12-13-2017  5:14 am      •     
MLK Breakfast
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NEWS BRIEFS

Special Call for Stories about the Spanish Flu

Genealogical Forum of Oregon seeks stories from the public about one of history's most lethal outbreaks ...

Joint Office of Homeless Services Announces Severe Weather Strategy

Those seeking shelter should call 211 or visit 211.org. Neighbors needed to volunteer, donate cold-weather apparel ...

Q&A with Facebook's Global Director of Diversity Maxine Williams

A conversation on diversity and the tech industry ...

City Announces Laura John as Tribal Liason

Laura John brings an extensive background in tribal advocacy and community engagement to the city of Portland ...

Humboldt Sewer Repair Project Update: Dec. 4

Environmental Services continues to repair more than 3 miles of public sewer pipes ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

The Skanner Editorial: Alabama Voters Must Reject Moore

Allegations of predatory behavior are troubling – and so is his resume ...

Payday Lenders Continue Attack on Consumer Protections

Charlene Crowell of the Center for Responsible Lending writes that two bills that favor predatory lenders has received bipartisan...

Hundreds Rallied for Meek Mill, but What About the Rest?

Lynette Monroe, a guest columnist for the NNPA Newswire, talks about Meek Mill, the shady judge that locked him up and mass...

Top 10 Holiday Foods to Avoid Feeding Your Pet

Dr. Jasmine Streeter explains why pampering pets with holiday treats can be dangerous (and pricey) ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

Democratic presidential candidates Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., left, and Hillary Clinton pass during a break at the CNN Democratic Presidential Primary Debate at the Brooklyn Navy Yard on Thursday, April 14, 2016 in New York. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
JULIE PACE, JONATHAN LEMIRE, Associated Press

 NEW YORK (AP) — Democrats brawled in Brooklyn while Republicans in black tie threw sharp elbows at a Manhattan gala as New York politics got rowdy ahead of the state's Tuesday presidential primary.

As protests raged outside a state GOP dinner, Republican front-runner Donald Trump delivered an impassioned defense of the city he calls home.

Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders, meanwhile, aggressively challenged each other's judgment to be president at a raucous Democratic debate over Wall Street banks, the minimum wage, gun control and foreign policy.

The Democratic debate came at a pivotal moment in the party's primary campaign, with Clinton leading in the delegate count but Sanders generating huge enthusiasm for his surprising candidacy. The debate also left no doubt that a rivalry that once centered on wonkish policy disagreements has turned strikingly personal.

The Vermont senator took a biting and often sarcastic tone as he sought to chip away at Clinton's credibility on issue after issue. He went so far as to suggest that her labeling of certain criminals as "superpredators" when she was first lady was "a racist term and everybody knew it was a racist term."

The tone among Republicans was somewhat more subdued. Trump praised the city's response to the nation's deadliest terrorist attacks in remarks designed to jab rival Ted Cruz, a Texas senator who has repeatedly condemned "New York values" in his push to defeat the New York real estate mogul.

"In our darkest moments, as a city we showed the world the very, very best in terms of bravery, heart and soul of America," Trump charged. "These are the values we need to make America great again."

On the sidewalks outside, Trump was the target of rowdy protesters who hung an effigy of the billionaire businessman and chanted, "How do you spell racist? T-R-U-M-P."

Campaigning Friday morning in East Harlem, Clinton visited Corsi Senior Center, playing game of dominos, speaking to about 75 people and touring a public housing apartment in the building. "Today, too many new Yorkers are struggling to pay rising rents. They're being priced out of communities where they've been for years. ... And Latino and black families are being hit the hardest. "

Sanders arrived Friday in Rome for a Vatican City conference on social and economic justice, which he said was too meaningful to pass up. At the conference, he issued a global call to action to address "immoral and unsustainable" wealth inequality and poverty.

For Clinton, a win in New York, a state that twice elected her senator would blunt Sanders' recent momentum and put his pursuit of the nomination further behind. A Sanders upset in New York would shake up the race, raising fresh concerns about her candidacy and breathing new life into the Vermont senator's campaign.

The Democratic primary has been fought for months on familiar terrain. Clinton has cast Sanders' proposals for breaking up banks and offering free tuition at public colleges and universities as unrealistic. Sanders has accused Clinton of being part of a rigged economic and political system, hammering her repeatedly for giving paid speeches to Wall Street banks and refusing to release the transcripts.

Clinton continued to struggle to explain why she has not released the transcripts, saying only that she'll do so when other candidates are required to do the same. She tried to raise questions about Sanders' own openness by noting that he has yet to release his income tax information.

The senator pledged to release his most recent tax returns on Friday, and said there would be "no big money from speeches, no major investments" in the disclosures.

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