; Bas Frost, Lifelong’s Health Education Youth Outreach (HEYO), Peace for the Streets by Kids for the Streets; Brandyn Gallagher, PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis) Facts: Rethinking Prevention and Sex.

This program is funded by the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence and presented in partnership with the #MyHIVMoment campaign, a collaborative effort of Lifelong, the Center for Multicultural Health, Entre Hermanos, Gay City Men’s Health, Seattle Counseling Services, and We Are 1.

For more information, call the Library at 206-386-4636 or www.spl.org..

MOHAI: Maker Day on Coding

On the last Saturday of the month, come to Maker Day at MOHAI to tinker, experiment and create alongside some of Seattle's most innovative makers. Drop in any time between 11 am-2 pm; activities are designed for all ages and skill levels and no reservation is necessary!

On April 25: Create computer games and animation with Code Fellows.

Learn basic software programming concepts from Code Fellows instructors and alumni. We'll use Scratch to create our own interactive games, stories, and animation! Perfect for all ages and experience.

Cost is included with museum admission

Location Museum of History & Industry, 860 Terry Ave N. Contact  MOHAI Programs, 206-324-1126 ex. 165

Repair Café At The Seattle Public Library

Don't throw away broken electronics - fix them! Instructors from the Phinney Neighborhood Association (PNA) Fixers Collective will teach people of all ages how to fix appliances, computers and other electrical devices from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, April 25 at the Greenwood Branch, 8016 Greenwood Ave. N., 206-684-4086.

Library events and programs are free and everyone is welcome. Registration is not required. Free parking is available in the underground garage. Enter and exit the garage on 81st Street.

Children, teens and adults are invited to learn how common electronic items work and save money while exploring the lost art of DIY fixing. Attendees should bring their broken appliances, computers, tools, gadgets and other electrical devices to Repair Café and learn how to fix them.

For more information, call Library at 206-684-4086 or www.spk.org.

Library Accepting Applications for Student Assistant Program

Teens ages 16 and older are invited to learn about and apply to the Student Assistant Program at The Seattle Public Library. Eligible students have until 5 p.m., Thursday, April 30, 2015 to apply. For more details on how to apply, visit Library Job Listings.

The Student Assistant program gives young people valuable work experience at the Library. Applicants must be enrolled in school programs, but may not yet have completed bachelor's degrees. Students accepted into the program may participate for up to three years, or until they no longer qualify as students.

To apply, a student must complete an Employment Application, a cover letter, proof of school enrollment and a reference from an educator/employer (form included in the application).

The Library will offer a workshop and computer lab time for students to learn more about how to apply to be a Student Assistant. Dates and times are as follows:

Student Assistant Open Lab - Students will have the opportunity to work on their online applications. Library staff will be available to answer questions about the application process as well as provide interviewing tips, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, April 22 , Thursday, April 23, Wednesday, April 29 and Thursday, April 30 at the South Park Branch, 8604 Eighth Ave. S. at S. Cloverdale St., 206-615-1688.

For more information, call the Library at 206-386-4636 or  www.spl.org.

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