09-22-2023  7:37 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Oregon's Attorney General Says She Won't Seek Reelection Next Year After Serving 3 Terms

Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum, a Democrat and the first woman elected to the post, said she is stepping aside to allow new leadership, new energy and new initiatives to come to the Oregon Department of Justice that she has headed since 2012

Police Accountability Commission Presents Council With Proposed Major Overhaul

Voter-approved board for police accountability will have disciplinary power, ability to impact policy changes, access to body cam footage and more.

Oregon Judge to Decide in New Trial Whether Voter-Approved Gun Control Law Is Constitutional

The law, one of the toughest in the nation, was among the first gun restrictions to be passed after a major U.S. Supreme Court ruling last year changed the guidance judges are expected to follow when considering Second Amendment cases.

Oregon Launches Legal Psilocybin Access Amid High Demand and Hopes for Improved Mental Health Care

Epic Healing Eugene opened in June, marking Oregon's unprecedented step in offering the mind-bending drug to the public. The center now has a waitlist of more than 3,000 names, including people with depression, PTSD or end-of-life dread.

NEWS BRIEFS

Rep. Annessa Hartman Denounces Political Violence Against the Clackamas County Democratic Party

On Tuesday, the Clackamas County Democratic Party headquarters was

Bonamici Announces 5 Town Hall Meetings in October

The town hall meetings will be in St. Helens, Hillsboro, Seaside, Tillamook and Portland. ...

Nicole De Lagrave Named Multnomah Regional Teacher of the Year

De Lagrave is also a finalist for 2023-24 Oregon Teacher of the Year ...

KBOO Birthday Block Party to be Held September 23

Birthday block party planned as KBOO, 90.7FM celebrates 55 years broadcasting community radio ...

Appeals Court Allows Louisiana to Keep Children in Angola Prison

The district court had ordered the state to remove children from Angola by Sept. 15. But the Fifth Circuit issued a temporary stay,...

Biden deal with tribes promises 0M for Columbia River salmon reintroduction

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The Biden administration has pledged over 0 million toward reintroducing salmon in the Upper Columbia River Basin in an agreement with tribes that includes a stay on litigation for 20 years. The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, the Coeur...

1.5 million people asked to conserve water in Seattle because of statewide drought

SEATTLE (AP) — Seattle Public Utilities is asking about 1.5 million customers in the Seattle area to use less water as drought conditions continue throughout most of the state. Residents on Thursday were asked to stop watering their lawns, to reduce shower time, to only run full...

Missouri tries to build on upset of K-State with a game against Memphis in St. Louis

Memphis (3-0) vs Missouri (3-0) at St. Louis, Saturday, 7:30 p.m. ET (ESPNU) Line: Missouri by 7, according to FanDuel Sportsbook. Series record: Missouri leads 3-1. WHAT’S AT STAKE? Memphis won its first three games a couple of years ago...

Missouri quarterback Brady Cook endures the home boos and keeps the Tigers on an unbeaten roll

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Missouri quarterback Brady Cook spent most of last season playing through a shoulder injury so severe it required offseason surgery. Yet because he never whimpered or complained, few outside the program even knew what he had to endure. All most people saw was...

OPINION

Labor Day 2023: Celebrating the Union Difference and Building Tomorrow’s Public Service Workforce

Working people are seeing what the union difference is all about, and they want to be a part of it. ...

60 Years Since 1963 March on Washington, Economic Justice Remains a Dream

Typical Black family has 1/8 the wealth held by whites, says new research ...

The 2024 Election, President Biden and the Black Vote

As a result of the Black vote, America has experienced unprecedented recovery economically, in healthcare, and employment and in its international status. ...

Federal Trade Commission Hindering Black Economic Achievement

FTC Chair Linda Khan has prioritized her own agenda despite what Americans were telling her they needed on the ground ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

US breaking pros want to preserve Black roots, original style of hip-hop dance form at Olympics

As ambassadors of the country where breakdancing originated 50 years ago, members of Team USA have something to prove — and potentially to lose — when the hip-hop dance form makes its official debut at the Paris Games in 2024. That's because for U.S. breakers like Carmarry Hall,...

Black teens learn to fly and aim for careers in aviation in the footsteps of Tuskegee Airmen

DETROIT (AP) — Marie Ronny and Kyan Bovee expect their futures to take off. Literally. The Black teens from Detroit are part of a free program teaching young people how to fly, while exposing them to careers in aviation, an industry in which people of color are traditionally...

Indigenous people in Brazil shed tears of joy as the Supreme Court enshrines their land rights

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Indigenous people celebrated Thursday after Brazil's Supreme Court ruled to enshrine their land rights, removing the imminent threat those protections could be rolled back. The justices had been evaluating a lawsuit brought by Santa Catarina state, backed by...

ENTERTAINMENT

Movie Review: An immigrant teen who wants to fit in enters a nightmare in ‘It Lives Inside’

A beautiful Indian American teen, Samidha (Megan Suri), just wants to fit in with her suburban classmates in the new horror “ It Lives Inside.” But there’s a demon at large and it’s not hormones or puberty — it’s a literal monster that will maim and kill you and anyone who tries to help...

