08-19-2022  10:19 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Portland Mayor Bans Homeless Camps on School Walking Routes

The declaration bans camping along “priority routes to and from schools” and within 150 feet of school buildings

GOP Lawmaker Arrested, Accused of Disorderly Conduct at Fair

The incident happened after the rodeo when he had four beers and then lit a cigarette. A woman asked him to put it out.

Prosecutor Asks for Probe Into Seattle Mayor's Deleted Texts

Guidelines for preserving public records require that texts and other communications by local elected officials about public business be kept for at least two years before being transferred to the state’s archives “for appraisal and selective retention.”

Head of Oregon’s Troubled Public Defense System Is Fired

The executive director of the Office of Public Defense Services, Stephen Singer, was fired by an oversight panel. Critics cited an abrasive, combative style Singer brought to his job.

NEWS BRIEFS

Reduced Costs for Parks Programs

Portland Parks & Recreation announces new Parks Levy-funded Access Pass to reduce cost as a barrier for Recreation and...

Measure on Portland Government to Appear as-Is on Ballot

Politicians, business leaders and civic activists have called for reshaping Portland’s form of government, which they say...

The Regional Arts & Culture Council Rolls Out New Grant Program

The Arts3C grant program is designed to be fully responsive to what artists and art makers in the community need funding to support ...

OHA Introduces New Monkeypox (hMPXV) Website

As of Aug. 10, 95 people have tested positive for monkeypox in Oregon ...

Wyden, Colleagues Renew Request for FDA to Address Concerns about Dangerous Pulse Oximeter Inaccuracies Affecting Communities of Color

“There are decades of research showing inaccurate results when pulse oximeters are used to monitor people of color” ...

Public health emergency declared over monkeypox in WA county

SEATTLE (AP) — King County, which includes Seattle, on Friday officially declared the local monkeypox outbreak a public health emergency as infections continue to increase in the city and other parts of the state. “We are fortunate to have one of the best public health...

Hiker dies in fall at Oregon's Multnomah Falls

MULTNOMAH FALLS, Ore. (AP) — A hiker fell and died near Multnomah Falls in Oregon on Friday, officials said. Corbett Fire Chief Rick Wunsch said in a written statement that firefighters were sent to a call of a fallen hiker at about 1:20 p.m. Friday. Four...

Mizzou full of optimism with new QB, defensive coordinator

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Missouri coach Eli Drinkwitz is on his third defensive coordinator in three years at Missouri, and the Tigers are about to start their fifth different quarterback in the season opener in the last five years. Sounds like a program that should be on shaky ground. ...

Hoosiers looking for a turnaround after dismal 2021 season

Indiana linebacker Cam Jones and quarterback Jack Tuttle took matters into their own hands this offseason. They called their teammates together to discuss the goals and aspirations of the program, the need to always play with an edge and to break down precisely why things went wrong...

OPINION

No One Ever Told You About Black August?

Black America lives in a series of deserts. Many of us live in food deserts, financial deserts, employment deserts, and most of us live in information deserts. ...

Betsy Johnson Fails to Condemn Confederate Flags at Her Rally

The majority of Oregonians, including our rural communities, value inclusion and unity, not racism and bigotry. ...

Monkeypox, Covid, and Your Vote

We must start a voter registration drive right here where we live. This effort must become as important to us as putting food on the table and a roof over our heads. ...

Speaking of Reparations

To many Americans, “reparations” is a dirty word when applied to Black folks. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Federal court rejects Mississippi student's racial bias suit

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A lawsuit alleging a school district in a small Mississippi Delta town discriminated against a Black student and stripped her of an academic award has been dismissed by a panel of federal judges. Olecia James filed the federal lawsuit in 2019 against the...

Court opens door to voiding N. Carolina Voter ID amendment

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina’s highest court opened the door Friday to nullifying a voter ID mandate approved by citizens in 2018 because the lawmakers who put it on the ballot were elected from districts tainted by illegal racial bias. However, the North Carolina Supreme...

Georgia PSC elections again delayed after high court ruling

ATLANTA (AP) — Two Georgia Public Service Commission elections will not occur this November, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Friday, reversing an earlier appeals court ruling that allowed them to proceed. Instead, the high court reverted to the original decision by a federal judge in...

ENTERTAINMENT

LL Cool J, Nicki Minaj and Jack Harlow to emcee MTV Awards

NEW YORK (AP) — The MTV Video Music Awards later this month will have not one emcee but three, with rap stars LL Cool J, Nicki Minaj and Jack Harlow all set to anchor the ceremony. They’ll introduce and present the famous Moon Person trophies alongside performers including Lizzo,...

Defective sex toys get a 2nd chance — as fashionable shoes

NEW YORK (AP) — Sex toys and shoes? Try, sex toys IN shoes. A little streetwear label has partnered with a giant in the adult toy industry to create a shoe derived in part from unused, defective amusements that come off the manufacturing line as misfits. Looking a lot...

Wainwright's new music takes inspiration from turning 75

NEW YORK (AP) — Loudon Wainwright III points out that the first line of the first song on his first album, released when he was 23, is about aging: “In Delaware when I was younger.” So it's no stretch that the folk singer's first album of new compositions in eight years,...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Kobe Bryant's widow says crash photos turned grief to horror

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Vanessa Bryant testified Friday that she was only beginning to grieve the loss of her...

