11 26 2014
  2:50 pm  
     •     
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • Default
  • Title
  • Date
  • Random
  • Nearly one in three retailers in Multnomah County illegally sold tobacco to minors last summer  
    Read More
  • PHOTO: Still image from The Imitation Game.   BIG BUDGET FILMS Horrible Bosses 2 (R for pervasive profanity and crude sexuality) Jason Bateman, Jason Sudeikis and Charlie Day reunite for revenge-fueled sequel as inept entrepreneurs-turned-kidnappers who hatch a cockamamie plan to hold the son (Chris Pine) of a ruthless businessman (Christoph Waltz) for ransom. Cast includes Jennifer Aniston, Jamie Foxx, Kevin Spacey and Keegan-Michael Key. The Imitation Game (PG-13 for sexual references, mature themes and smoking) Historical biopic about Alan Turing (Benedict Cumberbatch), the British cryptologist who helped the Allies defeat the Nazis by cracking the Enigma Code, only to be prosecuted and chemically castrated following World War II for being gay. With Keira Knightley, Matthew Goode and Mark Strong.   Penguins of Madagascar (PG for mild action and rude humor) 4th installment in the animated franchise finds the peripatetic quartet of penguin protagonists (Tom McGrath, Chris Miller, Conrad Vernon and Christopher Knights) joining forces with an undercover, inter-species task force to apprehend a diabolical madman (John Malkovich) bent on world domination. Voice cast includes Benedict Cumberbatch, Dr. Ken Jeong and Peter Stormare. INDEPENDENT & FOREIGN FILMS Antarctica: A Year on Ice (PG for mild epithets and mature themes) Subzero documentary chronicling what life is like at a couple of ice stations located near the South Pole. The Babadook (Unrated) Haunted house flick, set in Adelaide, Australia, about a grieving widow (Essie Davis) who comes to substantiate her young son’s (Noah Wiseman) complaints about a monster inhabiting their home. Cast includes Daniel Henshall, Tim Purcell and Cathy Adamek. Before I Disappear (Unrated) Surrealistic saga, set in NYC, about a suicidal twenty-something (Shawn Christensen) who finds new meaning in life by babysitting his prepubescent niece (Fatima Ptacek) for his long-estranged sister (Emmy Rossum). With Ron Perlman, Paul Wesley and Richard Schiff. Escobar: Paradise Lost (Unrated) Romance thriller, set in Colombia in the summer of 1991, about a Canadian surfer dude (Josh Hutchinson) who is pressured to serve as a hit man after falling for the niece (Claudia Traisac) of drug cartel kingpin Pablo Escobar (Benicio del Toro). Support cast includes Anne Giradot, Carlos Bardem and Brady Corbet. The Immortalists (Unrated) Fountain of Youth documentary chronicling the efforts of a couple of eccentric biologists desperate to live forever. The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness (Unrated) Reverential biopic revisiting the six-decade career of legendary Japanese filmmaker, artist, animator, illustrator, producer and scriptwriter Hayao Miyazaki. (In Japanese with subtitles) Remote Area Medical (Unrated) Domestic doctors without borders documentary about the free healthcare offered uninsured Appalachians once a year at a pop-up clinic set up for three days at a NASCAR speedway in Bristol, Tennessee. The Rule (Unrated) Inspirational documentary about the overachieving students at St. Benedict’s Prep, a Catholic school in Newark, New Jersey whose mostly Latino and African-American graduates enjoy a nearly 100 percent college acceptance rate. A Small Section of the World (Unrated) Tale of female empowerment about a group of women who sparked a coffee-growing revolution in Costa Rica. Touch the Wall (Unrated) “Bound for Greatness” biopic about Missy Franklin, the Olympic swimmer who won a quartet of gold medals at the 2012 games in London. Featuring appearances by Lara Lynn Joyce, Rowdy Gaines and Michael Phelps. Women Who Flirt (Unrated) Romantic comedy, set in Shanghai, revolving around a college student (Zhou Xun) who relies on her womanly wiles to woo the classmate (Xiaoming Huang) she has a crush on when he returns from a trip to Taiwan with a new girlfriend (Sonia Sui) in tow. With Yi-Lin Hsieh. (In Cantonese with subtitles)  
    Read More
  • Violence broke out after a Grand Jury refused to indict a police officer who fatally shot an unarmed teenager -- read the court documents here  
    Read More
load morehold SHIFT key to load allload all
Russell Wilson before a game

Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson (3) warms up before the first half of an NFL football game against the Carolina Panthers, Sunday, Oct. 26, 2014, in Charlotte. (AP Photo/Bob Leverone)

The Black Athlete

In early October, Seattle Seahawks Super Bowl winning quarterback, Russell Wilson, published a revealing article on ThePlayersTribune.com, where he discussed his years of being a bully in grade school. Wilson realized that it would be beneficial to tarnish his squeaky-clean image so more fans and players alike could relate to him. But now it’s been reported that unnamed “sources” within the Seahawks locker room claim some players don’t consider Wilson “black enough,” while being too close to the team’s upper management.