Music Review: Rootsy harmonies and spiritual uplift from Buddy and Julie Miller on 'In the Throes'

Buddy and Julie Miller have been wed for 40 years. Their latest album, “In the Throes,” celebrates the marvelous marriage of his rustic, raspy tenor and her eternally youthful alto. The 12-song set, which will be released Friday is filled with the Tennessee duo’s rootsy...

Music Review: The Replacements’ ‘Tim: Let it Bleed Edition’ captures the band’s sublime songwriting

Near the 40th anniversary of their fifth studio album and major label debut, “Tim,” The Replacements are releasing “Tim: Let it Bleed Edition.” The massive box set features a loving remaster of the original release of “Tim,” but the real value is in the live performance, the unreleased...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Some crossings on US-Mexico border still shut as cities, agents confront rise in migrant arrivals

EAGLE PASS, Texas (AP) — The week began in Eagle Pass with rumors that large crowds of migrants might show up....

Want a place on the UN stage? Leaders of divided nations must first get past this gatekeeper

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — It's one of the United Nations' more obscure bodies, with no space to call its own within...

US education chief considers new ways to discourage college admissions preference for kids of alumni

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden’s education chief said he’s open to using “whatever levers” are...

Want a place on the UN stage? Leaders of divided nations must first get past this gatekeeper

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — It's one of the United Nations' more obscure bodies, with no space to call its own within...

India’s Parliament passes law that will reserve a third of legislature seats for women from 2029

NEW DELHI (AP) — India’s Parliament has approved landmark legislation that reserves one-third of the seats in...

Mali’s junta struggles to fight growing violence in a northern region as UN peacekeepers withdraw

BAMAKO, Mali (AP) — Attacks in northern Mali have more than doubled since U.N. peacekeepers completed the first...

Malcom Ritter AP Science Writer


Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of
the National Institute of Allergy
and Infectious Diseases

NEW YORK (AP) -- As scientists struggle to find a vaccine to prevent infection with the AIDS virus, a study in mice suggests hope for a new approach - one that doctors now want to test in people.

The treated mice in the study appeared to have 100 percent protection against HIV. That doesn't mean the strategy will work in people. But several experts were impressed.

"This is a very important paper (about) a very creative idea," says the government's AIDS chief, Dr. Anthony Fauci. He didn't take part in the research.

The new study involved injecting mice with a protective gene, an idea that's been tested against HIV infection in animals for a decade.

In the nearly 30 years since HIV was identified, scientists haven't been able to find a vaccine that is broadly effective. One boost came in 2009, when a large study in Thailand showed that an experimental vaccine protected about a third of recipients against infection. That's not good enough for general use, but researchers are now trying to improve it.

Researchers reported the new results in mice online Wednesday in the journal Nature. They hope to test the approach in people in a couple of years. Another research team reported similar success in monkeys in 2009 and hopes to start human tests even sooner.

A traditional vaccine works by masquerading as a germ, training the body's immune system to build specific defenses in case the real germ shows up. Those defenses are generally antibodies, which are proteins in the blood that have just the right shape to grab onto parts of an invading virus. Once that happens, the virus can't establish a lasting infection and is cleared from the body.

Scientists have identified antibodies that neutralize a wide range of HIV strains, but they've had trouble getting people's immune systems to create those antibodies with a vaccine.

The gene-injection goal is straightforward. Rather than trying to train a person's immune system to devise effective antibodies, why not just give a person genes for those proteins? The genes can slip into cells in muscle or some other tissue and make them pump out lots of the antibodies.

The mouse work is reported by David Baltimore and colleagues at the California Institute of Technology.

Ordinary mice don't get infected with HIV, which attacks the immune system. So the research used mice that carried human immune system cells.

Baltimore's team used a harmless virus to carry an antibody gene and injected it once into a leg muscle. The researchers found that the mice made high levels of the antibody for more than a year. The results suggest lifetime protection for a mouse, Baltimore said, although "we simply don't know what will happen in people."

Even when the mice were injected with very high doses of HIV, they didn't show the loss of certain blood cells that results from HIV infection. Baltimore said researchers couldn't completely rule out the possibility of infection, but that their tests found no evidence of it. He said a few hundred mice appeared to be protected.

The work was funded by the federal government and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Baltimore said his lab has filed for patents.

"I think it's great," said Dr. Philip R. Johnson of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, who reported similar results in monkeys in 2009. "It provides additional evidence this is a concept that's worth moving forward."

Johnson said he has discussed doing a human trial with federal regulators and is preparing an application for permission to go ahead. If all goes well, a preliminary experiment to test the safety of the approach might begin in about a year, he said. Baltimore said his group is also planning human experiments that he hopes will start in the next couple years.

Fauci, who is director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, cautioned that mouse results don't always pan out in human studies. He also said both the gene approach and standard vaccines should be pursued because it's not clear which will work better.

"We're still in the discovery stage of both of them," he said.

Dr. Harris Goldstein, director of the Einstein-Montefiore Center for AIDS Research in New York, who has done similar research in mice, called Baltimore's result a significant advance if it works in humans because it shows a single injection produces high levels of antibodies for a long time.

It might lead not only to preventing infection, but also a treatment for infected people, he said. If it allowed people with HIV to stop or reduce their medications even for temporary periods, they could avoid the inconvenience and side effects of the drugs, he said.

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Online:

Nature: http://www.nature.com/nature

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Malcolm Ritter can be followed at http://twitter.com/malcolmritter .

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