05 24 2016
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  • The judge concluded Officer Edward Nero played little role in the arrest and wasn't responsible for the failure by police to buckle Gray in  
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  • Bill Cosby faces a preliminary hearing Tuesday to determine if his criminal sex-assault case in suburban Philadelphia goes to trial.Prosecutors had declined to charge the comedian-actor over the 2005 complaint, but arrested him in December after his explosive deposition in the woman's lawsuit became public. In the testimony given in that deposition, Cosby is grilled about giving drugs and alcohol to women before sex; making secret payments to ex-lovers; and hosting Andrea Constand at his home. They knew each other through Temple University, where he was a trustee and she managed the women's basketball team. Bill Cosby's wife refused to answer dozens of questions during a combative deposition in a defamation lawsuit filed by seven women who say the comedian branded them liars after they accused him of sexually assaulting them, according to a transcript released Friday. Camille Cosby was subjected to intense questioning by the women's lawyer, who repeatedly pressed her to say whether she believes her husband "acted with a lack of integrity" during their 52-year marriage. The lawyer also asked if her husband used his position and power "to manipulate young women." Camille Cosby didn't answer those questions and many others after her lawyer cited marital privilege, the legal protection given to communications between spouses. She repeatedly said she had "no opinion" when pressed on whether she viewed her husband's behavior as dishonest and a violation of their marriage vows. About 50 women have publicly accused Bill Cosby of forcing unwanted sexual contact on them decades ago. Cosby has denied the allegations. He faces a criminal case in Pennsylvania, where prosecutors have charged him with sexually violating a former Temple University employee, Andrea Constand. He has pleaded not guilty. Camille Cosby answered questions in the deposition Feb. 22 and again April 19 after her lawyers argued unsuccessfully to stop it. A judge ruled she would have to give a deposition but said she could refuse to answer questions about private communications between her and her husband. Camille Cosby's lawyer, Monique Pressley, repeatedly cited that privilege and advised her not to answer many questions asked by the women's lawyer, Joseph Cammarata. The exchanges between Cammarata and Cosby became testy at times, and she admonished him: "Don't lecture me. Just keep going with the questions." Using a transcript of a deposition Bill Cosby gave in a civil lawsuit filed by Constand in 2005 and a transcript of an interview she gave to Oprah Winfrey in 2000, Cammarata asked Camille Cosby about extramarital affairs her husband had. "Were you aware of your husband setting up trusts for the benefit of women that he had a sexual relationship with?" Cammarata asked. She didn't answer after her lawyer cited marital privilege. Cammarata asked her about Shawn Thompson, a woman who said Bill Cosby fathered her daughter, Autumn Jackson, in the 1970s. Jackson was convicted in 1997 of attempting to extort money from Bill Cosby to prevent her from telling a tabloid she's his daughter. He acknowledged he had an affair with her mother and had given her money. "Was it a big deal when this came up in the 1970s that your husband had — big deal to you that your husband had an extramarital affair and potentially had a daughter from that extramarital affair?" Cammarata asked. "It was a big deal then, yes," Camille Cosby replied. She said she had "no opinion" on whether her husband's admission he obtained quaaludes to give to women with whom he wanted to have sex violated their marriage vows. Her lawyer objected and instructed her not to answer when Cammarata asked her if she ever suspected she had been given any type of drug to alter her state of consciousness when she had sex with her husband. A spokesman for the Cosbys declined to comment on her deposition. The Cosbys have a home in Shelburne Falls, an hour's drive from Springfield, where the lawsuit, seeking unspecified damages, was filed. An attorney handling a separate lawsuit against Bill Cosby revealed Friday that Playboy magazine founder Hugh Hefner provided sworn testimony Wednesday. In the sexual battery lawsuit filed in Los Angeles, Judy Huth says Cosby forced her to perform a sex act on him at the Playboy Mansion around 1974, when she was 15. Bill Cosby's former lawyers have accused Huth of attempting to extort him before filing the case and have tried unsuccessfully to have it dismissed. Huth's attorney, Gloria Allred, said Hefner's testimony will remain under seal for now. Hefner also was named as a defendant in a case filed Monday by former model Chloe Goins, who accuses Bill Cosby of drugging and sexually abusing her at the Playboy Mansion in 2008.   The Associated Press generally doesn't identify people who say they're victims of sexual abuse, but the women accusing Cosby have come forward to tell their stories.___AP Entertainment Writer Anthony McCartney contributed to this report from Los Angeles.
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NCCAA video reviews

