06-29-2017  5:24 am      •     
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NEWS BRIEFS

Local Government, Employers Welcome Youth to SummerWorks

A record 1,150 youth will gain real-world work experience in jobs across Portland metro ...

Multnomah County Library Hosts ‘We Refuse to Be Enemies’

Library will hold a series of social justice workshops this summer ...

The Skanner Wins NNPA Award for Best Layout and Design

Our graphic designer Patricia Irvin wins for July 2016 issues ...

Cooling Centers to open in Multnomah County Saturday, Sunday

Temperatures expected to climb into the upper 90s this weekend ...

Multnomah County Leaders Release Statement on Safety at Summer Events

Officials advise public to check in, have a plan and be aware at public events ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Ask Ernie the Attorney

Ernest Warren's primary practice is personal injury, real property, corporate and criminal practice in Ore. and Wash. ...

Our Children Deserve High Quality Teachers

It’s critical that parents engage with educational leaders and demand equal access to high quality teachers ...

Civil Rights Groups Ask for Broad Access to Affordable Lending

Charlene Crowell writes that today’s public policy housing debate is also an opportunity to learn from the mistakes of the past and...

Criminal Justice Disparities Present Barriers to Re-entry

Congressional Black Caucus Member Rep. Danny Davis (D-Ill.) writes about the fight to reduce disparities in our criminal justice...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT






home brew beer equipmentMost beer guts are the result of consuming fermented brew, but a new case study describes a rare syndrome that had one man's gut fermenting brew, not consuming it.

It's called gut fermentation syndrome or auto-brewery syndrome, and it's "a relatively unknown phenomenon in Western medicine" according to a study published in July's International Journal of Clinical Medicine. "Only a few cases have been reported in the last three decades" according to Dr. Barbara Cordell, the dean of nursing at Panola College in Carthage, Texas, and Dr. Justin McCarthy, a Lubbock gastroenterologist, the study's authors.

The most current case comes courtesy of an unnamed 61-year-old Texas man who for five years seemed to be drunk -- all of the time.

His wife, a nurse, began to give him breathalyzer tests. Even when he hadn't been drinking at all, his blood alcohol content was as high 0.40 -- five times the legal driving limit -- according to the study.

But the medical community was largely unaware of Gut Fermentation Syndrome then, so the patient wasn't always believed. In 2009 he was admitted into an emergency room on a day he hadn't had a sip of alcohol and blew a 0.37.

"The physicians were not aware of any way that a person could be intoxicated without ingesting alcohol and therefore believed he must be a "closet drinker," the paper says.

Finally, after a 24-hour observation period at a gastroenterology practice in 2010 -- one in which he saw no visitors and underwent a battery of tests -- doctors figured out what was ailing him: His stomach was turning food into booze.

"The underlying mechanism is thought to be an overgrowth of yeast in the gut whereby the yeast ferments carbohydrates into ethanol."

After a regimen of antifungal medication, his yeast was in check, and he was registering zeroes on the breathalyzer.

The authors conclude their paper by imploring their colleagues in the field to take gut fermentation syndrome seriously.

"This is a rare syndrome but should be recognized because of the social implications such as loss of job, relationship difficulties, stigma, and even possible arrest and incarceration," the authors write.

 

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