05-29-2017  10:24 pm      •     
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NEWS BRIEFS

Portland Art Museum Hosts Upstanders Festival May 27

Event includes spoken word, workshops and poster making in support of social justice ...

Happy Memorial Day

The Skanner wishes readers a safe and happy Memorial Day ...

North Portland Library Announces June Computer Classes

Upcoming courses include Introduction to Spreadsheets, What is the Cloud? and Learn Programming with Games ...

Merkley to Hold Town Hall in Clackamas County

Sen. Jeff Merkley to hold town hall in Clackamas County, May 30 ...

NAACP Monthly Meeting Notice, May 27, Portland

NAACP Portland invites the community to its monthly general membership meeting ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Ensuring the Promise of the Every Student Succeeds Act

The preservation of Thurgood Marshall's legacy is dependent upon our dedication to our children ...

CFPB Sues Ocwen Financial over Unfair Mortgage Practices

What many homeowners soon discover is that faithfully paying a monthly mortgage is in some cases, just not enough ...

B-CU Grads Protest Betsy “DeVoid” in Epic Fashion

Julianne Malveaux says that Betsy “DeVoid,” is no Mary McLeod Bethune ...

NAACP on Supreme Court's Decline to Review NC Voter ID Law

NAACP President and CEO Cornell William Brooks made the following remarks ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

advanced placement booklet with students

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Oregon students are taking and passing rigorous Advanced Placement courses at significantly lower rates than the national average, including their peers neighboring Washington.

The state ranked 29th in the percentage of its 2013 graduates who passed at least one AP exam during their high school career, the College Board said Tuesday in its annual “AP Report to the Nation.”

The results show 15 percent of recent Oregon graduates had an AP score of 3 or better on an exam — the mark associated with receiving college credit. That trails the national average of 20 percent. Meanwhile, only 24 percent of the recent graduates took at least one AP course during high school, well below the U.S. average of 33 percent.

In Washington, 34 percent of students enrolled in at least one AP course and 21 percent scored a 3 or better on an exam. California also easily bested Oregon while Idaho trailed the Beaver State in both categories.

Advanced Placement classes are seen as good preparation for college and there has been a state and national push to get more students to enroll.

Deputy superintendent of Oregon schools Rob Saxton noted in a statement that far more students take AP courses than 10 years ago. But he also identified two “troubling trends” — teenagers who have the potential to succeed are not bothering to participate and many are students of color.

The College Board statistics show less than 10 percent of Oregon's Hispanic, Native American and African American graduates got a score of 3 or higher on an AP exam.

Saxton said educators must do a better job of identifying good candidates, getting them to enroll and providing them with support.

“All of our students deserve a clear path to college and that starts with ensuring that each and every student has access to rigorous content and the opportunity — and encouragement — to earn college credit while in high school,” he said.

Oregon officials have said boosting the AP participation rate is an important step in meeting the state's “40-40-20” goal. By 2025, the state expects to see 40 percent of students attain at least a four-year degree and another 40 percent earn an associate's degree or other career credential. All students will be expected to graduate from high school.

Oregon Lottery
Calendar
The Armory Constellations

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events