It seems like just yesterday when 2nd-term African-American President, Barack Obama, was questioned about not being “black enough” while running for the presidency in 2008. Former Miami Dolphins lineman, Jonathan Martin, was deemed not “black enough” by his African-American teammates a year ago, when being bullied and called the N-word by white veteran player, Richie Incognito. A year before that, Washington’s popular Heisman Trophy winner, Robert Griffin III, was speculated of being a “cornball brother” by African-American sportswriter, Rob Parker, who was quoting discussions overheard at his local Detroit barbershops.

The ongoing and bitter history of African-Americans who mistrust, ostracize and bully each other into following certain stereotypical traits, beliefs and concerns of the community has been a long and conflicting battle.

On one hand, certain group decisions are still needed to benefit the race as a whole, in particular on issues of politics that may affect fair education, employment, housing, taxation and the fair practices of American law. But when it comes to individual beliefs, ideas, habits, likes, dislikes and behaviors, all bets are off. Each person should have a God-given right and license to be who they are.

Restriction on individualism is where the problems lie. There have been far too many disputes about how someone looks, walks, talks, dresses, who they hang out with, what music they listen to, and who they marry.

I participated in such race bullying in my college years, where certain small town kids were teased for being less than urban cool. When you’re born and raised in the strong cultured big cities of Philadelphia, New York, Washington DC, Chicago, Detroit, and so on, you tend to set a higher bar of what black is supposed to be. Everything else becomes “country,” “corny,” “backwards,” “bama” and “not black enough.” 

Seahawks-WilsonPHOTO: Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson (3) works against the Carolina Panthers during the first half of an NFL football game, Sunday, Oct. 26, 2014, in Charlotte. (AP Photo/Mike McCarn)           

However, the most harmful type of black-on-black bullying is when we accuse someone of “acting white,” “selling out” or being an “oreo.” Without realizing the many societal implications involved, “acting white” becomes a label for African-Americans who have higher academic standards, speak correct English, read books, live in higher economic neighbors, are successful at their goals, and are accepted and sociable with white American peers.

Wow, that sounds like Russell Wilson. But the problem is, if all of that is “acting white” and not being “black enough,” then what is “acting black” and being “real”—having low academic standards, speaking broken English, never reading anything, living in poverty, never reaching your goals, and not being accepted or sociable with white America?

Think about it. What exactly are we saying when we quantify the words “black” and “white?” Because the last time I checked the dictionary, everything “white” is deemed fresh, clean, innocent, angelic, perfect, ideal, good, honest, bright, new, beginning, exact and unmarked. In contrast, “black” is labeled soiled, dark, evil, deadly, mysterious, deceptive, violent, secretive, demonic, tragic and the end of things.

Ironically, the color “black” is also identified with power and elegance, like Black Power and black-tie affairs. However, that’s not the identification of the word “black” that African-Americans are referring to when they claim that someone isn’t “black enough,” I assure you. The question is, what do they mean by the term? I’ve never used it, because I understand that they are degrees to everything. And your “not black enough” may be someone else’s “too black.”

Like the use of the N-word that sports media professionals argued about last year, the African-American term “not black enough” will continue to be argued about as well. Nevertheless, one has to wonder if the Seattle Seahawks were a dominate 6-0 or 5-1 instead of a struggling 4-3, whether Russell Wilson’s degree of blackness would have ever become an issue.

Hence, losing and complaining about your teammates becomes a “black thing,” while winning and loving your guys is all right and “white.” Think about it.

 

Omar Tyree is a New York Times bestselling author, an NAACP Image Award winner for Outstanding Fiction and a professional journalist @ www.OmarTyree.com

 

 

Carpentry Professionals
THIS SITE WORKS BEST ON GOOGLE CHROME

PHOTO GALLERY

Calendar

About Us

Twist Your Dickens
Breaking News

The Skanner TV

Turn the pages

The_Spinners