04-26-2018  1:47 pm      •     
The Skanner Report
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NEWS BRIEFS

New Year in the Park Festival

Festival in Glenhaven Park celebrates Cambodian, Lao, Thai and Burmese cultures ...

Safeco, Century Link Fields to Go Fully Tobacco Free

Prohibiting smokeless tobacco completes the ban of tobacco at professional sporting events in King County. ...

Ballots Out For Delivery Today

USPS delivers ballots Wednesday, April 25 for the May 15 Primary Election ...

GFO Announces Upcoming Classes, Workshops & Special Interest Groups

Upcoming events include regional special interest groups, Cuban genealogy talk and a DNA workshop ...

Event: Going Beyond the Flint Water & Housing Crises

Recode invites speakers to discuss the Flint water crisis and its relationship to gentrification, displacement, and housing crises ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

The Skanner News Endorsements for May 2018 Elections

Read The Skanner News' endorsements for Oregon, Multnomah County, Portland City Council and more ...

Will HUD Secretary Ben Carson Enforce the Fair Housing Act?

Julianne Malveaux questions HUD Secretary Ben Carson’s ability to enforce the Fair Housing Act ...

Waiting While Black in Philadelphia Can Get You Arrested

Reggie Shuford on the daily indignities African-Americans face in Philadelphia and around the country ...

Black People Must Vote or Reap the Consequences

Jeffrey Boney on the importance of voting in the Black community ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

drone communication
Mike Ahlers CNN

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The Federal Aviation Administration took the initial steps Thursday toward introducing privately operated unmanned aircraft into the heavily populated U.S. skies, issuing two documents it hopes will pave the way for manned and unmanned aircraft to co-exist.

One of the documents outlines the many steps federal agencies must take; the second is a road map for the FAA itself.

Currently, the FAA approves of the use of unmanned aircraft on a case-by-case basis. They are largely limited to military airspace and the U.S. borders, along with use in special circumstances, such as reconnaissance over forest fires.

But there is a big and growing demand to use remotely piloted vehicles for private and commercial purposes.

The documents released Thursday set forth a process to increase access to airspace in the next five to 10 years, the FAA said.

The mission is complicated, requiring the mixing of manned aircraft, which operate under see-and-avoid rules, with remotely piloted aircraft, which operate under sense-and-avoid rules. And the new rules must address everything from small aircraft used by hobbyists to large Predator-type drones currently used by the military.

"Government and industry face significant challenges as unmanned aircraft move into the aviation mainstream," Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx said in a prepared statement. The road map "is an important step forward that will help stakeholders understand the operational goals and safety issues we need to consider when planning for the future of our airspace."

The FAA said its road map stresses that the unmanned aircraft community must understand the system is not static, and that many improvements are planned for the airspace system over the next 15 years.

Congress has ordered the FAA to select six sites in which to test the safe integration of manned and unmanned aircraft. The FAA is expected to name those sites early next year.

 

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