04 21 2015
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40 Years of Service
McMenamins

BIG BUDGET FILMS

Get Him to the Greek (R for graphic sexuality, and pervasive sexuality and drug use) Intercontinental road comedy about the hijinks which ensue when an ambitious intern (Jonah Hill) is assigned to escort an over-imbibing, womanizing rock star (Russell Brand) from London to L.A. for a comeback concert. Spinoff of "Forgetting Sarah Marshall" features Rose Byrne and Sean Diddy Combs, with cameos by Christina Aguilera, Pink, Pharrell, Meredith Viera and Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman.

Killers (PG-13 for sexuality, profanity and violence) Ashton Kutcher and Katherine Heigl co-star in this action comedy about an international spy who retires from the CIA to settle down in suburbia with the girl of his dreams only to discover they're being trailed by vicious assassins intent on killing them. With Tom Selleck, Martin Mull, Catherine O'Hara and SNL's Casey Wilson.

Marmaduke (PG for crude humor and mild epithets) Live action adaptation of the popular comic strip features Owen Wilson as the voice of the clumsy, if lovable, Great Dane. Road comedy revolves around the pet and his owners' misadventures as the family relocates from Kansas to California. Cast includes William H. Macy, Judy Greer and Anjelah Johnson, with voiceover work by George Lopez, Marlon Wayans, Sam Elliot and Christopher Mintz-Plasse.

 

Splice (R for nudity, profanity, violence, disturbing images and graphic sexuality) Sci-fi horror flick about a couple of renegade scientists (Adrien Brody and Sarah Polley) whose ethically-questionable experimentation splicing together human and animal DNA results in the creation of a beautiful but dangerous mutant (Delphine Chaneac).


INDEPENDENT & FOREIGN FILMS

Burzynski (Unrated) Medical documentary chronicling the 14-year court battle waged by controversial biochemist Dr. Stanislaw Burzynski in a lawsuit against the FDA on behalf of cancer patients eager to try Antineoplastons, his life-saving, alternative gene therapy, in lieu of chemotherapy, surgery and/or radiation.

Cropsey (Unrated) Urban legend documentary shot by a couple of first-time filmmakers from Staten Island determined to find out whether there's any truth to the haunting rumor circulated during their childhood that an escapee from a nearby insane asylum had been responsible for the mysterious disappearance of five kids from their neighborhood.

Double Take (Unrated) Hitchcock mockumentary mixing found footage featuring musings by the master of suspense with archival Cold War news footage to paint a chilling picture of sheer paranoia.

Finding Bliss (R for nudity, profanity, sexuality and explicit dialogue) Romantic comedy about an aspiring, young filmmaker (Leelee Sobieski) who settles for a job as an editor for a porn director (Matthew Davis) only to have her morals compromised when she surprisingly falls in love with her sleazy boss. With Denise Richards, Kristen Johnston and Jamie Kennedy.

Ondine (PG-13 for violence, sensuality and brief profanity) Oscar-winner Neil Jordan (for The Crying Game) directs this modern fairy tale, set in County Cork, about an Irish fisherman (Colin Farrell) who becomes convinced that the woman (Alicja Bachleda) caught in his net is a mermaid. With Stephen Rea, Tony Curran and Alison Barry.

Raajneeti (Unrated) Political potboiler, set in Bhopal, India, about a fiercely fought election campaign where influence-peddling and corruption are the norms, and where treachery and manipulation are routinely used as weapons. Ensemble cast includes Naseeruddin Shah, Ajay Devgan, Nana Patekar, Arjun Rampal, Manoj Bajpai, Ranbir Kapoor and Katrina Kaif. (In Hindi with subtitles)

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Undead (Unrated) Horror comedy about a stage director (Jake Hoffman) who hires his ex (Devon Aoki) and best friend (Kris Lemche) to co-star in an offbeat adaptation of Hamlet only to find the production plagued by the arrival of some sexy, 2,000 year-old vampires.

