11-22-2017  3:53 pm      •     
MLK Breakfast
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NEWS BRIEFS

Kenton Library Hosts African American Genealogy Event Dec. 2

Stephen Hanks to present on genealogy resources and methods ...

PSU Hires New Police Chief

Donnell Tanksley brings policing philosophy rooted in community engagement to PSU ...

African American Portraits Exhibit at PAM Ends Dec. 29

Towards the end of its six month run, exhibit conveys the Black experience, late 1800s - 1990s ...

SEI, Sunshine Division Offer Thanksgiving Meals to Families in Need

Turkeys are being provided to fill 200 Thanksgiving food boxes for SEI families ...

NAACP Portland Monthly Meeting Nov. 18

Monthly general membership meeting takes place on Saturday, 12 - 2 p.m. ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Black Celebrities, Athletes and Politicians Must Respect the Black Press

Rosetta Miller-Perry discusses how Black celebrities snub the Black Press when they get “discovered” by the mainstream media ...

Local Author Visits North Portland Library

Renee Watson teaches students and educators about the power of writing ...

Is the FBI’s New Focus on “Black Identity Extremists” the New COINTELPRO?

Rep. Cedric L. Richmond (D-La.) talks about the FBI’s misguided report on “Black Identity Extremism” and negative Facebook ads. ...

ACA Enrollment Surging, Even Though It Ends Dec. 15

NNPA contributing writer Cash Michaels writes about enrollment efforts ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

Eric Ture Muhamad the Final Call

Black FarmersATLANTA (FinalCall.com) - George B. Hildebrandt is 72-years-old and comes from several generations of farmers.

He has diabetes. He has problems looking into direct sunlight. He struggles to maintain glucose levels to keep his "sugar up."

His sons were raised on his 242-acre soybean farm. They have moved on, carving out other professions and ending a family tradition of tilling the land.

Despite his ailments, Mr. Hildebrandt left his wife Patricia in Leavenworth County, Kansas and traveled nearly 900 miles to join a small group of Black farmers and agri-businessmen on the doorsteps of cable news giant CNN.

They are desperate.

They are hoping to draw attention to what they call a crisis in Black farming.

Blacks have lost millions of acres of land over the years; have been unfairly denied loans and assistance, and the group of largely aging farmers complain of more stalling on promises made by the United States Department of Agriculture.

They feel cheated. They fear the demise of a lifestyle they have loved and they want justice—whether they will get the justice they seek or not remains a question.

The farmers have engaged in daily protests in downtown Atlanta since Sept. 5 and call themselves "Filibuster," a movement organized by the USDA Coalition of Black Employees and Minority Farmers.

They call the Agriculture Department "the last plantation" and have vowed to protest until their demands are met. They want promised easy access to low cost loans that should have come alongside debt relief to keep their land. The promises were made by USDA as atonement for decades of denial of loans and support that the farmers qualified for.

The federal government promised to forgive debt incurred as farmers tried to survive the negative and costly impact of racial discrimination. Those promises were made in what is commonly called the Pigford II settlement, which was the result of a lawsuit alleging racially motivated wrongdoing by USDA employees and decision-makers, said protest organizers.

A long history of discrimination, and lawsuits beginning in 1999 led to promises to reverse and end denial of assistance Black farmers qualified for. The wrongs of the past have never been righted, the farmers charge. A highly touted USDA settlement with Black farmers announced by President Obama in February 2010 has been a failure, said the farmers.

Armed with dozens of individual filings against USDA and its farm loan programs—the small group of farmers from Georgia, Alabama, and Kansas say they are still denied loans, subjected to broken agreements and mistreatment.

They tried to post up on the steps of CNN to get mainstream media attention. CNN security told the mostly elderly group of Black men, they had to move and no protests are allowed on network property.

They were advised to protest in a front of a state park across the street. They moved. Georgia State Police forced the group to move again. Eventually they settled on a corner across from CNN and launched their campaign. Handing out fliers, they talked to whoever would listen, recounting their woes and the alleged abuses. People listened but the press didn't, said protest organizers.

Not one media outlet covered the demonstrations beyond The Final Call, said the farmers.

Several media outlets verified getting press releases from the group, but they didn't send reporters to hear the group's concerns.

In his 36th installment of the weekly lecture series, "The Time and What Must Be Done," the Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan Sept. 14 talked about the value God places on land, farming and animal husbandry.

"Farming and agriculture is the first profession that Allah (God) introduced to man," said Minister Farrakhan.

"And (Allah) God took the man and put him into the Garden of Eden to dress it and keep it," the Minister said. But, he added, today farmers are aging, disrespected and Black land is dwindling, he said. Blacks must get back to farming and purchase land to ensure their survival, he warned.

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