04 21 2015
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Maleficent

BIG BUDGET FILMS   

Maleficent (PG for action, violence and frightening images) Angelina Jolie plays the title character in this reimagining of Sleepy Beauty from the perspective of the classic fairy tale’s infamous villain, an embittered shrew driven by revenge to put a curse on the king’s (Sharlto Copley) young daughter (Elle Fanning). Cast includes Sam Riley, Imelda Staunton and Juno Temple. 

A Million Ways to Die in the West (R for violence, drug use, crude humor, graphic sexuality and pervasive profanity) Seth MacFarlane wrote, directed and stars in this irreverent Western, set in Arizona in 1882, as a cowardly shepherd who finally summons up some courage when his girlfriend’s (Charlize Theron) gun-slinging husband (Liam Neeson) suddenly shows up in town bent on vengeance. With Amanda Seyfried, Neil Patrick Harris, Sarah Silverman and Giovanni Ribisi.

INDEPENDENT & FOREIGN FILMS 

Delivery (Unrated) Demon seed horror flick about a couple (Laurel Vail and Danny Barclay) expecting their first child who decide to document the pregnancy for a reality-TV show, only to discover that the newborn’s been possessed by an evil spirit. With Rob Cobuzio, Colter Allison and Rebecca Brooks.    

Emoticon ;) (Unrated) Romance drama about the Digital Age dating frustrations of an Anthropology student (Livia De Paolis) who’s writing her thesis on modern methods of communication. Supporting cast includes Michael Cristofer, Carol Kane, Daphne Rubin-Vega and Sonia Braga. 

Filth (R for violence, profanity, drug use, frontal nudity and graphic sexuality) Screen adaptation of the Irvine Welsh novel of the same name about a bigoted, drug-addicted, cross-dressing, bipolar police officer‘s (James McAvoy) efforts to secure a promotion and to reconcile with his estranged wife (Shauna Macdonald) and daughter (Megan Finn). With Jamie Bell, Eddie Marsan, Jim Broadbent and Imogen Poots.

The Grand Seduction (PG-13 for drug references and suggestive material) English-language remake of Seducing Doctor Lewis, the 2003 French farce about a tiny fishing village’s attempt to convince a visiting physician (Taylor Kitsch) to relocate there from the big city. Co-starring Brendan Gleeson, Liana Balaban and Anna Hopkins.  

The Hornet’s Nest (R for pervasive profanity) Afghan War documentary chronicling veteran journalist Mike Boettcher and son Carlos’ nightmare when their covering U.S. troops on the front lines turned into a hair-raising fight for survival. 

Korengal (Unrated) Sequel to the Oscar-nominated documentary Restrepo, directed by Sebastian Junger (A Perfect Storm), serves up another slice of the War in Afghanistan from the point of view of a decimated platoon of American soldiers stationed in a very vulnerable valley surrounded by Taliban fighters on a suicide mission.    

doris-payne-introPHOTO: Doris Payne's mugshot from a movie still

The Life and Crimes of Doris Payne (Unrated) “Diamond in the Rough” biopic chronicling the exploits of an infamous, African-American jewel thief from humble roots who fleeced upscale retailers like Cartier and Tiffany of millions in gems over the course of a checkered career which spanned 60+ years.

Lucky Them (R for profanity, sexuality and drug use) Toni Collette stars in this tale of redemption as a music critic assigned by her magazine to interview her reclusive, retired rock star ex-boyfriend (Johnny Depp) who hasn’t been seen in public for over a decade. With Oliver Platt, Thomas Haden Church and Amy Seimetz.      

Night Moves (R for nudity and profanity) Eco-thriller revolving around a trio of radical environmentalists (Jesse Eisenberg, Dakota Fanning and Peter Sarsgaard) determined to protect the planet by any means necessary who conspire to detonate a hydroelectric dam. With Alia Shawkat, Clara Mamet and Logan Miller.

Venus in Fur (Unrated) Roman Polanski screen adaptation of the David Ives play of the same name about a director (Mathieu Amalric) who finds himself seduced by an aspiring starlet (Emmanuelle Seigner) auditioning for the lead role in his highly-erotic, upcoming production. (In French and German with subtitles)

We Are the Best! (Unrated) Coming-of-age drama, set in Stockholm in 1982, where we find three 13 year-old girls (Mira Barkhammar, Mira Grosin and Liv LeMoyne) without instruments forming a punk rock band even though their friends and family say the genre is dying. With Alvin Strollo, Mattias Wiberg and Jonathan Salomonsson. (In Swedish with subtitles)

Pacific NW Carpenters Union

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