Valhalla Rising (Unrated) Historical saga, set in 1000 AD, revolving around a mysterious mute warrior (Mads Mikkelsen) with superhuman strength who discovers his true self aboard a Viking ship headed for Jerusalem which ends up diverted to the gates of Hell instead. With Gary Lewis, Jamie Sives and Callum Mitchell.

Whiz Kids (Unrated) Brainiac documentary about a trio of 17 year-old eggheads competing to win the nation's most prestigious science competition.

Pacific NW Carpenters Union

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  • When should we use military to enforce US goals? NASHUA, N.H. (AP) — Rand Paul lashed out Saturday at military hawks in the Republican Party in a clash over foreign policy dividing the packed GOP presidential field. Paul, a first-term senator from Kentucky who favors a smaller U.S. footprint in the world, said that some of his Republican colleagues would do more harm in international affairs than would leading Democrat Hillary Rodham Clinton. "The other Republicans will criticize the president and Hillary Clinton for their foreign policy, but they would just have done the same thing — just 10 times over," Paul said on the closing day of a New Hampshire GOP conference that brought about 20 presidential prospects to the first-in-the-nation primary state. "There's a group of folks in our party who would have troops in six countries right now, maybe more," Paul said. Foreign policy looms large in the presidential race as the U.S. struggles to resolve diplomatic and military conflicts across the globe. The GOP presidential class regularly rails against President Barack Obama's leadership on the world stage, yet some would-be contenders have yet to articulate their own positions, while others offered sharply different visions. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, whose brother, President George W. Bush, authorized the 2003 invasion of Iraq, declined to say whether he would have done anything different then. Yet Jeb Bush acknowledged a shift in his party against new military action abroad. "Our enemies need to fear us, a little bit, just enough for them to deter the actions that create insecurity," Bush said earlier in the conference. He said restoring alliances "that will create less likelihood of America's boots on the ground has to be the priority, the first priority of the next president." The GOP's hawks were well represented at the event, led by Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, who has limited foreign policy experience but articulated a muscular vision during his Saturday keynote address. Walker said the threats posed by radical Islamic terrorism won't be handled simply with "a couple bombings." "We're not going to wait till they bring the fight to us," Walker said. "We're going to bring the fight to them and fight on their soil." South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham addressed the question of putting U.S. troops directly in the battle against the Islamic State group militants by saying there is only one way to defeat the militants: "You go over there and you fight them so they don't come here." Texas Sen. Ted Cruz suggested an aggressive approach as well. "The way to defeat ISIS is a simple and clear military objective," he said. "We will destroy them." Businesswoman Carly Fiorina offered a similar outlook. "The world is a more dangerous and more tragic place when America is not leading. And America has not led for quite some time," she said. Under Obama, a U.S.-led coalition of Western and Arab countries is conducting regular airstrikes against Islamic State targets in Iraq and Syria. The U.S. also has hundreds of military advisers in Iraq helping Iraqi security forces plan operations against the Islamic State, which occupies large chunks of northern and western Iraq. Paul didn't totally reject the use of military force, noting that he recently introduced a declaration of war against the Islamic State group. But in an interview with The Associated Press, he emphasized the importance of diplomacy. He singled out Russia and China, which have complicated relationships with the U.S., as countries that could contribute to U.S. foreign policy interests. "I think the Russians and the Chinese have great potential to help make the world a better place," he said. "I don't say that naively that they're going to, but they have the potential to." Paul suggested the Russians could help by getting Syrian President Bashar Assad to leave power. "Maybe he goes to Russia," Paul said. Despite tensions with the U.S., Russia and China negotiated alongside Washington in nuclear talks with Iran. Paul has said he is keeping an open mind about the nuclear negotiations. "The people who already are very skeptical, very doubtful, may not like the president for partisan reasons," he said, and "just may want war instead of negotiations."
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