PHOTO: In this March 12, 2015, photo, a member of the scorer's crew sets up the DVSport replay system before an NCAA college basketball game in the quarterfinals of the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament in Greensboro, N.C. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

 

The NCAA is going all in on high-def video reviews during March Madness.

For the men's and women's basketball tournaments that begin this week, the NCAA for the first time will use a replay system that captures live high-definition video from multiple angles for immediate review. That means officials will be able to see much more quickly some of the same replays everyone is seeing on TV — and just maybe some of those delays to get a call right won't be so excruciatingly long.

"The last thing you want at the end of the game is a four-minute delay that takes the energy out of the building and cools the players down and all that," said Kim Jackson, director of basketball operations for DVSport, the system's developer. "No. 1, you've got to get the call right, but No. 2, we need to be hopefully as efficient as possible. ... Delaying a game can change momentum and impact the game."

No longer will there be extended delays in the tournament because an official has to go to a monitor with only a network feed, put on a headset and try to explain to a producer in the TV truck outside exactly what he or she wants to see — a familiar scene in many smaller conferences lucky enough to have a TV feed to rely on.

bracket ncaaClick image to view full size NCAA Championship Bracket

That process usually led to the officials seeing the back of their heads on the monitor while the video was being cued, and cameras showed them waiting to see the replay the TV audience had already seen multiple times and was already tweeting or posting Vines about.

With the DVSport system already used by several leagues during the season, game officials generally have instant access to the main TV feed and three other angles.

They have a pad with a shuttle control that allows them to watch from different angles at different speeds. They can zoom in on individual frames and, if necessary, can then request views additional cameras might have captured.

"The most important thing is that we can get all the angles and make sure we see what people see at home on TV. ... We utilize replay to make sure we got it right," veteran official Joe DeRosa said. "It's really a valuable tool."

DeRosa, one of only two officials who has worked both the NCAA Final Four and the NBA Finals, did Big 12 Tournament games last week. His regular-season schedule included games in the Big 12, SEC, American and Conference USA, which also use DVSport. The ACC also uses the system, and the Big East men had it available during their tournament last week.

"Our officials have the same passion as our coaches — they want to make their team play better and make minimum mistakes and continue to improve," said John Underwood, the Big 12 associate commissioner for men's basketball and game management. "They want to get the plays right."

DVSport is already well-known to many pro and college sports teams for its custom software packages that allow coaches and players to use iPads or laptops to break down film of themselves or opposing teams. The Pittsburgh-based company got into football replay after the Big Ten had a pilot program, and then got NCAA approval on a proposal to allow conferences and independent institutions to experiment with the use of video replay during the 2005 season.

Now common in football, a replay system specific to basketball was introduced five years later and is now going to be used in the Big Dance for the first time.

Jackson said basketball officials they consulted during development asked for control of the video and standard-sized monitors showing HD video.

"Sometimes they would go to one school and they would have a 7-inch monitor that's black and white," he said. "And they're expected to make a decision that affects the outcome of the game, and then you have got everybody at home watching it on 50-inch HD TVs."

The NCAA will also use DVSport for replays in all Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) playoff games, and the semifinal and championship games in Division II and Division III football.

Division I basketball tournaments will also debut Precision Timing Systems technology already used by most Division I conferences in which officials stop the clock simply by blowing the whistle. The clock restarts when a switch is flipped on the ref's belt pack.

Dan Gavitt, the NCAA's vice president of men's basketball, said the new replay and timing systems "will allow us to use the best available technology to be as accurate as possible with regards to timing and reviewable plays."

 

 Click here to read Kentucky Basketball Legacy: The Black Athlete

 

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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