Large fire consumes boats, buildings, vehicles at boatyard

MATTAPOISETT, Mass. (AP) — A huge fire at a Massachusetts marina turned several boats, buildings and vehicles...

See it? Squish it! Fighting the invasive spotted lanternfly

When Stephen Nixon recently noticed a “beautiful” spotted lanternfly by his bag as he skateboarded in...

Yangtze shrinks as China's drought disrupts industry

CHONGQING, China (AP) — Ships crept down the middle of the Yangtze on Friday after China's driest summer in six...

Weather warning in Germany after Europe storms kill 12

BERLIN (AP) — Authorities in Germany warned of heavy rainfall in the south Friday and put air rescue services on...

Bomb threats put tiny Moldova, Ukraine's neighbor, on edge

CHISINAU, Moldova (AP) — For tiny Moldova, an impoverished, landlocked nation that borders war-torn Ukraine but...

Christina Rexrode AP Retail Writer

NEW YORK (AP) -- When Emily Russell's two young sons wake up on Christmas morning, they'll find that Santa left them a note instead of the videogames they requested.

"Hey, I couldn't get by your house last night," Russell, a single mother from Kernersville, N.C., plans to write to her sons and sign Santa's name. "Your mom is going to take you to the store when she can."

Some people have always postponed Christmas celebrations because their jobs don't pause for the holiday. But in the weak economy, folks are delaying Christmas for another reason: money.

Deloitte's annual holiday survey for the first time asked shoppers whether they planned to wait until January to do the bulk of their shopping for Christmas. Six percent of the more than 5,000 respondents said they did.

The strategy can pay off. After Christmas, retailers offer discounts of up to 75 percent on a wider variety of items than they do in the weeks leading up to the holiday.

It's something cost-conscious shoppers have gotten hip to. Retail sales during the seven days after Christmas rose year-over-year in three of the past five years, according to research firm ShopperTrak. And last year, year-over-year online spending grew by 22 percent on Dec. 26 and 56 percent on Dec. 27, according to computer giant IBM's retail consulting arm.

Elaine Wu and her husband plan to wait until the day after Christmas to shop because they've agreed not to spend more than $150 for each other - a difficult task given they like to splurge on upscale Marc Jacobs handbags and Armani shoes.

Wu says she's also waiting until after Christmas to shop for some of her friends. Real friends, she figures, wouldn't want her to go through the headache of shopping in the pre-Christmas madness anyway.

"Just because it's a day late doesn't mean it's going to be any less special or didn't come from the same sentiment," says Wu, 36, a marketing manager for the startup website BlogHer in Silicon Valley. "It just means that it's going to save us 60 percent."

Postponing Christmas Day, originally a Christian holiday to celebrate the birth of Christ, is almost unheard of in some circles. About 95 percent of Americans celebrate Christmas - including 80 percent of non-Christians, according to Gallup polls.

But Bruce David Forbes, author of "Christmas: A Candid History," says those who delay Christmas festivities can take some comfort in the fact that Dec. 25 isn't the date of the birth of Christ.

When Christians started celebrating his birth in the 300s after the Roman emperor Constantine converted to that religion, they didn't know the birthdate, so it appears that they picked a day to coincide with Romans' midwinter celebrations of their own gods. Meanwhile, Christians in more eastern countries, like Turkey and Greece, were already celebrating on Jan. 6.

So, Forbes, who teaches religious studies at Morningside College in Sioux City, Iowa, says if you're celebrating anywhere between Dec. 25 and Jan. 6, "you're not even doing it late."

That may be a relief to Mujtaba Al-Qudaihi of Baltimore, Md., who plans to spend Dec. 25 watching a movie, catching up on reading or killing time on the Internet. His real Christmas celebration - which includes his dad dressing up as Santa and the extended family exchanging gifts and eating a big meal - will happen a few days later.

That's because it's cheaper for Al-Qudaihi and other relatives to fly to his parents' home in Indianapolis after Christmas. Besides, Al-Qudaihi figures that the prices on gifts he plans to buy will be much cheaper after Christmas.

"Nothing changes," says Al-Qudaihi, 27, who works in information-technology consulting for a public university. "Just the date."

Danielle McCurley of Lacey, Wash., also is planning to postpone Christmas a couple days. She wants to wait until her financial aid check for her school tuition arrives so she can spend the extra money on gifts.

In normal years, McCurley would have finished her Christmas shopping weeks ago. But this year is different: After losing her job as a home health aide, McCurley, 32, returned to school to study social work this fall. Adding to that, her husband, Mario, was out of work for a year and a half, though he recently found a job as a security guard.

McCurley, who has three children ages 4, 5 and 11, thinks her youngest two won't really notice. Her oldest will, but she already bought his present: a secondhand netbook that she got for a third of the original price at $100. And she figures her mom, her three brothers and her husband won't really mind the late presents.

"They're adults," McCurley says. "I don't think they'll be too upset."

Meanwhile, Russell, the North Carolinian mom, isn't sure how her sons, ages 8 and 10, will react when they learn Christmas will come late for them.

Postponing the celebration is the only way Russell, a customer service worker, can manage to afford Christmas this year because she had to take two weeks off without pay recently when her youngest had his tonsils removed. She figures if she waits until after Christmas to go shopping, she'll be able to scrounge up money to buy each boy a video game, a board game and one piece of clothing.

"It might be a little upsetting to start with," says Russell, 41. "I'll tell them, `I'm sorry Santa didn't come by today. Maybe he'll come by next week.'"

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