07-23-2017  11:39 pm      •     
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NEWS BRIEFS

Augustana Lutheran Church Hosts Summer in the City Aug. 6

Free event includes BBQ, book sale, children’s games, music ...

Health Officials Warn of Spike in Heroin Overdoses

Emergency providers urge use of nalaxone, which is available without a prescription ...

Students Reach New Heights

Two rising sophomores attend aviation camp in Vancouver, Wash. ...

Northeast Portland Sunday Parkways

This summer the eight-mile bike route takes place on July 23, from 11 a.m - 4 p.m. ...

APANO: Cultural Series Launches with Solidarity Film Screening

"American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs" screens on July 25 at North Portland Library ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Throw the Doors of Opportunity Wide Open for Our Youth

Congressional Black Caucus member Robin Kelly says it’s time to pass the “Today’s American Dream Act.” ...

Trump’s Proposed Budget Cuts Threaten Civil Rights

Charlene Crowell of the Center for Responsible Lending talks about the impact of President Trump’s budget on civil rights...

Nooses on National Mall Echo Domestic Terrorism

Lauren Victoria Burke reports on a series of domestic terrorist attacks across the U.S ...

White House Proposes $9.2 Billion Cut in Education Funding

Charlene Crowell of the Center for Responsible Lending writes about the rising costs of higher education ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

Democratic presidential candidates Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., left, and Hillary Clinton pass during a break at the CNN Democratic Presidential Primary Debate at the Brooklyn Navy Yard on Thursday, April 14, 2016 in New York. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

 NEW YORK (AP) — Democrats brawled in Brooklyn while Republicans in black tie threw sharp elbows at a Manhattan gala as New York politics got rowdy ahead of the state's Tuesday presidential primary.

As protests raged outside a state GOP dinner, Republican front-runner Donald Trump delivered an impassioned defense of the city he calls home.

Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders, meanwhile, aggressively challenged each other's judgment to be president at a raucous Democratic debate over Wall Street banks, the minimum wage, gun control and foreign policy.

The Democratic debate came at a pivotal moment in the party's primary campaign, with Clinton leading in the delegate count but Sanders generating huge enthusiasm for his surprising candidacy. The debate also left no doubt that a rivalry that once centered on wonkish policy disagreements has turned strikingly personal.

The Vermont senator took a biting and often sarcastic tone as he sought to chip away at Clinton's credibility on issue after issue. He went so far as to suggest that her labeling of certain criminals as "superpredators" when she was first lady was "a racist term and everybody knew it was a racist term."

The tone among Republicans was somewhat more subdued. Trump praised the city's response to the nation's deadliest terrorist attacks in remarks designed to jab rival Ted Cruz, a Texas senator who has repeatedly condemned "New York values" in his push to defeat the New York real estate mogul.

"In our darkest moments, as a city we showed the world the very, very best in terms of bravery, heart and soul of America," Trump charged. "These are the values we need to make America great again."

On the sidewalks outside, Trump was the target of rowdy protesters who hung an effigy of the billionaire businessman and chanted, "How do you spell racist? T-R-U-M-P."

Campaigning Friday morning in East Harlem, Clinton visited Corsi Senior Center, playing game of dominos, speaking to about 75 people and touring a public housing apartment in the building. "Today, too many new Yorkers are struggling to pay rising rents. They're being priced out of communities where they've been for years. ... And Latino and black families are being hit the hardest. "

Sanders arrived Friday in Rome for a Vatican City conference on social and economic justice, which he said was too meaningful to pass up. At the conference, he issued a global call to action to address "immoral and unsustainable" wealth inequality and poverty.

For Clinton, a win in New York, a state that twice elected her senator would blunt Sanders' recent momentum and put his pursuit of the nomination further behind. A Sanders upset in New York would shake up the race, raising fresh concerns about her candidacy and breathing new life into the Vermont senator's campaign.

The Democratic primary has been fought for months on familiar terrain. Clinton has cast Sanders' proposals for breaking up banks and offering free tuition at public colleges and universities as unrealistic. Sanders has accused Clinton of being part of a rigged economic and political system, hammering her repeatedly for giving paid speeches to Wall Street banks and refusing to release the transcripts.

Clinton continued to struggle to explain why she has not released the transcripts, saying only that she'll do so when other candidates are required to do the same. She tried to raise questions about Sanders' own openness by noting that he has yet to release his income tax information.

The senator pledged to release his most recent tax returns on Friday, and said there would be "no big money from speeches, no major investments" in the disclosures.

Oregon Lottery PM Home (2)
Calendar
Carpentry Professionals

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

The Skanner Photo Archives