09-20-2017  11:45 pm      •     
The Wake of Vanport
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NEWS BRIEFS

Tim Burgess Inaugurated as 55th Mayor of Seattle

Burgess, a former radio journalist, served as Seattle City Councilmember from 2008 to 2017 ...

Mobile Mammography Van Comes to Health Fair, Oct. 7

Onsite mammograms, music, food, health information, and fun ...

Humboldt Sewer Repair Project Update: September 15, 2017

Environmental Services continues a project to repair more than 3 miles of public sewer pipes ...

NAACP Portland Branch Invites Community to Monthly General Membership Meeting

Meeting takes place from noon to 2 p.m. Sept. 23 ...

Portland to Launch Online Platform to Ease Rental Applications

One App Oregon will reduce barriers to accessing affordable housing for the city's renters ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Jeff Trades an Unknown Known for a Known Known

Jeff Tryens reflects on life in Central Oregon ...

We Must Have A New Poor People's Campaign and Moral Revival

Bishop William J. Barber II pens an exclusive op-ed about the need for a New Poor People's Campaign and Moral Revival. ...

Rebuilding the Gulf Coast, Preparing for the Next Harvey

Bill Fletcher talks about impact of Hurricane Harvey on poor workers on the the Gulf Coast. ...

It’s Time for Congress to Pass a Hurricane Harvey Emergency Funding Package

Congressional Black Caucus Members talk about recovery efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

Hillary Clinton speaks to Rep. Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn.
Ken Thomas, Associated Press

PHOTO: Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton talks with Rep. Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn., after taking part in a forum sponsored by the Center for American Progress, Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014 in Washington. Democrats are trying to persuade women to vote in the fall midterm elections as they work to keep their Senate majority. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said Thursday that voters need to turn pay inequity and women's economic security into a political movement in the November elections and beyond, pointing to an issue that could animate a future presidential campaign.

Clinton, the Democratic former senator and first lady who is considering another presidential bid, said policy issues like raising the minimum wage, equal pay for women and providing families with access to quality, affordable child care need to be prominent in the upcoming elections.

"When we can turn an issue into a political movement that demands people be responsive during the election season, it carries over," Clinton said. "These issues have to be in the life blood of this election and in any election."

Clinton spoke at a forum sponsored by the Center for American Progress, which was formed more than a decade ago by veterans of her husband's administration, where she was joined by House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi of California, Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York and Patty Murray of Washington and others. The panel was moderated by Neera Tanden, the center's president and Clinton's former policy adviser.

Democrats are trying to persuade women to vote in the fall midterm elections as they work to keep their Senate majority. Female voters could hold the key in several competitive Senate races, including North Carolina, Iowa and Colorado, and Democrats are hoping female candidates in Kentucky and Georgia can help them win in Republican-leaning states.

For Clinton, who could become the nation's first female president if she successfully seeks the White House in 2016, the round table discussion offered a window into what could become part of a future policy message. Clinton has long advocated on behalf of women and girls around the globe and promoted economic policies aimed at helping working mothers, such as extended leave for family and medical issues, raising the minimum wage and pay equity.

Clinton said if the level of employment among women was raised to the same level as men, the nation's economy would benefit. Referencing the need to break the glass ceiling for women, she said the issue of economic security resonates with women and families across the nation.

"The floor is collapsing. You talk about a glass ceiling — these women don't even have a secure floor under them," she said.

___

Follow Ken Thomas on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP_Ken_Thomas

Carpentry Professionals
Artists Rep An Octoroon
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

MLK Breakfast

The Skanner Photo Archives